Details for QCT CIRCULATION - Ad from 2018-05-17

®

®

®

®

®

®

®

®
®

®

®
®

What to Collect

What we collect says a lot about us—our style,
our history, and the moment we live in.
So we wanted to know: What’s hot now in the
wide, wonderful world of antiquing?

Find out what’s hot
now in the wide,
wonderful world
of antiquing.

LEATHER

WHY IT’S HOT: Although part and
parcel with the current passion
for all things natural, leather-clad
objects have always signaled quality.
Collectors today value patina over
perfection, preferring leather

seating, satchels, and books that
show the cracks, stains, and softness
of a well-loved piece. HINT: Available
at a range of prices, leather-bound
books are topping the best-seller list.
“There is a high demand for leatherbounds,” says Michael Breddin,
co-owner of Leftovers Antiques in
Brenham, Texas. COST: “Books by
a valuable author or on a popular
subject matter can fetch $115 and
higher,” Breddin says. “But you can
also find leather-bounds for $15.”
The pièce de résistance in leather
collecting is the French club chair,
fetching $4,000 on average.

LOVING
CUPS AND
TROPHIES

WHY THEY’RE HOT:
We’re drawn to
vintage pieces for the
stories they tell, and
no pieces tell that
story more directly
than loving cups.
“They’re fun,” says
Kim Rawlins of Sweet
Salvage in Phoenix.
“They celebrate
everyday life and
accomplishments.”
HINT: Collectors
consider shape,
material, and subject
matter. “The most
popular pieces are
etched and have a
sense of humor about
them,” Rawlins says. “Engraved pieces bring higher
prices—because
they were earned.” COST: Classic sterling-silver urn-shape
cups are the
hot ticket, but size also matters. Small trophies can
still be found for
$30, but on average expect to shell out $100 or more
for antique and
sterling-silver examples.

COMING 05.20.18

MILK GLASS

WHY IT’S HOT: This evergreen collectible
is spiking in popularity as a new generation
discovers its pure white beauty. Milk glass
was invented in Venice in the 1500s, but
its American heyday kicked off at the end
of the 19th century. The opaque glass was
pressed into an impressive array of pieces
and, despite its name, it wasn’t always
white. The hobnail pattern has long been
the most popular and most available.
HINT: Milk glass was made over several
decades and is still made today—so buyer
beware. To test a piece’s age, check for a
smooth, silky feel. Newer pieces will be
grainy. Also hold an object up to the light
to look for the “ring of fire,” an iridescent
halo that indicates a pre-1950s piece when
iridized salts were used in the formula.
COST: The sheer breadth of milk glass
means there are finds at all price points.
Rare McKee animals will set you back $100
to $150; plentiful hobnail florist vases from
the 1960s can still be found for a buck.

KITCHEN SCALES

WHY THEY’RE HOT: Balance the current love affair
for
industrial, utilitarian pieces with a desire to add vintage
charm
to a modern-day kitchen, and you’ve got a hot collectible—
kitchen scales. HINT: Often made of colored enamel
with an
attached stainless-steel or enamel pan, many scales
were
sold by Montgomery Ward or Sears and feature the
name
prominently on the dial. COST: Scales from the turn
of the
century that were cast of iron or steel carry a heavy
price tag
of more than $150. Enamel scales are more available,
but their
current popularity now has them weighing in at around
$100.

Look for the Better Every Week
section each Sunday

LIVE WITH WHAT YOU LOVE

Pick up a copy of Country Home®
magazine on sale now, or shop
TheMeredithStore.com for more
design inspiration.

Categories

You may be interested in