Genesis Health System and Moline officials, along with members of the family that once own the land where a medical park will be built, gathered Thursday to plant a tree at the site.

The property, at 26th Avenue and 41st Street in Moline, served as a homestead, farm, grocery store, coal mine and landfill before Genesis bought the property in 1998 from the Ferry family.

Starlynne Boswell of Moline, whose family owned the property before selling it to Genesis, noted that the tree was planted where the first house was located on the 66-acre property.

Two coal mines were operated on the property between 1991 and 1930. The property served as a landfill from the mid-1940s to 1960. A landfill fire in 1960 burned for nine months despite attempts to extinguish it.

The site, cleared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for development in 1999, will be the Genesis Medical Park. Described as a “one-stop shop,” for health care, a 52,000-square-foot medical office will have doctors, convenient care, wellness services, a lab, pharmacy, radiology and home medical equipment.

Changes in how to deliver health-care services and the Affordable Care Act led to the medical park’s concept, Genesis CEO Doug Cropper said.

The 20-foot spruce was transplanted from Genesis’ East Rusholme Street campus in Davenport where it was removed because of a construction project. Its planting serves as a groundbreaking for the Moline project. After the tree was planted, suet decorations were placed on the tree for the neighborhood birds.

Construction began immediately after the tree-planting event.

“It has been a long process, with starts and stops along the way, but we now have a development plan that will positively impact the health and wellness of the region,” said Florence Spyrow, a senior vice president for Genesis. “It’s an exciting day because not only are we hosting a ceremonial groundbreaking, we’re truly breaking ground and starting construction very quickly.”

The location of the tree was carefully planned. Because the site was a former brownfield that required remediation, the tree was placed in native soil on the site, rather than where clay soil was used to cap the residential and industrial waste.

“We will be integrating a number of green features into the site and the building plans,” Spyrow said. “We’ve taken a property that was blighted and was an environmental hazard and turned it back into a useful, beautiful site that will serve the public for decades to come.”

The site will also have walking trails and a green space.


Earlier story

Genesis Health System and Moline officials, along with members of the family that used to own the land where a medical park will be built, gathered to plant a tree at the site today.

The property, off 41st Street in Moline, served as a homestead, farm, grocery store, coal mine and landfill before Genesis bought the property in 1998 from the Ferry family.

The site, cleared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for development in 1999, will be the Genesis Medical Park, described as a “one-stop shop” for health care, with doctors, convenient care, wellness services, a lab, pharmacy, radiology and home medical equipment.

The 20-foot spruce is being transplanted from Genesis’ East Rusholme Street campus in Davenport where it was removed because of a construction project there. Its planting serves as a groundbreaking for the Moline project. After the tree was planted, suet decorations were placed on the tree for the neighborhood birds.

“It has been a long process, with starts and stops along the way, but we now have a development plan that will positively impact the health and wellness of the region,” said Florence Spyrow, a senior vice president for Genesis Health System. “It’s an exciting day because not only are we hosting a ceremonial groundbreaking, we’re truly breaking ground and starting construction very quickly.”

The location of the tree was carefully planned. Because the site was a former brownfield that required mediation, the tree was placed in native soil on the site, rather than where clay soil was used to cap the residential and industrial waste.

“We will be integrating a number of green features into the site and the building plans,” Spyrow said. “We’ve taken a property that was blighted and was an environmental hazard and turned it back into a useful, beautiful site that will serve the public for decades to come.”

The site will also have walking trails and a green space.

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