Highly touted Division-I basketball recruit Jerry Myles has a new home and a new school.

After one season at Davenport West, Falcons coach Mark Bigler and Jerry Moore, Myles' father, confirmed Tuesday afternoon the 6-foot-5 wing is transferring to Sunrise Christian Academy in Bel Aire, Kan., located more than 8 hours from the Quad-Cities.

Myles played with the Quad-City Elite AAU program last season, but the sophomore-to-be joined the 16U Mokan Elite team out of Kansas City this spring.

"I felt like I really wasn't getting too much better with the other team," Myles said earlier this spring, "so I wanted to go somewhere that was going to really push me to be better."

The move to Mokan was a springboard to his transfer. Several players in the Mokan program attend school at Sunrise, a private Christian institution in suburban Wichita.

"Those guys talked to Jerry about it and how great it was down there, so we decided to take a look at it," Moore said.

The family visited the 18-acre campus two weeks ago.

"It is a really controlled environment," Moore said. "There is a lot of unknown and you're always leery of that, but in the end we hope it makes him a better person and better basketball player."

Myles averaged 11.7 points and 6 rebounds per game during his freshman season at West. He shot just better than 42 percent from the field and 68 percent from the foul line.

Born in Rock Island and raised in Davenport, the left-handed Myles garnered scholarship offers from Iowa, Iowa State, Nebraska and Creighton before his freshman season was finished. He is considered one of the top 100 national recruits in the 2016 class.

"We wish Jerry the best of luck," Bigler said. "We respect the right for any parent or student to make a decision for their own future, and what they feel is best.

"We will miss him at West and hope he has success."

The family is not relocating to Kansas, meaning Myles will live in a dormitory at Sunrise Christian, the same school Iowa junior center Gabe Olaseni graduated from two years ago.

Moore said Myles received a scholarship from the school, whose basketball program is sponsored by Adidas.

Sunrise plays a national schedule. Last season, the Maroons faced schools from Florida, Indiana, Texas, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Missouri.

The academy is scheduled to play in the State Farm Tournament of Champions this November in Washington, Ill., one of the nation's top annual basketball kickoff events that hosts premiere teams and prospects.

"It was a really tough decision for Jerry because he likes it here a lot, has a lot of friends and family," Moore said. "It is going to be a big sacrifice for everyone.

"But most of their time down there is devoted to school and basketball. They don't get to leave campus on their own too much. There is a lot of structure.

"I think it will help build his character a little bit because there aren't a lot of outside influences."

(6) comments

D'port Mom

Hoopfan, it was the AAU team he was referring to not getting any better while being a part of. I wish him luck, too. That's a lot of pressure for a young kid. Hopefully he'll thrive in the environment in Kansas, personally and as a ball player.

Genfair

Jerry Myles is a gifted athlete who may indeed be more likely to realize his basketball potential in a specialized program like the one to which he is transferring. His move is West's loss. But Coach Bigler has been committed for years first and foremost to the well-being of the boys who play in his program, and then to winning. His boys basketball program has done more to revive school spirit at West than any other program there. He build a MAC winner two years ago, and there are still a number of talented athletes in his program. He dedicates countless hours serving the kids at West, and has a servant's heart.

Crabb

Hoopfan is lacking facts. We won the MAC a couple of years ago. I know we had winning season two seasons out of the last few. Coach Bigs makes players go to class and work because he has called my daughter about my grandson. I attend games and we need more coaches like Coach Bigs. I know my grandchildren love and respect him. My grandson talks about him all the time even though he got scolded for not getting homework in. I am looking forward to when he plays on the varsity. You see Coach at many West things.

Hoopfan12

I wish Myles nothing but the best. This shows that something needs to be done with west athletics. It should start with firing there athletic director. There is no way a school this size athletics should be that way. Anyone affiliated with west knows al blocker doesn't do much to try to change the sports there. For a player to say he wasn't getting better with the team shows the coach isn't pushing them enough. Everyone knows bigler helps the kids a lot off the court be he is a basketball coach and it needs to start on the court. He has had one winning season in many years. It's time to let him go as well!!

Arc Angel

Rock -chalk -Jayhawk KU or K- State ?

life's2short

I wish Mr. Myles well, and I hope he will take this opportunity to grow as a person as well. The school he will be attending is designed to help him make it as a basketball star, but unless he matures a little I fear he will never make it as far as he could. All the pressure he's under has to be hard on a young kid, but he needs to realize all the scholarships in the world can disappear if he doesn't focus on academics now.
Again, I wish you well Jerry. Please look at this as an opportunity of a lifetime. Use this as a chance to mature both athletically and personally.

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