The Capitol Theatre, at the corner of 3rd and Ripley streets in downtown Davenport, opened on Christmas Day 1920 and made it onto the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.

Here are some other facts about the almost-90-year-old theater:

Opened as a state-of-the-art movie palace with initial seating for 2,500 people.

Featured a Wicks pipe organ with 700 pipes that was built to fit a space in the building.

Designed by Davenport architect Arthur Ebeling and built by Henry “Hummer” Kahl and Walsh-Kahl Construction Co., the theater and the Kahl Building cost $1.5 million to build.

Artists who have performed there include Buddy Holly, the Big Bopper and Richie Valens while they were on the Winter Dance Party in 1959, a tour that ended with their deaths in an airplane crash outside Clear Lake, Iowa.

Ceased operation as a working movie theater in 1977.

Historically, it is an “exceptional example of the influence of the Chicago school of commercial architecture,” according to an inventory sheet from the State Historical Society of Iowa.

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Was donated in 1994, along with the Kahl Building, to the Scott County Community College Foundation by the V.O. Figge family.

Reopened and operated by Capitol Theatre LLC in January 2008, and performers since then have included Bryan Adams, Robert Earl Keen and Todd Snider, Gov’t Mule, Lotus, Leon Redbone, Leo Kottke, Superchick, Umphrey’s McGee, Lifehouse and Brian Regan, as well as shows by Ballet Quad-Cities, the Chordbusters barbershop chorus and Burlesque Le’Moustache. It also has hosted big-screen showings of college and pro football games, and the Capitol was among a handful of theaters to premiere the documentary “Blood Into Wine.”

Before it closes in June, the Capitol will honor obligations for performances by spoken-word artist Henry Rollins, blues group The Holmes Brothers, disco icons the Village People, an oldies night featuring Mitch Ryder, Jimmy Gilmer and Joey Molland, and a documentary by movie and TV star Joe Pantoliano of “The Sopranos” fame titled “No Kidding Me Too!”