[ {"id":"87362ee0-b7d6-50b4-9886-ea690663af7c","type":"article","starttime":"1511478000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-11-23T17:00:00-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"pets":"lifestyles/pets"},{"featured":"video/featured"}],"flags":{"spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"America's most (and least) pet-friendly cities","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/pets/article_87362ee0-b7d6-50b4-9886-ea690663af7c.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/pets/america-s-most-and-least-pet-friendly-cities/article_87362ee0-b7d6-50b4-9886-ea690663af7c.html","canonical":"http://tobyandolive.com/lifestyles/pets/america-s-most-pet-friendly-cities/article_f00a59dc-7c5f-11e7-aede-63d6872397b4.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":1,"gallery":0},"byline":"Wallethub","prologue":"WalletHub\u2019s analysts compared the creature-friendliness of the 100 largest cities across 21 key metrics.\u00a0","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","sweeps","newsleenet","friendliness","commerce","economics","sociology","insurance","analyst","cost","premium","pet","quality of life","pets","lifestyles","cities","st. paul"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"youtube":[{"id":"0df302b5-781c-56a3-b8e7-f72afdbc3e59","starttime":"1502227080","starttime_iso8601":"2017-08-08T16:18:00-05:00","title":"The most (and least) pet-friendly cities","description":"WalletHub\u2019s analysts compared the creature-friendliness of the 100 largest cities across 21 key metrics.\u00a0","byline":"","video_id":"RmWJtX1C5VA"}],"revision":4,"commentID":"87362ee0-b7d6-50b4-9886-ea690663af7c","body":"

The cost of owning a pet ranging from $227 to more than $2,000, depending on the type of animal, WalletHub took an in-depth look at 2017\u2019s Most Pet-Friendly Cities.

In order to determine where Americans\u2019 furry and slimy companions can enjoy the best quality of life without breaking the bank, WalletHub\u2019s analysts compared the creature-friendliness of the 100 largest cities across 21 key metrics. The data set ranges from minimum pet-care provider rate per visit to pet businesses per capita to walkability.

Source: WalletHub

Most Pet-Friendly Cities

1. Scottsdale, AZ

2. Phoenix, AZ

3. Tampa, FL

4. San Diego, CA

5. Orlando, FL

6. Birmingham, AL

7. Austin, TX

8. Cincinnati, OH

9. Atlanta, GA

10. Las Vegas, NV

Least Pet-Friendly Cities

91. Charlotte, NC

92. Anchorage, AK

93. Philadelphia, PA

94. Buffalo, NY

95. Santa Ana, CA

96. Boston, MA

97. New York, NY

98. Honolulu, HI

99. Baltimore, MD

100. Newark, NJ

Key Stats

To view the full report and your city\u2019s rank, please visit:

https://wallethub.com/edu/most-pet-friendly-cities/5562/

"}, {"id":"cf7771c4-238f-54a3-82e2-b3e371f82f8f","type":"article","starttime":"1511406000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-11-22T21:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1511438629","priority":0,"sections":[{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"}],"flags":{"spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"THANKSGIVEAWAY -- Enter our contest for your chance to win $5,000!","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/article_cf7771c4-238f-54a3-82e2-b3e371f82f8f.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/thanksgiveaway----enter-our-contest-for-your-chance/article_cf7771c4-238f-54a3-82e2-b3e371f82f8f.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/thanksgiveaway----enter-our-contest-for-your-chance/article_1a3cc5c8-a76d-11e6-b151-cfe136ba5425.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Welcome to ThanksGIVEaway 2017!","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","contest","sport","runner-up","finger","winner","thanksgiveaway","market","lee enterprises inc.","sweeps","link","subscriber"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#contest","#thanksgiveaway","#prizes","#thanksgiving","#holiday","#sweeps"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"03f9e7bb-2662-5c60-9af3-44f566750acf","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"553","height":"651","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/3f/03f9e7bb-2662-5c60-9af3-44f566750acf/5a04a2f3db334.image.jpg?resize=553%2C651"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"118","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/3f/03f9e7bb-2662-5c60-9af3-44f566750acf/5a04a2f3db334.image.jpg?resize=100%2C118"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"353","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/3f/03f9e7bb-2662-5c60-9af3-44f566750acf/5a04a2f3db334.image.jpg?resize=300%2C353"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1205","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/3f/03f9e7bb-2662-5c60-9af3-44f566750acf/5a04a2f3db334.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"cf7771c4-238f-54a3-82e2-b3e371f82f8f","body":"

Welcome to ThanksGIVEaway 2017!

Our subscribers matter to us\u00a0\u2014 you inspire us to work hard to bring you the most insightful and pertinent news and information that matters to you! This holiday season we are counting our blessings and thanking you for your involvement and support.\u00a0What better way to thank you than offering you a chance to win $5,000!!

It\u2019s easy! Simply click the contest link, enter your information and keep your fingers crossed!\u00a0 A grand prize winner will be selected from all entries throughout the Lee Enterprises, Inc. newspapers and will win $5,000! But that\u2019s not your only chance! Three (3) runner-up winners will also be selected from each Lee newspaper to win a $100 gift card! With 140 total winners, you might just be one of the lucky ones!

The contest runs from midnight (CDT) Wednesday, Nov. 22\u00a0through Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017 at 11:59 pm (CDT) so don\u2019t miss out. For more information and to enter the contest, click the link below.

Good luck and once again\u00a0\u2014 thank you!

\u00bb CLICK HERE TO ENTER THANKSGIVEAWAY 2017!\u00a0

"}, {"id":"541f09bc-fe11-53b9-845b-53cde1c006ca","type":"article","starttime":"1511383920","starttime_iso8601":"2017-11-22T14:52:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1511395704","sections":[{"recreation":"lifestyles/recreation"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Outdoors calendar","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/recreation/article_541f09bc-fe11-53b9-845b-53cde1c006ca.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/recreation/outdoors-calendar/article_541f09bc-fe11-53b9-845b-53cde1c006ca.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/recreation/outdoors-calendar/article_541f09bc-fe11-53b9-845b-53cde1c006ca.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Jack Cullen\njcullen@qctimes.com","prologue":"To submit an event for the Outdoors calendar, contact Quad-City Times reporter Jack Cullen at jcullen@qctimes.com. Hungry Turkey Run/WalkWHEN: 9 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 26 WHERE: Ben Butterworth Parkway, 5500 Old River Drive, Moline DETAILS: Kids dash (100 meters), 5K and 10K. Register for the 5K and 10K by 11:59 p.m. tonight for $40 and $50, respectively. Participants may enjoy cinnamon rolls at the finish line. For more information, including parking details, go to iowaruns.com/molinehungryturkeyrun.\u00a0","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"541f09bc-fe11-53b9-845b-53cde1c006ca","body":"

To submit an event for the Outdoors calendar, contact Quad-City Times reporter Jack Cullen at jcullen@qctimes.com.

Hungry Turkey Run/Walk

WHEN: 9 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 26

WHERE: Ben Butterworth Parkway, 5500 Old River Drive, Moline

DETAILS: Kids dash (100 meters), 5K and 10K. Register for the 5K and 10K by 11:59 p.m. tonight for $40 and $50, respectively. Participants may enjoy cinnamon rolls at the finish line. For more information, including parking details, go to iowaruns.com/molinehungryturkeyrun.\u00a0

Trail building

WHEN:\u00a010 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 26

WHERE:\u00a0Dorrance Forest Preserve, 401 Agnes St., Port Byron

DETAILS:\u00a0Friends of Off-Road Cycling, or FORC, is constructing a\u00a0multi-use trail\u00a0at the Rock Island County park. Volunteers without any prior trail maintenance experience are welcome. \"If you can dig a hole, we can show you how to build a trail,\" the organizer said on the event's Facebook page. For more information, go to goo.gl/2Ztmdu.

Christmas Walk

WHEN:\u00a012-4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 26\u00a0

WHERE:\u00a0Dan Nagle Walnut Grove Pioneer Village, 18817 290th St., Long Grove, Iowa

DETAILS:\u00a0Attendees are encouraged to bring donations for\u00a0the Humane Society of Scott County and other animal shelters in the area.\u00a0For more information about this family-friendly event, call 563-328-3283 or go to\u00a0scottcountyiowa.com/conservation.

Morning Hike

WHEN: 9 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28

WHERE: Wildcat Den State Park, 1884 Wildcat Den Road, Muscatine

DETAILS: Join members of the Quad-Cities Activities/Social Adventures/Hiking Club, a group on Meetup, the world's largest social network of local groups that spurs face-to-face gatherings in public places. For more information, go to\u00a0www.meetup.com/ActivitiesClub.

Global Fat Bike Day

WHEN: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 2

WHERE: Participants will meet at Front Street Brewery Taproom, 421 W. River Drive, Davenport

DETAILS: To celebrate, fat bikers will ride along the Mississippi Riverfront to Credit Island and back. Fat bikes, bicycles equipped with oversized tires about 4-5 inches thick, are not required to participate. For more information, including updates, go to goo.gl/c5e8Le.

Hike No. 2,585

WHEN: 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 2

WHERE: Black Hawk State Historic Site,\u00a01510 46th Ave., Rock Island

DETAILS:\u00a0Join members of the Black Hawk Hiking Club at this urban nature preserve. There are six miles of wooded trails. Water provided. Bring your own cup. For more information, go to blackhawkhikingclub.org.

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As deer hunters gear up for firearm seasons next month in Iowa and Illinois, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is urging them to try non-lead ammunition to reduce the risk of poisoning bald eagles.

The results of a recent study conducted by the agency determined the federally protected birds are dying because they feed off the remains of deer that have been shot with lead slugs and bullets.

Researchers tested the livers of 58 dead eagles collected in 2011 throughout the Mississippi River corridor in Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota and found that 60 percent had detectable concentrations of lead while 38 percent had concentrations considered lethal.

Ed Britton, manager of the Savanna District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge, contributed to the peer-reviewed study. Parts of lead bullets, he said, break down quickly in an eagle\u2019s acidic stomach and enter its bloodstream, \u201calmost immediately\u201d causing paralysis and blindness, as well as digestive and neurological problems.

\"112517-EAGLES-004\"

A bald eagle consumes fresh fish in February 2016 in a tree close to Lock and Dam 14 near LeClaire.

Those that do not succumb to lead poisoning within a couple of days of consuming the soluble metal will starve to death, Britton said.

While eagles primarily feed on fish and birds along the Upper Mississippi and other large waterways in the Midwest, they also scavenge deer guts during the winter months. Hunters usually leave behind the internal parts of the deer after field-dressing the animal they killed.

As part of the study, researchers gathered 25 deer gut piles from managed hunts within the refuge, and they found that 36 percent of the piles contained from one to 107 lead fragments per pile.

The 240,000-acre refuge extends 261 miles and covers parts of Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin along the Mississippi. Britton, a resident of Clinton, Iowa, commutes upriver to his office in Thomson, Illinois, for work. This week marks the veteran conservationist\u2019s 40-year anniversary with the Fish and Wildlife Service.

\"Upper
Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

Copper vs. lead

Although he no longer hunts, Britton dedicates time to promote the benefits of using ammunition composed of alternative, less-toxic metals that do not fragment, or break apart, as much as lead. He makes presentations, for example, at hunter safety courses provided by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

Copper, Britton said, \u201ctears right through the animal.\u201d

\u201cThe folks who have tried it and are familiar with it use it for all their hunting now,\u201d he continued. \u201cIt\u2019s just so effective.\u201d

Iowa\u2019s first shotgun season opens next Saturday, Dec. 2, and runs through Wednesday, Dec. 6; Illinois\u2019 second firearm season begins Thursday, Nov. 30, and ends Sunday, Dec. 3.

\"Ed

Ed Britton, manager of the Savanna District of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge, talks in 2009 about the Thomson-Fulton Sand Prairie Nature Preserve. He celebrated his 40-year work anniversary on Nov. 21, 2017.\u00a0

When hunting with his handgun, Luke Webinger, the Clinton conservation officer for the Iowa DNR, prefers using copper bullets because they pierce through deer with more power and remain intact after impact.

\u201cI\u2019m one of those guys that like to find the bullet after it\u2019s in the animal,\u201d he said. \u201cI like to see what it has done and where it ends up.\u201d

When hunting with his muzzleloader, however, Webinger still uses traditional lead round balls. In the field, he does not document what every hunter uses for ammunition.

\u201cMy duty as a conservation officer is to make sure people are hunting, trapping and fishing legally,\u201d Webinger said. \u201cIf they\u2019ve met the requirements, I\u2019m usually on to the next group.\u201d

Copper ammunition also is popular among customers at R&R Sports in Bettendorf, but it costs \u201csignificantly more,\u201d almost three times as much as lead, said Jay Morgan, who helps run his family\u2019s business.

\u201cThat\u2019s why a lot of guys still shoot lead,\u201d said Morgan, an avid bow hunter.

\"Eagles

During winter months when fish are not readily accessible, eagles rely on carrion, including deer carcasses and gut piles left by hunters, as a\u00a0food source.

Britton said hunters who have made the switch from lead to copper tout the value and efficiency of the latter, which is less soluble than lead.

\u201cIf it only takes one shot to kill that monster buck you\u2019ve been searching for the past 10 to 15 years, it\u2019s worth that extra dollar you pay per shell,\u201d he said.

'Just asking,' not regulating

Looking ahead, Britton doubts federal lawmakers ever will restrict lead ammunition for deer hunting.

On former President Barack Obama\u2019s final day in office, former Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe signed an order to phase out the use of lead ammunition and fishing tackle on federal lands by 2022. But President Donald Trump\u2019s Secretary of the Interior, Ryan Zinke, reversed the ruling on his first day in office, a move lauded by the National Rifle Association.

The Fish and Wildlife Service banned lead shot for waterfowl hunting in 1991, after being sued by the National Wildlife Federation, the nation\u2019s largest conservation organization.

Morgan of R&R Sports, an early 20-something waterfowl hunter, does not mind shooting alternative metals, such as steel or tungsten, to \"better the environment.\" It is all he has ever known.\u00a0

\"Everybody's used to it, so I don't see why it would be any different with deer,\" he said. \"After a while, it would just become the norm.\"

\"112517-EAGLES-002\"

A Bald Eagle flies through the trees in January 2014 at LeClaire Park in Davenport.\u00a0

In an effort to protect the California condor, the largest flying bird in North America, California became the first state in 2013 to prohibit lead ammunition for hunting all birds and mammals. The law will take full effect in 2019.

Following the release of the Fish and Wildlife Service\u2019s lead ammunition study, the agency assessed each national wildlife refuge and wetland management district in the Midwest Region for its eagle population and number of firearm deer hunters.

Due to the habitat and food supply near the Upper Mississippi, \u201cThe counties along the river have the highest deer harvest annually as well as the highest concentration of eagles,\u201d Britton said.

By the end of this year, 15 refuges in seven states will have implemented lead-free ammunition outreach programs for deer hunting. Included on that list are the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife Refuge and the Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge in Wapello, Iowa, about 50 miles downriver from the metro Quad-Cities.

In 2018, 39 refuges and wetland management districts will follow suit, introducing the initiative in two additional states.\u00a0

Britton said of the overall goal:

\u201cWe\u2019re just asking hunters to voluntarily try the copper.\"

"}, {"id":"de301e53-52c1-51d2-8925-8e07a2f2fdd2","type":"article","starttime":"1511359200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-11-22T08:00:00-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"home-and-garden":"lifestyles/home-and-garden"},{"landscaping":"landscaping"}],"flags":{"spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"How to remove an unsightly tree stump from your yard","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/article_de301e53-52c1-51d2-8925-8e07a2f2fdd2.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/how-to-remove-an-unsightly-tree-stump-from-your-yard/article_de301e53-52c1-51d2-8925-8e07a2f2fdd2.html","canonical":"http://prostoknow.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/article_baf8629a-cd61-11e7-b787-2f6de5ccc33d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Cassie Sheets","prologue":"Removing a tree stump from your yard can be a frustrating, expensive, and time-consuming task, but it doesn\u2019t have to be. If you have an unsightly stump you need to get rid of, try these painless methods.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","prostoknow","stump","botany","tree","vine","solid","remainder","copper","week"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"1650dc23-4cd6-5332-b4a8-5a1fb992ea34","description":"(PROVIDED)","byline":"","hireswidth":1280,"hiresheight":960,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/65/1650dc23-4cd6-5332-b4a8-5a1fb992ea34/5a11e3c4b9641.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1280","height":"960","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/65/1650dc23-4cd6-5332-b4a8-5a1fb992ea34/5a11e3c4b83d6.image.jpg?resize=1280%2C960"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/65/1650dc23-4cd6-5332-b4a8-5a1fb992ea34/5a11e3c4b83d6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/65/1650dc23-4cd6-5332-b4a8-5a1fb992ea34/5a11e3c4b83d6.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/65/1650dc23-4cd6-5332-b4a8-5a1fb992ea34/5a11e3c4b83d6.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C768"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"de301e53-52c1-51d2-8925-8e07a2f2fdd2","body":"

Removing a tree stump from your yard can be a frustrating, expensive, and time-consuming task, but it doesn\u2019t have to be. If you have an unsightly stump you need to get rid of, try these painless methods.

Use a Liquid Solution

Liquid stump killing solutions can help you rot the unsightly tree stump away. First, drill 1-inch holes deep into the stump around the perimeter. Fill the holes with a few ounces of liquid tree stump removal and water. Drilling extra holes around the rim of the tree will help you break up the stump later. Wait several weeks until the stump becomes spongy, then break up the remainder with an ax.

Stump Out Vine & Stump Killer Concentrate available from Amazon

Use Copper Nails

Solid copper nails are a natural way to rot a tree stump. Hammer these long stump-killing spikes into the tree, then wait several weeks for the stump to rot. Remove the rest of the stump with an ax.

StumpGenie Solid Copper Extra Long Stump Removal Spikes available from Amazon

Call a Pro

Sometimes you\u2019re just tired of staring at an ugly tree stump in your yard. If you don\u2019t want to wait for the stump to rot using the above methods, call in a landscaping professional to do the job for you. They\u2019ll be able to assess how deep the roots are, and come equipped with professional tools like stump grinders.

Find a local tree removal specialist in your area.

"}, {"id":"73a6877c-d81a-5410-9dce-aae86f4bb0f7","type":"article","starttime":"1511352000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-11-22T06:00:00-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"home-and-garden":"lifestyles/home-and-garden"}],"flags":{"spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"10 Kitchen Storage Essentials for Thanksgiving Leftovers","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/article_73a6877c-d81a-5410-9dce-aae86f4bb0f7.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/kitchen-storage-essentials-for-thanksgiving-leftovers/article_73a6877c-d81a-5410-9dce-aae86f4bb0f7.html","canonical":"http://prostoknow.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/article_eca5db96-cf1a-11e7-b1e6-8364d1453d0a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Written by Kelsey Roadruck, Houzz","prologue":"Can there ever be too much of a good thing when it comes to homemade comfort food? If you\u2019ve vowed to never let Aunt Jane\u2019s mac-and-cheese go to waste, get ready to divvy up leftovers. Here are 10 items to help you organize your kitchen for the massive undertaking of storing Thanksgiving leftovers.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","prostoknow","houzz","home","leftovers","thanksgiving","dinner","holidays","left over food","kitchen","kitchen storage","containers","food storage","food","gastronomy","storage","fridge","chalkboard","container","dispenser","enology"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"ba77b52c-f7b2-5bae-92e5-8cea0a9b434b","description":"Main Street Kitchens at Botellos, original photo on Houzz","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"500","height":"400","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/a7/ba77b52c-f7b2-5bae-92e5-8cea0a9b434b/5a14c9eee6587.image.jpg?resize=500%2C400"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"80","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/a7/ba77b52c-f7b2-5bae-92e5-8cea0a9b434b/5a14c9eee6587.image.jpg?resize=100%2C80"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"240","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/a7/ba77b52c-f7b2-5bae-92e5-8cea0a9b434b/5a14c9eee6587.image.jpg?resize=300%2C240"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"819","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/a7/ba77b52c-f7b2-5bae-92e5-8cea0a9b434b/5a14c9eee6587.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"73a6877c-d81a-5410-9dce-aae86f4bb0f7","body":"

Can there ever be too much of a good thing when it comes to homemade comfort food? If you\u2019ve vowed to never let Aunt Jane\u2019s mac-and-cheese go to waste, get ready to divvy up leftovers. Here are 10 items to help you organize your kitchen for the massive undertaking of storing Thanksgiving leftovers.

1) Covered Mixing Bowl

Sometimes it\u2019s easiest to just store something in the dish you made it in. This red mixing bowl is a vibrant display for a fresh salad. Simply cover the bowl after dinner and store it in the refrigerator.

Confetti Mixing Bowl With Cover from Houzz

2) Clear Containers

It\u2019s important to actually see what\u2019s inside your fridge. Glass and plastic are the bread and butter of food storage. This set includes 11 microwave- and oven-safe glass containers and 11 dishwasher-safe plastic lids. You\u2019ll get a variety of shapes and sizes so no side dish gets left behind.

22-Piece Glass Food Storage Container Set from Houzz

3) Labeled Jars

What about leftover stuffed olives or cranberries? Having a set of small jars will also come in handy. These small jars pack a major storage punch and their chalkboard labels will streamline shelves as you can see what you have at first glance.

6-Piece Glass Chalkboard Jar Set from Houzz

4) Kitchen Calendar

Every kitchen needs a calendar, especially during the busiest time of the year. Note expiration dates of ingredients and leftovers so your family knows which foods to finish first.

Red Chalkboard Wood Sign from Houzz

5) To-Go Boxes

If you\u2019re playing leftover fairy this weekend, keep a big stack of to-go boxes on deck. These containers are most conveniently designed with three compartments, so your guests can take home a bit of everything all in one container. Remind guests that these are microwave- and dishwasher-safe, so they can reheat and reuse to their heart\u2019s - or stomach\u2019s - content.

3-Compartment Food Storage Container from Houzz

6) Wrap Dispenser

A leftovers assembly line is never efficient without easy-to-reach paper towel, foil and plastic wrap. This kitchen storage unit keeps all three neat, tidy and within reach.

Obar Kitchen Multistorage Unit from Houzz

7) Scrub Brush

If your guests kindly brought a dish, you\u2019ll likely want to clean the container for them and reuse it for their share of leftovers. Have a heavy-duty dish brush on hand for quick and easy cleanup. This one has a built-in soap dispenser and scraper for those always hard-to-remove cheesy potatoes.

Smart Scrub Soap Dispensing Dish Brush from Houzz

8) Wine Stopper

A drunken drain is always a sad sight. Half bottles of wine won\u2019t go to waste this year as long as you\u2019ve got a stopper nearby. This shiny snowflake will do just the trick.

Snowy Holiday Bottle Stopper from Houzz

9) Food Dehydrator

If you\u2019re not up to the challenge of finishing all of those leftovers, invest in a food dehydrator to turn fresh fruit and meat into dried snacks and jerky. You can even dry leftover herbs and flowers for a lovely potpourri. This one by Cuisinart ships free!

Food Dehydrator from Houzz

10) Cookie Jar

Treat your bakers rack like a dedicated dessert station by organizing hot cocoa, marshmallows and candy canes all in one place. Put this hand painted cookie jar front and center as the cherry on top. Store holiday cookies inside to prevent a gingerbread\u2019s snap from going stale.

Owl Cookie Jar from Houzz

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Who would have guessed that whales could be lazy? Or maybe they are just really smart.

Bryde\u2019s whales, which for some reason is pronounced broo-dess, have been seen treading water in one place, just like swimmers do in the deep end of the pool. While treading water, the whales have their mouths open right at the surface of the water to suck in fish or other small animals.

Bryde\u2019s whales are what\u2019s known as baleen whales. Think of baleen as having bristles, like a toothbrush, instead of teeth. The whales usually swim through a school of small fish with their mouths open and then squirt the water back out through the baleen. That way they get a big gulp of fish and no water.

Most baleen whales do that \u201clunge\u201d type of feeding. But scientists have for the first time recorded the Bryde\u2019s whales treading water to get their fill of food in a bit more lazy way.

When you think about it, treading water for a 45-foot long, nearly 9,000-pound whale can\u2019t be all that easy. So maybe they need to relax once in awhile too. Or, the scientists think, the whales may be changing their behavior to adapt.

Where the whales were seen feeding on the surface the water has less oxygen. The scientists think this may drive the small fish to the surface, where there\u2019s more oxygen. Since the fish are schooled below the water, the whales had to find a new way to get their fill of fish. So now they do what the scientists are calling tread-water feeding.

— Brett French, french@billingsgazette.com

"}, {"id":"239a12fb-1bb6-54bc-a34d-ac12a544e933","type":"article","starttime":"1511290367","starttime_iso8601":"2017-11-21T12:52:47-06:00","lastupdated":"1511519579","priority":0,"sections":[{"simplemost":"lifestyles/simplemost"}],"flags":{"hot":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"This state passed a law that makes it illegal to leave your dog outside in extreme weather","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/simplemost/article_239a12fb-1bb6-54bc-a34d-ac12a544e933.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/simplemost/this-state-passed-a-law-that-makes-it-illegal-to/article_239a12fb-1bb6-54bc-a34d-ac12a544e933.html","canonical":"https://www.simplemost.com/illegal-leave-dogs-outside/?utm_campaign=lee_email&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=partner&utm_partner=lee_email","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"The holiday season is upon us. For most of us, that means Christmas carols, presents, delicious food and lots of family time. But for dogs who live outdoors, the coming of the holidays just means cold weather, freezing snow and long, dark nights outside. Many people wrongly believe that animals","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","simplemost","animals","animal cruelty","cold weather","dogs","laws","outside","winter","zoology","meteorology","animal","weather","jennifer nields","coming","dog","fur coat"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"18cd3269-1851-54c6-8014-74c2911ab553","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"750","height":"500","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/8c/18cd3269-1851-54c6-8014-74c2911ab553/5a16df67abbab.image.jpg?resize=750%2C500"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/8c/18cd3269-1851-54c6-8014-74c2911ab553/5a16df67abbab.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/8c/18cd3269-1851-54c6-8014-74c2911ab553/5a16df67abbab.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"683","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/8c/18cd3269-1851-54c6-8014-74c2911ab553/5a16df67abbab.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":80,"commentID":"239a12fb-1bb6-54bc-a34d-ac12a544e933","body":"

The holiday season is upon us. For most of us, that means Christmas carols, presents, delicious food and lots of family time. But for dogs who live outdoors, the coming of the holidays just means cold weather, freezing snow and long, dark nights outside.

Many people wrongly believe that animals are better able to withstand cold weather because they have \u201cfur coats.\u201d This is actually not true.

Their fur might provide more warmth than a human\u2019s skin does, but think of it this way: If you had a coat on, but you still had to sit on the wet, freezing ground for 24 hours a day, your coat would do very little to protect you from the ice-cold winter.

Adobe

That is why Pennsylvania has passed a law\u00a0this year that regulates the length of time a dog can be kept outside in extreme weather. The law (known as Libre\u2019s Law) states that dogs cannot be tied up outside for more than 30 minutes if the weather is below 32 degrees (or if the weather is above 90 degrees).

People who break Libre\u2019s Law will face a fine and potentially even jail time, a sentence of 6 to 12 months.

Adpbe

In speaking on the new law, Jennifer Nields, cruelty officer for the Lancaster County Animal Coalition, had this to say: \u201cThis won\u2019t stop cruelty but it will put an emphasis on the importance of justice for their suffering. The laws are recognition of their pain and what they deserve.\u201d

Adobe

Libre\u2019s Law was named after a puppy who was rescued from a horrific situation in southern Lancaster County. He was just 7 weeks old, but his short life had clearly been filled with nothing but cruelty and neglect. Animal rescue workers were very doubtful he would survive, even with the immediate and comprehensive medical care he received once a Good Samaritan tipped officials off to the puppy\u2019s terrible situation.

Adobe

However, thanks to the love, tenderness, and compassion of the staff at Speranza Animal Rescue, Libre lived\u2026and flourished. He is now the face of this important advocacy work for animals\u2019 rights, and of this law, which the Pennsylvania Veterinary Medical Association calls an \u201cincredible victory for animals.\u201d

Adobe

Here\u2019s hoping that we start treating these crimes against animals with the swift and serious punishment they deserve. And, remember: If you leave your pup outside in the cold for any length of time, they need a dog house where they can retreat from the weather, preferably a shelter that is lifted off the ground, like the one pictured below, which you can find on Amazon. (This will help to provide some insulation, as the freezing cold ground can sap warmth from the body quickly.)

Amazon

Consider using heating lamps and heated pet pads, as well as plenty of blankets.

But whenever possible, bring those animals inside, even if it\u2019s just into your garage. Let\u2019s make sure that the coming of winter doesn\u2019t mean suffering and pain for these vulnerable creatures.

[h/t: Good Housekeeping]

This story originally appeared on Simplemost. Checkout Simplemost for other great tips and ideas to make the most out of life.


"}, {"id":"13b221be-5397-5f97-a205-8f4dd99528bc","type":"article","starttime":"1511272800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-11-21T08:00:00-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"home-and-garden":"lifestyles/home-and-garden"},{"electrical":"electrical"}],"flags":{"spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Philips\u2019 Hue Go is the ultimate portable light for your life","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/article_13b221be-5397-5f97-a205-8f4dd99528bc.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/philips-hue-go-is-the-ultimate-portable-light-for-your/article_13b221be-5397-5f97-a205-8f4dd99528bc.html","canonical":"http://prostoknow.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/article_8c61b38e-cd5a-11e7-a887-f30dbb550a1b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Cassie Sheets","prologue":"Outdoor adventurers, backyard barbecue lovers, movie night hosts, and parents with children who are still afraid of the dark need the Hue Go portable light from Philips in their life. This convenient gadget has some great features that make it a must-have stocking stuffer.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","prostoknow","go","electricity","electrotechnics","work","hue","lover","backyard","philips hue go","amazon alexa","barbecue"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"487a4096-280f-594c-8b4f-97e3b86756ca","description":"(AMAZON)","byline":"","hireswidth":1200,"hiresheight":842,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/87/487a4096-280f-594c-8b4f-97e3b86756ca/5a11d95ada2d2.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1200","height":"842","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/87/487a4096-280f-594c-8b4f-97e3b86756ca/5a11d95ad96d8.image.jpg?resize=1200%2C842"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/87/487a4096-280f-594c-8b4f-97e3b86756ca/5a11d95ad96d8.image.jpg?resize=100%2C70"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"211","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/87/487a4096-280f-594c-8b4f-97e3b86756ca/5a11d95ad96d8.image.jpg?resize=300%2C211"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"719","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/87/487a4096-280f-594c-8b4f-97e3b86756ca/5a11d95ad96d8.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C719"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"13b221be-5397-5f97-a205-8f4dd99528bc","body":"

Outdoor adventurers, backyard barbecue lovers, movie night hosts, and parents with children who are still afraid of the dark need the Hue Go portable light from Philips in their life. This convenient gadget has some great features that make it a must-have stocking stuffer.

Hue Go Uses

The Hue Go is more than a flashlight or portable lamp. It can also by synced with your favorite music for even more ambiance at your next dinner party, or with movies for an epic movie night. The rechargeable battery lasts up to three hours, making it perfect for that backyard barbecue or camping trip. Plug it in on your child\u2019s nightstand for a dimmable nightlight.

High Tech Lighting

The Philips Hue Go can be integrated with Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, and Apple HomeKit, so you can use voice commands to sync it to your favorite music, dim the lights when your favorite show starts, or turn it on to scare off monsters in the closet. If you don\u2019t want to use voice commands, the Hue Go can be turned on by simply tapping.

Additional Features

The Hue Go has a sleek design, two-year warranty, and weighs in at just two pounds. Philips also has a number of add-on products you can use with the Hue Go, including a motion sensor that\u2019s perfect for for midnight snack runs.

Philips Hue Go Portable Dimmable LED Smart Light available from Amazon

"}, {"id":"c85322db-740d-5be1-ac45-32ff9bca3595","type":"article","starttime":"1511265600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-11-21T06:00:00-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"technology":"business/technology"},{"autos":"lifestyles/autos"},{"featured":"video/featured"}],"flags":{"spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Meet the Tesla semi, Elon Musk's all-electric big truck","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/national/article_c85322db-740d-5be1-ac45-32ff9bca3595.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/national/meet-the-tesla-semi-elon-musk-s-all-electric-big/article_c85322db-740d-5be1-ac45-32ff9bca3595.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/meet-the-tesla-semi-elon-musk-s-all-electric-big/article_f3443422-ce37-11e7-b6c5-437e660cbfe0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":1,"gallery":0},"byline":"By DEE-ANN DURBIN,\u00a0AP Auto Writer","prologue":"After more than a decade of making cars and SUVs \u2014 and, more recently, solar panels \u2014 Tesla Inc. wants to electrify a new type of vehicle: big trucks.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","sweeps","dccar","tesla semi","autos","national","business","green technology","tesla inc.","commerce","economics","semi","elon musk","regulation","truck","company","cost"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#nosale"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"youtube":[{"id":"4acfc0da-a333-55ed-b61b-18f5adf8e760","starttime":"1511213220","starttime_iso8601":"2017-11-20T15:27:00-06:00","title":"Meet the Tesla semi","description":"After more than a decade of making cars and SUVs \u2014 and, more recently, solar panels \u2014 Tesla Inc. wants to electrify a new type of vehicle: big trucks.","byline":"","video_id":"i3P6R8WsepM"}],"revision":2,"commentID":"c85322db-740d-5be1-ac45-32ff9bca3595","body":"

DETROIT (AP) \u2014 After more than a decade of making cars and SUVs \u2014 and, more recently, solar panels \u2014 Tesla Inc. wants to electrify a new type of vehicle: big trucks.

The company unveiled its new electric semitractor-trailer Thursday night near its design center in Hawthorne, California.

CEO Elon Musk said the semi is capable of traveling 500 miles (804 kilometers) on an electric charge \u2014 even with a full 80,000-pound (36,287-kilogram) load \u2014 and will cost less than a diesel semi considering fuel savings, lower maintenance and other factors. Musk said customers can put down a $5,000 deposit for the semi now and production will begin in 2019.

\"We're confident that this is a product that's better in every way from a feature standpoint,\" Musk told a crowd of Tesla fans gathered for the unveiling. Musk didn't reveal the semi's price.

Even so, the company already is starting to get orders. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world's largest retailer, said in a statement Friday that it has pre-ordered five Tesla units in its Walmart U.S. division and 10 units at Walmart Canada. Midwest retailer Meijer said it has reserved four trucks. And Arkansas trucking company J.B. Hunt said it has reserved \"multiple\" tractors that it will deploy on the West Coast but didn't specify how many.

The truck will have Tesla's Autopilot system, which can maintain a set speed and slow down automatically in traffic. It also has a system that automatically keeps the vehicle in its lane. Musk said several Tesla semis will be able to travel in a convoy, autonomously following each other.

Musk said Tesla plans a worldwide network of solar-powered \"megachargers\" that could get the trucks back up to 400 miles of range after charging for only 30 minutes.

The move fits with Musk's stated goal for the company of accelerating the shift to sustainable transportation. Trucks account for nearly a quarter of transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., according to government statistics.

But the semi also piles on more chaos at the Palo Alto, California-based company. Tesla is way behind on production of the Model 3, a new lower-cost sedan, with some customers facing waits of 18 months or more. It's also ramping up production of solar panels after buying Solar City Corp. last year. Tesla is working on a pickup truck and a lower-cost SUV and negotiating a new factory in China. Meanwhile, the company posted a record quarterly loss of $619 million in its most recent quarter.

On Thursday night, Tesla surprised fans with another product: An updated version of its first sports car, the Roadster. Tesla says the new Roadster will have 620 miles of range and a top speed of 250 mph (402 kph). The car, coming in 2020, will have a base price of $200,000.

Musk, too, is being pulled in many directions. He leads rocket maker SpaceX and is dabbling in other projects, including high-speed transit, artificial intelligence research and a new company that's digging tunnels beneath Los Angeles to alleviate traffic congestion.

\"He's got so much on his plate right now. This could present another distraction from really just making sure that the Model 3 is moved along effectively,\" said Bruce Clark, a senior vice president and automotive analyst at Moody's.

Tesla's semi is venturing into an uncertain market. Demand for electric trucks is expected to grow over the next decade as the U.S., Europe and China all tighten their emissions regulations. Electric truck sales totaled 4,100 in 2016, but are expected to grow to more than 70,000 in 2026, says Navigant Research.

But most of that growth is expected to be for smaller, medium-duty haulers like garbage trucks or delivery vans. Those trucks can have a more limited range of 100 miles (160 kilometers) or less, which requires fewer expensive batteries. They can also be fully charged overnight.

Long-haul semi trucks, on the other hand, would be expected to go greater distances, and that would be challenging. Right now, there's little charging infrastructure on global highways. Without Tesla's promised fast-charging, even a mid-sized truck would likely require a two-hour stop, cutting into companies' efficiency and profits, says Brian Irwin, managing director of the North American industrial group for the consulting firm Accenture.

Irwin says truck companies will have to watch the market carefully, because tougher regulations on diesels or an improvement in charging infrastructure could make electric trucks more viable very quickly. Falling battery costs also will help make electric trucks more appealing compared to diesels.

But even lower costs won't make trucking a sure bet for Tesla. It faces stiff competition from long-trusted brands like Daimler AG, which unveiled its own semi prototype last month.

\"These are business people, not fans, and they will need convinced that this truck is better for their balance sheet than existing technology. It probably is, based on the specs provided, but this isn't necessarily a slam dunk,\" said Rebecca Lindland, an executive analyst at Kelley Blue Book.

Musk said Tesla will guarantee the semi's powertrain for one million miles to help alleviate customers' concerns.

____

Auto Writer Tom Krisher and Retail Writer Anne D'Innocenzio contributed to this report.

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