[ {"id":"d7ad5b57-147e-59b4-ade1-bd16fb6011e8","type":"article","starttime":"1519426800","starttime_iso8601":"2018-02-23T17:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1519428188","sections":[{"solutions":"lifestyles/solutions"}],"application":"editorial","title":"FRUGAL QUAD-CITIES: Ideas for a 'staycation'","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/solutions/article_d7ad5b57-147e-59b4-ade1-bd16fb6011e8.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/solutions/frugal-quad-cities-ideas-for-a-staycation/article_d7ad5b57-147e-59b4-ade1-bd16fb6011e8.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/solutions/frugal-quad-cities-ideas-for-a-staycation/article_d7ad5b57-147e-59b4-ade1-bd16fb6011e8.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Maggie Hensler\nFor the Times","prologue":"After the last few weeks of winter, I think most of us agree that spring cannot come soon enough. Frankly, if I could, I\u2019d live in California during the winter. I am looking forward to the warmer weather and being able to send my kids outside to play. This got me thinking about spring break plans; I would love to travel somewhere tropical for spring break, but considering that it is one of the more expensive times to travel, it is just not possible for us most years. So, we try to do things locally or within a short drive. Even if you don\u2019t have little ones in school, consider a \u201cstaycation\u201d this spring to take a day or two and enjoy what the area has to offer to just get away from home. Consider even staying the night in a hotel to really make it seem like you\u2019re getting away; my kids love going to hotels. There is plenty to do around here if you know where to look, and now is the time to start planning.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"a7394438-963b-5a03-bf3c-d4dbffd01867","description":"Hensler","byline":"","hireswidth":1175,"hiresheight":1762,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/73/a7394438-963b-5a03-bf3c-d4dbffd01867/59ce7c509531f.hires.jpg","presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"905","height":"438","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/73/a7394438-963b-5a03-bf3c-d4dbffd01867/5a74f2d763121.image.jpg?crop=905%2C438%2C134%2C374&resize=905%2C438&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"48","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/73/a7394438-963b-5a03-bf3c-d4dbffd01867/5a74f2d763121.image.jpg?crop=905%2C438%2C134%2C374&resize=100%2C48&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"145","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/73/a7394438-963b-5a03-bf3c-d4dbffd01867/5a74f2d763121.image.jpg?crop=905%2C438%2C134%2C374&resize=300%2C145&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"496","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/73/a7394438-963b-5a03-bf3c-d4dbffd01867/5a74f2d763121.image.jpg?crop=905%2C438%2C134%2C374"}}},{"id":"e4162c64-a6e2-543b-9c70-bf1110a2248f","description":"As the weather warms up, head out to explore nearby parks, like Scott County Park.\u00a0","byline":"","hireswidth":1080,"hiresheight":1920,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/41/e4162c64-a6e2-543b-9c70-bf1110a2248f/5a9099382cf7f.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1080","height":"1920","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/41/e4162c64-a6e2-543b-9c70-bf1110a2248f/5a9099382c098.image.jpg?resize=1080%2C1920"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"178","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/41/e4162c64-a6e2-543b-9c70-bf1110a2248f/5a9099382c098.image.jpg?resize=100%2C178"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"533","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/41/e4162c64-a6e2-543b-9c70-bf1110a2248f/5a9099382c098.image.jpg?resize=300%2C533"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1820","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/41/e4162c64-a6e2-543b-9c70-bf1110a2248f/5a9099382c098.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1820"}}},{"id":"ffd28ddf-b6f9-5c6d-8049-a5fcf73cc6e5","description":"As the weather warms up, head out to explore nearby parks, like Scott County Park.\u00a0","byline":"Maggie Hensler","hireswidth":1080,"hiresheight":1920,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/fd/ffd28ddf-b6f9-5c6d-8049-a5fcf73cc6e5/5a9099386ab1c.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1080","height":"1920","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/fd/ffd28ddf-b6f9-5c6d-8049-a5fcf73cc6e5/5a90993869cb5.image.jpg?resize=1080%2C1920"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"178","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/fd/ffd28ddf-b6f9-5c6d-8049-a5fcf73cc6e5/5a90993869cb5.image.jpg?resize=100%2C178"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"533","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/fd/ffd28ddf-b6f9-5c6d-8049-a5fcf73cc6e5/5a90993869cb5.image.jpg?resize=300%2C533"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1820","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/fd/ffd28ddf-b6f9-5c6d-8049-a5fcf73cc6e5/5a90993869cb5.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1820"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"d7ad5b57-147e-59b4-ade1-bd16fb6011e8","body":"

After the last few weeks of winter, I think most of us agree that spring cannot come soon enough. Frankly, if I could, I\u2019d live in California during the winter. I am looking forward to the warmer weather and being able to send my kids outside to play. This got me thinking about spring break plans; I would love to travel somewhere tropical for spring break, but considering that it is one of the more expensive times to travel, it is just not possible for us most years. So, we try to do things locally or within a short drive. Even if you don\u2019t have little ones in school, consider a \u201cstaycation\u201d this spring to take a day or two and enjoy what the area has to offer to just get away from home. Consider even staying the night in a hotel to really make it seem like you\u2019re getting away; my kids love going to hotels. There is plenty to do around here if you know where to look, and now is the time to start planning.

Visit parks

If you hit some of the more popular parks and playgrounds on the first days the temps hit about 50 degrees, it\u2019s generally clear that parents have been waiting for this day because the place is packed. Beyond playgrounds, of course there is plenty to explore. About this time last year, we had a nice day and we decided to head to Scott County Park. We thought we would try to do a little walking on the nature trails, and the boys really liked it. We are hoping to hit a couple more parks this year, and with just a short drive, we may visit Wildcat Den and Maquoketa Caves.

Check out museums and the arts

People from the QCA are probably familiar with the Putnam, Figge, and Family Museum, but there is still more to see that many do not even know about, like the German American Heritage Center or the Fryxell Geology Museum. For a date night, look for local theater, live music, or live shows, like ComedySportz. There\u2019s something happening every weekend if you do a little research.

Try new restaurants

Feb. 26 to March 4 is Quad Cities Restaurant Week, which gives you a chance to try some new places with special menus. But if you can\u2019t make it this week, this does give you a chance to look at the participating restaurants and plan to try them later. Our favorite thing to do while traveling is try local cuisine, so of course if we\u2019re staying around, it makes sense for us to try a new restaurant here too. Check out Yelp for ideas, or ask your friends on Facebook for recommendations; they might give you a name of a place you\u2019ve never even heard of.

Take a short drive

If you\u2019re looking to just get out of town for a little bit, consider a day trip or even one or two nights away somewhere. There are fun things to do nearby that won\u2019t cost you a fortune. Head to Galena for a little history, shopping and dining. Even taking a quick drive to Iowa City to go the the Iowa Children\u2019s Museum, stopping at Trader Joe\u2019s, picking up some Hurt\u2019s Donuts or Scratch Cupcakes (or both. No judgement here!), can be a nice change of pace. We usually spend a day or two at Fun City in Burlington and they often have great weekday packages to make it pretty affordable.

Traveling to faraway places is just not possible for us all every year, but you can certainly make memories with your family, even staying close to home. Look around to find things that are new to you that are right in your own backyard. I\u2019m sure you can find something new and exciting to do. It\u2019s really not about the money you spend, but the memories that you are making.

"}, {"id":"f25947da-00a0-517c-a458-3d8d0a8106f6","type":"article","starttime":"1519423200","starttime_iso8601":"2018-02-23T16:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1519427765","sections":[{"news":"news"},{"local":"news/local"},{"theatre":"entertainment/arts-and-theatre/theatre"},{"faith-and-values":"lifestyles/faith-and-values"},{"religion":"lifestyles/faith-and-values/religion"}],"application":"editorial","title":"\"Godspell\" is a church's gift to the community","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/article_f25947da-00a0-517c-a458-3d8d0a8106f6.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/godspell-is-a-church-s-gift-to-the-community/article_f25947da-00a0-517c-a458-3d8d0a8106f6.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/godspell-is-a-church-s-gift-to-the-community/article_f25947da-00a0-517c-a458-3d8d0a8106f6.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Linda Cook\nlcook@qctimes.com","prologue":"Eleanor Kiel, director of music and liturgy, is in charge of a musical gift to the community: She\u2019s the music director for the production of \u201cGodspell\u201d that will be performed three times at St. John Vianney Catholic Church, Bettendorf. \u201cIt\u2019s a personal dream of mine, since my first few years of working in the church, to do a parish production of \u2018Godspell,\u2019\u201d said Kiel, director of music and liturgy at the church.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["eleanor kiel","godspell","st. john vianney","jim vrba","ross epping"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"0f1e364b-47f7-5775-803f-283b67ac7203","description":"Eleanor Kiel presents a \"gift\" to the \"altar.\" Kneeling, from left, Lindsay Davison, Grace Almgren, Miranda Miller; middle row, from left, Dick Hanzelka, Michelle Steen, Lindsay Orris and Julie Mishler; and top row, from left, Steph Bray and Andy Burman. \"Godspell\" will be presented at St. John Vianney, Bettendorf March 2-4.","byline":"","hireswidth":1645,"hiresheight":1259,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/f1/0f1e364b-47f7-5775-803f-283b67ac7203/5a8b6e6fc59ee.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1645","height":"1259","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/f1/0f1e364b-47f7-5775-803f-283b67ac7203/5a8b6e6fc4d56.image.jpg?resize=1645%2C1259"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"77","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/f1/0f1e364b-47f7-5775-803f-283b67ac7203/5a8b6e6fc4d56.image.jpg?resize=100%2C77"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"230","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/f1/0f1e364b-47f7-5775-803f-283b67ac7203/5a8b6e6fc4d56.image.jpg?resize=300%2C230"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"784","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/f1/0f1e364b-47f7-5775-803f-283b67ac7203/5a8b6e6fc4d56.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C784"}}},{"id":"ccf1b5af-7a02-5312-ad56-b0648fe3ae42","description":"Eleanor Kiel","byline":"","hireswidth":1261,"hiresheight":1642,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/cf/ccf1b5af-7a02-5312-ad56-b0648fe3ae42/5a8b6e6f6cc51.hires.jpg","presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1261","height":"1642","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/cf/ccf1b5af-7a02-5312-ad56-b0648fe3ae42/5a8b6e6f6bffa.image.jpg?resize=1261%2C1642"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"130","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/cf/ccf1b5af-7a02-5312-ad56-b0648fe3ae42/5a8b6e6f6bffa.image.jpg?resize=100%2C130"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"391","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/cf/ccf1b5af-7a02-5312-ad56-b0648fe3ae42/5a8b6e6f6bffa.image.jpg?resize=300%2C391"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1333","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/cf/ccf1b5af-7a02-5312-ad56-b0648fe3ae42/5a8b6e6f6bffa.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1333"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"f25947da-00a0-517c-a458-3d8d0a8106f6","body":"

Eleanor Kiel, director of music and liturgy, is in charge of a musical gift to the community: She\u2019s the music director for the production of \u201cGodspell\u201d that will be performed three times at St. John Vianney Catholic Church, Bettendorf.

\u201cIt\u2019s a personal dream of mine, since my first few years of working in the church, to do a parish production of \u2018Godspell,\u2019\u201d said Kiel, director of music and liturgy at the church.

\u201cHere at St. John Vianney we have talented musicians. And two priests who have gorgeous singing voices (the Rev. Jim Vrba and the Rev. Ross Epping).

\u201cWe made a proposal to our parish council last year. We knew we had certain highly talented parishioners who liked musical theater and performance. So we have 14 cast members, plus there are about 60 additional parishioners who are involved in either singing in adult chorus, children\u2019s chorus, hand bell ringers, our pit band plus a couple of extra instrumentalists.\u201d Additionally, there are quite a few people \u201cworking behind the scenes doing all the things necessary to put on a production.\u201d

The interest level in the congregation \u201cwas overwhelmingly positive,\u201d Kiel said. Auditions were held in September, and rehearsals began in October.

\u201cEveryone who wanted to be part of the show is part of the show,\u201d she said.

Although ticket prices were discussed, ultimately \u201cThe decision was this is a gift of the parish and to the wider community as well.\u201d Tickets are free, but donations will be accepted for Churches United of the Quad-City Area, a cooperative association of more than 140 churches representing more than 20 Christian faith traditions in the greater Quad-City area.

So that no one ends up sitting in the back, 500 tickets will be available per show in the sanctuary that seats 800 (although, if the sanctuary fills up, those seats with a limited view will be available).

\u201cPeople might think, \u2018Why is a church doing a musical?\u2019\u201d Kiel said. \u201cThe show \u2018Godspell\u2019 has the opportunity to touch us on a deeply spiritual level. It\u2019s the story of Jesus and his followers. It tells the story of his parables, which many people are familiar with. \u201c

Kiel feels the show has a way of drawing people in to have a more close and modern experience with Jesus, \u201cto think in a different way about how we all do continue being disciples of Jesus now.\u201d

"}, {"id":"32d2db9e-18d2-5906-bef9-50e750bbe511","type":"article","starttime":"1519416000","starttime_iso8601":"2018-02-23T14:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1519427403","sections":[{"recreation":"lifestyles/recreation"},{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"This blind date's for the birds: Jackson County adopts new swan for breeding","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/recreation/article_32d2db9e-18d2-5906-bef9-50e750bbe511.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/recreation/this-blind-date-s-for-the-birds-jackson-county-adopts/article_32d2db9e-18d2-5906-bef9-50e750bbe511.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/recreation/this-blind-date-s-for-the-birds-jackson-county-adopts/article_32d2db9e-18d2-5906-bef9-50e750bbe511.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Jack Cullen\njcullen@qctimes.com","prologue":"MAQUOKETA, Iowa\u00a0\u2014 Overlooking the vast landscape from the back deck at the Hurstville Interpretive Center off U.S. 61, the singsong chirping of birds drowns out noise from the nearby highway. \u201cIt\u2019s easy to transport yourself from the hubbub to the wildlife area,\u201d said Jennifer Meyer, a naturalist based at the Jackson County Conservation Board headquarters.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["iowa","iowa department of natural resources","jennifer meyer","dave hoffman","dubuque county","jackson county","hurstville interpretive center","garrison animal hospital","jackson county conservation board","trumpeter swan"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"02553426-7a23-59b9-82e7-2ecd1aadc632","description":"A new captive male swan, right, joined Ginger, a female swan, left, in late January at the Hurstville Interpretive Center near Maquoketa, Iowa. Jackson County Conservation staff hopes the birds will mate and raise cygnets, or baby swans, as part of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources\u2019 trumpeter swan restoration efforts.","byline":"Kevin E. Schmidt, QUAD-CITY TIMES","hireswidth":1614,"hiresheight":1284,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/25/02553426-7a23-59b9-82e7-2ecd1aadc632/5a906b826f90d.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1614","height":"1284","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/25/02553426-7a23-59b9-82e7-2ecd1aadc632/5a906b826ec2b.image.jpg?resize=1614%2C1284"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"80","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/25/02553426-7a23-59b9-82e7-2ecd1aadc632/5a906b826ec2b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C80"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"239","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/25/02553426-7a23-59b9-82e7-2ecd1aadc632/5a906b826ec2b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C239"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"815","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/25/02553426-7a23-59b9-82e7-2ecd1aadc632/5a906b826ec2b.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C815"}}}],"revision":9,"commentID":"32d2db9e-18d2-5906-bef9-50e750bbe511","body":"

MAQUOKETA, Iowa\u00a0\u2014 Overlooking the vast landscape from the back deck at the Hurstville Interpretive Center off U.S. 61, the singsong chirping of birds drowns out noise from the nearby highway.

\u201cIt\u2019s easy to transport yourself from the hubbub to the wildlife area,\u201d said Jennifer Meyer, a naturalist based at the Jackson County Conservation Board headquarters.

From the deck, visitors may see or hear the newest addition to the prairie and wetland habitat below: a captive male trumpeter swan.

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources adopted the injured bird and transported it in late January to the swan pond at Hurstville, one of 17 nesting sites in the state. The swan, which still needs a name, lost its right eye to a fishing hook before it was found about 100 miles north of Minneapolis. Wild and Free, a wildlife rehabilitation organization connected to Garrison Animal Hospital in Minnesota, cared for the cob, or male swan, until the DNR transferred it to its current home.

Those involved in the effort hope the newbie will breed with Ginger, the pen, or female swan, at Hurstville. Their cygnets, or baby swans, eventually will be released into the wild to help restore the trumpeter swan population in Iowa.

Nesting appears inevitable

This male swan replaces Fred, who died in January at the pond. He was 20 years old. In captivity, swans may live up to 25 years, Meyer said.

So far, the pair is bonding \u201crather swimmingly well,\u201d she said. \u201cThey know they\u2019re going to nest together.\u201d

But how can she tell?

\u201cThey\u2019re excluding Ralphie,\u201d Meyer continued, referring to the other male swan on the grounds.\u00a0She feeds and monitors the birds at work. The third wheel soon will be taken to a different site in Iowa.

\u201cTypically, we wind up with birds that have injuries and just need a safe place to live,\u201d Meyer said. Ginger previously lived at the Chicago Botanic Garden before she moved here in 2014.

For now, Meyer calls the new cob, Pete, short for \"Pete the Pirate,\" because of his missing eye.

The name game

Prior to mating season this spring, Jackson County Conservation wants the public to give the new guy a permanent name. They will accept suggestions through the end of the month, and as of this week, they had received close to 40 ideas.

After Meyer and her colleagues review the list, people may vote for their favorite.

\u201cThey\u2019re one of those giant, sexy megafauna that garner a lot of attention,\u201d Meyer said.

The DNR prefers the term \u201ccharismatic\u201d to describe North America\u2019s largest waterfowl, which grow about 4 feet tall, develop 7-foot wingspans and weigh between 20 and 30 pounds. Their webbed feet, about the size\u00a0of an adult man\u2019s hands, bear sharp claws, Meyer said.

\u201cThey honk and fly for self-defense, but if need be, they will rip and shred,\u201d she added.

But Fred cannot leave his open-air enclosure because his feathers have been trimmed, preventing his from flying. Ginger does not have the ability to fly, either.

\"It's very unfortunate this guy will never fly, but it's neat that his cygnets will be released into the wild,\" said Dave Hoffman, leader of the DNR\u2019s trumpeter swan restoration program.

Survival struggles

Trumpeters are a native species that nested throughout Iowa before European settlement, but hunting and wetland drainage pushed them toward the brink of extinction in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

In 1993, 110 years after the last pair of wild trumpeter swans nested in Iowa, the DNR developed a plan to restore the state's population of these migratory birds. Five years later, the first modern-day hatch of three wild cygnets occurred in Dubuque County.\u00a0

Last year, 13 trumpeters were released from nests in Iowa, which had 54 nesting pairs in 2017. In the last 20 years, a total of 590 trumpeter swan nests have been recorded throughout the state. Almost 1,200 trumpeter swans have been released since the DNR launched this project.

Sadly, Hoffman said, nearly 75 percent of the released birds die before they reach their breeding age\u00a0\u2014 about 3-4 for males and 5-6 for females.

Statewide, the leading causes of trumpeter swan deaths are power line collisions, lead poisoning, illegal shootings and disease, according to the DNR.

Swans inadvertently ingest lead as they forage the bottom of wetlands with their bills for grit, which they need to break down food, Hoffman said.\u00a0\u00a0

In wake of tragedy

The new male swan was relocated to Hurstville just two days before 32 trumpeter swans were found dead in western Clinton County. Lead toxicity was present in the only carcass that was able to be tested, the DNR confirmed last week, but other factors might have contributed to the swan deaths, too.

Lead ammunition was banned for waterfowl hunting in 1991, but its use for upland hunting, shooting sports and in fishing tackle remains widespread, and it persists for years in the environment, according to the DNR.

Hoffman and Meyer hope anglers and hunters consider using fishing sinkers, or weights, and ammunition composed of alternative, less-toxic metals, such as copper.

Meyer next month plans to introduce Ralphie to students at a few schools in the area with the goal of educating them about swans. She also will cover the importance of maintaining healthy wetlands for \u201cus and them.\u201d

The swans at Hurstville are expected to mate around the first week of May, producing eggs that should hatch in early June. The babies will stay with their parents at the pond for about 10 months until being released the following April.

"}, {"id":"ba16f7de-e160-5bea-b385-77345516b05e","type":"article","starttime":"1519414200","starttime_iso8601":"2018-02-23T13:30:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1519420443","sections":[{"recreation":"lifestyles/recreation"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Knoble: Guessing about grouse numbers","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/recreation/article_ba16f7de-e160-5bea-b385-77345516b05e.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/recreation/knoble-guessing-about-grouse-numbers/article_ba16f7de-e160-5bea-b385-77345516b05e.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/recreation/knoble-guessing-about-grouse-numbers/article_ba16f7de-e160-5bea-b385-77345516b05e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"My brother-in-law Mike Mather and I were talking over the holidays about a variety of things outdoor related when he asked me an interesting question I had not thought much about (except when back home in SW Wisconsin); \u201cwhere have all the grouse gone?\u201d When one refers to \u201cgrouse\u201d in Wisconsin, 99 times out of a 100 they are talking about the Ruffed Grouse. A beautiful woods-and-thicket-living game bird, smaller than a hen pheasant, with a short tail and wings who can maneuver through some pretty heavy cover to elude predators, and hunters. Mike is correct, they have all but disappeared from some of their old haunts in many parts of the upper Midwest, including NE Iowa and SW Wisconsin.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"6a9d42f7-11b7-5320-8d38-38ef57b2a222","description":"Male ruffed grouse drumming for a mate in spring.","byline":"Contributed","hireswidth":1334,"hiresheight":656,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/a9/6a9d42f7-11b7-5320-8d38-38ef57b2a222/5a90728807e46.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"619","height":"326","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/a9/6a9d42f7-11b7-5320-8d38-38ef57b2a222/5a907287f0994.image.jpg?crop=619%2C326%2C0%2C0&resize=619%2C326&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"53","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/a9/6a9d42f7-11b7-5320-8d38-38ef57b2a222/5a907287f0994.image.jpg?crop=619%2C326%2C0%2C0&resize=100%2C53&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"158","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/a9/6a9d42f7-11b7-5320-8d38-38ef57b2a222/5a907287f0994.image.jpg?crop=619%2C326%2C0%2C0&resize=300%2C158&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"539","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/a9/6a9d42f7-11b7-5320-8d38-38ef57b2a222/5a907287f0994.image.jpg?crop=619%2C326%2C0%2C0"}}},{"id":"339d26b3-9540-5d24-8707-f13081431274","description":"Knoble","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"178","height":"270","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/39/339d26b3-9540-5d24-8707-f13081431274/5a74d98836881.image.jpg?crop=178%2C270%2C194%2C39&resize=178%2C270&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"152","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/39/339d26b3-9540-5d24-8707-f13081431274/5a74d98836881.image.jpg?crop=178%2C270%2C194%2C39&resize=100%2C152&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"455","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/39/339d26b3-9540-5d24-8707-f13081431274/5a74d98836881.image.jpg?crop=178%2C270%2C194%2C39"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1553","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/39/339d26b3-9540-5d24-8707-f13081431274/5a74d98836881.image.jpg?crop=178%2C270%2C194%2C39"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"ba16f7de-e160-5bea-b385-77345516b05e","body":"

My brother-in-law Mike Mather and I were talking over the holidays about a variety of things outdoor related when he asked me an interesting question I had not thought much about (except when back home in SW Wisconsin); \u201cwhere have all the grouse gone?\u201d

When one refers to \u201cgrouse\u201d in Wisconsin, 99 times out of a 100 they are talking about the Ruffed Grouse. A beautiful woods-and-thicket-living game bird, smaller than a hen pheasant, with a short tail and wings who can maneuver through some pretty heavy cover to elude predators, and hunters. Mike is correct, they have all but disappeared from some of their old haunts in many parts of the upper Midwest, including NE Iowa and SW Wisconsin.

A bit of history as we \u201cgrousers\u201d know it about this species. Known for its excellent table fare (they taste like a sweeter and larger version of a quail) mainly due to its diet, which includes acorns, catkins off poplar trees, winter leaf buds, insects, berries, and of course crop residue if present. They nest in the forests and edges where food and shelter can be found. Their young are precocious; meaning they can fly\u00a0\u2014 at least a bit\u00a0\u2014 only a short few days after hatching so they can escape at least some predators.

They thrive in snow, sometimes exploding out of a snow cave they have created by sitting tight on the ground as they are covered in an insulating blanket of snow during a storm. They have feathers on their legs and feet for warmth. Northern climates like those in Northern Wisconsin, Minnesota and Southern Canada actually have decent populations of grouse still in some areas.

Over-hunting, of course, comes to mind as a reason for their decline, unless you have ever hunted them. You see, hunting in dense cover and thickets of dogwood and brambles, the grouse when flushed might give you one opportunity as it flies through a clearing or a cross a logging road to get off a shot, maybe. Other times you may just hear a whirr or wings and never actually see the bird. Bagging a limit of birds back in the day was a feat not accomplished by many, unless like a school of perch while fishing in the river, you \u201creally got into them.\u201d

Hunting dogs were a help, but not a must. Pointing dogs may have given you a bit of an advantage as you would know a bird was close by before they busted cover, but I saw flushing dogs like my friend, Kevin Berg\u2019s springer spaniel, \u201cJack,\u201d who could hunt grouse with the best of them. A good day saw you bag three birds each, maybe after 25 to 50 flushes, especially early season when brilliant colored foliage still clung to the trees and brush? Grouse hunting took patience, a good patterned shotgun, and a thick pair of briar-proof pants. It was not for the once-a-season hunter, you had to work for them, and it was a challenge. Over-hunting? Not likely as a demise of the species today.

How about food sources? Maybe the birds have run short on food? Well, I am not buying all that, but to some extent I say a definite maybe. More like competition for food, I believe. On one hand, farming and grazing practices in these areas where grouse numbers have plummeted have changed dramatically.

Areas that were once semi-open grazed forests are now impenetrable fortresses of briars and underbrush, like the invasive honeysuckle, so thick you need to crawl through them. Acres and acres of old growth forest have been logged of their acorn-producing oak timber, leaving less acorns to go around, and more species like turkeys, squirrels and increased deer populations to eat the acorns the grouse need too. So like I said \u2014 maybe.

Natural predators like hawks, owls, foxes, and coyotes is, I think, a definite contributor to their decline. Sure, there are more of these species than ever in the wild these days. And even other species I have written about that do not so much prey on the wily grouse themselves, but their eggs and young. Raccoons, opossum, and skunks being the main egg-robbing species. They are thick, and to hide a clutch of eggs for nearly a month from these species seems almost impossible in many areas of the grouse\u2019s range.

Decimation by lack of reproduction is definitely a way to influence a wild population of any species. Coyotes are as present as I have ever seen in almost every habitat, and they can snatch a grouse when the opportunity presents itself. So yes, predation may be a contributing factor as well.

What about that competition from other species, such as turkeys and squirrels? I actually saw the first signs of ruffed grouse population declines about the first time they started introducing wild turkeys into southwest Wisconsin. Wild turkeys now can be found almost everywhere in the U.S. and even in Canada. Birds that big need lots of food, and they also do not like nesting competition\u00a0\u2014 meaning they will destroy other bird species\u2019 nests, even eating the eggs of these competitors. They will eat about anything they can get their beaks on, and a 25-pound tom turkey is nothing to be trifled with when angry, or hungry.

\"Okay, you said squirrels,\" you ask. \"So next you are going to tell us readers that giant squads of marauding squirrels are hunting down grouse in packs?\" No. When I was younger, we hunted squirrels. Lots and lots of squirrels. They were thick, easy to hunt, and delicious.

The squirrel population was kept in balance by hunting, and these were direct competitors for the same foods as the grouse; especially acorns. Nowadays, no one hunts squirrels up in my old stomping grounds. Heck the squirrels are not even afraid of humans anymore, not even in the deep timber. More completion for food, less grouse. So squirrels being a contributing factor is plausible, I believe.

So how do we know there is such a decline in this species? Well, experts will tell you that grouse populations naturally \u201ccycle\u201d about every 10 years or so, peaking and then declining and then rebuilding to peak again. They are an easy bird to study/count. In spring, the male grouse calls out to all who can hear of his location when looking for a mate, yet they vocalize little. In calling, they actually use hollow or downed logs to set upon, dig their tails in so they do not fly away, and beat their wings to a drumming sound. You can sit in a parcel of land and listen for these drumming calls to gage a population density in spring. The telling thing is the drumming has declined dramatically over the last 30 years.

To me this is a sad statement. Any species that sees a rapid decline is an indicator to me that something is up, as any biologist will probably agree. Determining the cause(s) sometimes takes a look at a really big picture and drawing a conclusion that do not set well with everyone who is part of that ecosystem, including us humans. Solving the problem(s) once discovered is an almost impossible task, but it does not mean you have to quit trying. Managing forests, managing competitor species, and creating an ideal place for ruffed grouse to thrive is the goal. You can just shrug your shoulders and say it will not make a difference, or you can get to work on your own property or with groups of others like the North American Ruffed Grouse Society dedicated to saving upland bird species.

Thanks, Mike for making me think about this subject matter and the idea for an article. Not all the answers, nor all the solutions, but a start. Good luck to you and any others working to restore habitat for our natural world - it needs our help more than ever!

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We know it right away when walking into a great hotel room: Everything is perfectly proportioned, the bed is meticulously made and the lighting casts a soft glow on attractive and functional furniture. The rug has the ideal softness under bare feet, and the artwork is eye-catching but not overpowering. Hoteliers craft their guest rooms so effortlessly, so why can it feel so hard to replicate the same look at home?

It may boil down to a few decorating mistakes designers always notice when walking into clients' bedrooms. From ignoring clutter to failing to address mood lighting, these small errors can have a huge impact on the overall look and feel of a room. We tapped some of the best interior designers in the industry to share the mistakes to avoid at all cost when decorating a bedroom. Are you guilty of these decorating faux pas?

MISTAKE NO. 1: FORGETTING ABOUT ARTWORK

\"Oftentimes the bedroom gets overlooked when it comes to artwork,\" Melissa Warner Rothblum and Julie Massucco Kleiner of Massucco Warner Miller told us. \"Not being a public space, it's easy to get all the basics into a bedroom and then leave the walls bare.\" While people often reserve their best artwork for the living or dining room, Rothblum and Kleiner suggest putting the same attention on art in less prominent rooms: \"You go to sleep and wake up in your bedroom almost every day \u2014 so why not see something wonderful on the walls?\"

MISTAKE NO. 2: DISREGARDING MOOD LIGHTING

\"We think it's so sad when a bedroom ceiling is left bare or has a ho-hum flush mount stuck up there,\" add the Massucco Warner Miller designers. \"Have fun with lighting in the bedroom! There is no rule that says chandeliers are reserved for dining rooms.\"

For interior designer Tim Campbell, there is more to a bedroom than just overhead lighting \u2014 reading lights are also essential: \"Add indirect and task lighting that keeps the glare of light away from the eye,\" he says. The more sources of lighting you have, the better it is for the eyes (and the mood).

MISTAKE NO. 3: NOT CONSIDERING SCALE

Interior designer Trip Haenisch always notices furniture that is too large or small for the bedroom. \"Properly scaled furniture is tricky,\" he says. \"Everything looks the same size online. If you lay out the furniture with blue tape, it can help avoid a lot of mistakes.\" To do this, take the measurements of the piece you want to buy, and tape the width and length in a rectangle on the floor. You'll have a much better sense of the piece in the space.

MISTAKE NO. 4: IGNORING CLUTTER

\"A bedroom is supposed to be relaxing and breathable,\" Shannon Wollack and Brittany Zwickl of Studio Life.Style tell us. \"We suggest eliminating unnecessary items and making sure the furniture is not too large for the room.\" Adequate storage can help minimize clutter. For the items you want to keep in sight, small trays and catchalls can help everything feel more organized.

MISTAKE NO. 5: DECORATING WITH BRIGHT COLORS

Wollack and Zwickl are also careful not to use too many bright colors in a bedroom. \"We like to use calm, natural colors to keep the space serene and timeless. To add a sheen texture that is not overpowering, we suggest a natural grass cloth.\" Warm, light neutrals work beautifully in the bedroom, and a variation in textures helps the space feel softer and more inviting.

MISTAKE NO. 6: OVERLOOKING THE HEADBOARD

The designers at Massucco Warner Miller also suggest paying special attention to the headboard: \"There's no reason for boxy beige headboards. Do an offbeat fabric on your headboard, or choose an unusual shape.\" The headboard covers such an important portion of the space and should be treated as such. \"If an off-the-shelf headboard has uninspiring fabric options, have it recovered just like you would a chair \u2014 and don't hold back with color!\"

MISTAKE NO. 7: GOING OVERBOARD WITH PILLOWS

One of Haenisch's pet peeves in the bedroom is a bed that gets swallowed up by pillows: \"I prefer using four regular pillows \u2014 two on each side \u2014 and only one or two decorative pillows maximum.\" When it comes to decorative pillows, it's all about quality, not quantity!

MISTAKE NO. 8: NEGLECTING YOUR BEDDING

Another mistake that Haenisch always notices? Neglected bedding: \"If you think about it, we spend almost one-third of our lives in bed. Nice linens are worth the investment!\" Pay special attention to the quality and look of your sheets \u2014 not only will it improve your decor, but you might sleep better too.

MISTAKE NO. 9: NOT CONSIDERING STORAGE

\"When your nightstand does not have storage, things start to pile up and a create an unnecessary mess,\" explain Wollack and Zwickl. \"It's best to have nightstands with drawers that can hold books, chargers, and other necessities. We try to only use nightstands that have drawers with built-in chargers so there aren't a lot of exposed cords.\"


Get the latest on home decor trends, design ideas, shopping guides and food news, and take a look inside your favorite celebrity homes on DomaineHome.com.

"}, {"id":"af772880-05d1-519a-b9e2-50c82ad592a6","type":"article","starttime":"1519412400","starttime_iso8601":"2018-02-23T13:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1519420385","sections":[{"recreation":"lifestyles/recreation"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Outdoors calendar","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/recreation/article_af772880-05d1-519a-b9e2-50c82ad592a6.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/recreation/outdoors-calendar/article_af772880-05d1-519a-b9e2-50c82ad592a6.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/recreation/outdoors-calendar/article_af772880-05d1-519a-b9e2-50c82ad592a6.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Jack Cullen\njcullen@qctimes.com","prologue":"To submit an event for the Outdoors calendar, contact Quad-City Times reporter Jack Cullen at\u00a0jcullen@qctimes.com. Winter Iowa Senior Games\u00a0WHEN:\u00a0Today and tomorrow WHERE:\u00a0Quad-Cities DETAILS:\u00a0Go to\u00a0www.iowaseniorgames.org/WinterIowaSeniorGames\u00a0for more details about various events.\u00a0\u00a0 Monarch Habitat WorkshopWHEN:\u00a06 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 28 WHERE:\u00a0Hurstville Interpretive Center, 18670 63rd St., Maquoketa, Iowa DETAILS:\u00a0Learn about monarch butterfly biology, beneficial monarch plants and best management practices for monarch habitat. Call the Jackson County Conservation Board at 563-652-3783 to RSVP. Winter Fishing TournamentWHEN:\u00a08 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday, March 3 WHERE:\u00a0Rock Island Conservation Club,\u00a02421 Big Island Road, Milan DETAILS:\u00a0This tournament is open to club members and their guests. Non-members also may join the club the morning of the event to participate. Registration costs $10. Competitors will fish on ice or from shore if there is open water. Go to\u00a0riccnews.com\u00a0for further details. Guided Nature HikeWHEN:\u00a09-10 a.m. Saturday, March 3 WHERE:\u00a0Nahant Marsh,\u00a04220 Wapello Ave., Davenport DETAILS:\u00a0Participants can join a Naturalist for a guided hike along the trails at the Marsh. Hikes are offered on the first Saturday of the month and give visitors an opportunity to experience the environmental changes as the plants and wildlife adapt to the seasons. Suggested $5 donation. Call\u00a0563-336-3373 for more information.\u00a0\u00a0 Hike No. 2,597\u00a0WHEN: 2:30 p.m. Saturday, March 3 WHERE: Hennepin Canal Parkway, Big Island Road, Milan DETAILS:\u00a0Join members of the Black Hawk Hiking Club on this walk along the Milan section of the Hennepin Canal Parkway. Water provided; bring your own cup. Go to blackhawkhikingclub.org for more information.\u00a0 Cabin fever dayWHEN: 1-4 p.m. Saturday, March 10 WHERE: Mississippi River Eco Tourism Center, 3942 291st St., Camanche DETAILS: Students in grades 4-6 are invited to spend the afternoon outside, practicing archery, orienteering and other activities. Cost is $5 per student. Register at goo.gl/SeuYrj. Hike No. 2,598WHEN:\u00a02:30 p.m. Saturday, March 10\u00a0WHERE:Albany Mounds State Historic Site\u00a0DETAILS:\u00a0Join members of the Black Hawk Hiking Club at this 200-acre preserve, home to American Indian burial mounds. Go to\u00a0blackhawkhikingclub.org\u00a0for more information.\u00a0Bike Swap & Outdoor Gear Sale","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"af772880-05d1-519a-b9e2-50c82ad592a6","body":"

To submit an event for the Outdoors calendar, contact Quad-City Times reporter Jack Cullen at\u00a0jcullen@qctimes.com.

Winter Iowa Senior Games\u00a0

WHEN:\u00a0Today and tomorrow

WHERE:\u00a0Quad-Cities

DETAILS:\u00a0Go to\u00a0www.iowaseniorgames.org/WinterIowaSeniorGames\u00a0for more details about various events.\u00a0\u00a0

Monarch Habitat Workshop

WHEN:\u00a06 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 28

WHERE:\u00a0Hurstville Interpretive Center, 18670 63rd St., Maquoketa, Iowa

DETAILS:\u00a0Learn about monarch butterfly biology, beneficial monarch plants and best management practices for monarch habitat. Call the Jackson County Conservation Board at 563-652-3783 to RSVP.

Winter Fishing Tournament

WHEN:\u00a08 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday, March 3

WHERE:\u00a0Rock Island Conservation Club,\u00a02421 Big Island Road, Milan

DETAILS:\u00a0This tournament is open to club members and their guests. Non-members also may join the club the morning of the event to participate. Registration costs $10. Competitors will fish on ice or from shore if there is open water. Go to\u00a0riccnews.com\u00a0for further details.

Guided Nature Hike

WHEN:\u00a09-10 a.m. Saturday, March 3

WHERE:\u00a0Nahant Marsh,\u00a04220 Wapello Ave., Davenport

DETAILS:\u00a0Participants can join a Naturalist for a guided hike along the trails at the Marsh. Hikes are offered on the first Saturday of the month and give visitors an opportunity to experience the environmental changes as the plants and wildlife adapt to the seasons. Suggested $5 donation. Call\u00a0563-336-3373 for more information.\u00a0\u00a0

Hike No. 2,597\u00a0

WHEN: 2:30 p.m. Saturday, March 3

WHERE: Hennepin Canal Parkway, Big Island Road, Milan

DETAILS:\u00a0Join members of the Black Hawk Hiking Club on this walk along the Milan section of the Hennepin Canal Parkway. Water provided; bring your own cup. Go to blackhawkhikingclub.org for more information.\u00a0

Cabin fever day

WHEN: 1-4 p.m. Saturday, March 10

WHERE: Mississippi River Eco Tourism Center, 3942 291st St., Camanche

DETAILS: Students in grades 4-6 are invited to spend the afternoon outside, practicing archery, orienteering and other activities. Cost is $5 per student. Register at goo.gl/SeuYrj.

Hike No. 2,598

WHEN:\u00a02:30 p.m. Saturday, March 10
\u00a0
WHERE:Albany Mounds State Historic Site
\u00a0
DETAILS:\u00a0Join members of the Black Hawk Hiking Club at this 200-acre preserve, home to American Indian burial mounds. Go to\u00a0blackhawkhikingclub.org\u00a0for more information.\u00a0

Bike Swap & Outdoor Gear Sale

WHEN:\u00a012-3 p.m. Sunday, March 11

WHERE:\u00a0The Village Theater, 2113 E. 11th St., Davenport

DETAILS:\u00a0Time to spring clean and gear up for summer. All bike and outdoor gear welcome. Free to sell and free to enter. Contact Friends of Off-Road Cycling at events@qcforc.org to RSVP for selling space.\u00a0

St. Patrick's Day Race

WHEN: Saturday morning, March 17

WHERE: Downtown Davenport

DETAILS: The 36th annual race will benefit the Center for Active Seniors, or CASI, in Davenport. Event features three races, including a tot trot, one-mile family fun run and 5K. Go to goo.gl/CEgsRm for more information.\u00a0

"}, {"id":"deee42df-bef8-5d2d-bf2f-b60942521669","type":"article","starttime":"1519405200","starttime_iso8601":"2018-02-23T11:00:00-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"olympics":"sports/olympics"},{"recreation":"lifestyles/recreation"}],"flags":{"spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Observing Olympians can improve your performance","url":"http://qctimes.com/sports/olympics/article_deee42df-bef8-5d2d-bf2f-b60942521669.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/sports/olympics/observing-olympians-can-improve-your-performance/article_deee42df-bef8-5d2d-bf2f-b60942521669.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/sports/olympics/observing-olympians-can-improve-your-performance/article_1abef908-180a-11e8-9feb-9778c13f0770.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Wina Sturgeon, Adventure Sports Weekly","prologue":"You don't have to be a competitive athlete to learn from an Olympic gold medalist.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","olympics2018","tns","olympics","athlete","sport","anatomy","cycling","american football","shoulder","champion","practice","elbow","knee","skill"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#mct"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"0f30b797-837f-5d64-9316-4da4982fb811","description":"Kikkan Randall of the United States wins her heat in women's team sprint freestyle cross-country skiing at the Winter Olympics in South Korea. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)","byline":"","hireswidth":3669,"hiresheight":2752,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/f3/0f30b797-837f-5d64-9316-4da4982fb811/5a8f2604674db.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1662","height":"1246","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/f3/0f30b797-837f-5d64-9316-4da4982fb811/5a8f260465b18.image.jpg?resize=1662%2C1246"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/f3/0f30b797-837f-5d64-9316-4da4982fb811/5a8f260465b18.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/f3/0f30b797-837f-5d64-9316-4da4982fb811/5a8f260465b18.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/f3/0f30b797-837f-5d64-9316-4da4982fb811/5a8f260465b18.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C768"}}},{"id":"de56c6bf-16af-534b-b27e-1f02832797cf","description":"The United States' Mikaela Shiffrin competes in the women's combined slalom at the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)","byline":"","hireswidth":4577,"hiresheight":3013,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/e5/de56c6bf-16af-534b-b27e-1f02832797cf/5a8f2605a92d8.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1774","height":"1167","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/e5/de56c6bf-16af-534b-b27e-1f02832797cf/5a8f2605a738e.image.jpg?resize=1774%2C1167"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/e5/de56c6bf-16af-534b-b27e-1f02832797cf/5a8f2605a738e.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"197","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/e5/de56c6bf-16af-534b-b27e-1f02832797cf/5a8f2605a738e.image.jpg?resize=300%2C197"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"674","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/e5/de56c6bf-16af-534b-b27e-1f02832797cf/5a8f2605a738e.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C674"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"deee42df-bef8-5d2d-bf2f-b60942521669","body":"

Almost every mainstream sport, and some not so mainstream, are in the winter or summer Olympics. That means almost every sport has one or more Olympic champions. If you can find a video of that champion's winning performance, you've got a guidebook for improving your results in your own sport.

Start by searching online for a video clip of your sport's medal winner. It may not be an individual you are looking for, but a team. If so, look for a team from a winning country. While NFL football is not an Olympic sport, rugby is, and it's a similar sport.

You don't have to be a competitive athlete to learn from a gold medalist. Even if you're only a weekend warrior or just enjoy doing your sport on your own, you'll enjoy it much more if you improve your skills, whether that involves snow riding, playing basketball for fun or using a bike for commuting.

\"Pyeongchang

Kikkan Randall of the United States wins her heat in women's team sprint freestyle cross-country skiing at the Winter Olympics in South Korea. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

To use an elite athlete to build your own performance, start by focusing on how that athlete moves. Do they hold their head forward or back? Analyze tiny details. If the athlete's chin is ahead of his or her chest, the head is forward. If the back of the head is in a straight line with the spine, the head is centered. If the chin tilts upward, the head is back.

The head is a major indicator of moves in a sport because where the eyes go, the body follows. That's why ski racers look several gates in front of them as they make their way down a race course, or an elite mountain biker turns his or her head to look at the trail in front, never looking down at the part of the trail over which the biker is riding.

Look at how the athlete you are learning from positions major joints. Knees may be held side by side, or one knee may be behind the other, or bent sideways to make a more supportive angle.

Look at the shoulders. Are they level, or does one shoulder dip when making a particular move? Analyze how they turn their core. In most winter sports, the legs and feet may be pointing in one direction while the upper body is turned to a different direction. This is especially true in hockey and ski racing.

\"Pyeongchang

The United States' Mikaela Shiffrin competes in the women's combined slalom at the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

For summer sports like cycling, examine where the head is held in relation to the knees and the toes.

Once you've analyzed major movements that are obvious, look for subtler moves. For example, if basketball is your sport and you're watching athletes on a pro team play, look to see whether arms come up at the same time the feet leave the floor, or whether the shoulders lift first before the feet leave the floor. If cycling or another kind of bike riding is your game, examine the position of the leg coming up on the back pedal. Look at the muscles; is that leg helping to pull up the pedal?

Don't try to learn everything about your chosen Olympian's entire position at once. You'll never be able to put all that information into your practice. Select one particular detail, then go out and practice it.

What you should be doing is something called \"focused practice.\" Let's say you've been holding your elbows close to your body in the game, but you've realized that elite athletes and Olympians in the sport hold their elbows spread out more. So train and practice your sport as usual, but focus constantly on extending your elbows away from your body, rather than close to your sides.

It takes a skilled eye to notice small and subtle details in the moves of the athlete (or athletes) you want to emulate, but the skill of observation will also come with practice. As you note each detail and perform focused practice to concentrate on placing the move in your muscle memory, your sporting skills will expand and turn you into a much better athlete.

"}, {"id":"8bc39aa5-d598-5dac-890b-c00524227718","type":"article","starttime":"1519394400","starttime_iso8601":"2018-02-23T08:00:00-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"home-and-garden":"lifestyles/home-and-garden"},{"electrical":"electrical"}],"flags":{"spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"3 space-saving wall mounted lights","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/article_8bc39aa5-d598-5dac-890b-c00524227718.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/space-saving-wall-mounted-lights/article_8bc39aa5-d598-5dac-890b-c00524227718.html","canonical":"http://prostoknow.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/article_9843304c-167a-11e8-8254-bfc8e166edee.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Cassie Sheets","prologue":"Great lighting can bring up any room, but if you\u2019re trying to save precious floor space, filling the room with lamps isn\u2019t always an option. These wall mounted lights offer a stylish space-saving solution. Let there be light!","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","prostoknow","wall lamp","interior decoration","furniture","lamp","design","amazon","wall","lights","lighting"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"d481e29b-c85c-5455-a4a6-a2598108e542","description":"(AMAZON) We hope you enjoy the products we recommend. We may receive a commission if you purchase a product mentioned in this article.","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"999","height":"665","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/48/d481e29b-c85c-5455-a4a6-a2598108e542/5a8c89d17723b.image.jpg?resize=999%2C665"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/48/d481e29b-c85c-5455-a4a6-a2598108e542/5a8c89d17723b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/48/d481e29b-c85c-5455-a4a6-a2598108e542/5a8c89d17723b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/48/d481e29b-c85c-5455-a4a6-a2598108e542/5a8c89d17723b.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"8bc39aa5-d598-5dac-890b-c00524227718","body":"

Great lighting can bring up any room, but if you\u2019re trying to save precious floor space, filling the room with lamps isn\u2019t always an option. These wall mounted lights offer a stylish space-saving solution. Let there be light!

1) Antique Brass

These antique-look wall lamps have a swing arm and come in a set of two, making them perfect for late night reading in bed. The black and antique brass finishes add a sophisticated touch to any room, and the eight-foot cords mean you won\u2019t need to call an electrician for installation.

360 Lighting Black and Antique Brass Plug-In Wall Lamp Set of 2 available from Amazon

2) Warm Light

If you\u2019re looking for a softer lighting option, this plug-in wall lamp with a white fabric shade is the solution. The lamp also has a golden brass finish and a drop ring design that adds visual interest. At just $40, this lamp is an affordable lighting option.

360 Lighting Amidon Warm Brass Drop Ring Plug-In Wall Lamp available from Amazon

3) A Pop of Color

These playful wall sconces from DesignLED offer a come in several colors, including pink, blue, yellow, and green. If you want a statement piece for a retro bedroom, or a fun lamp for your child\u2019s room, try these fun wall lamps.

DesignLED Nordic Colorful Wall Sconce Lamps available from Amazon

"}, {"id":"32bc0326-348e-5620-8c2b-c7726e0f463e","type":"article","starttime":"1519394400","starttime_iso8601":"2018-02-23T08:00:00-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"food-and-cooking":"lifestyles/food-and-cooking"}],"flags":{"spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"How to spike your cooking game with hard liquor","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/food-and-cooking/article_32bc0326-348e-5620-8c2b-c7726e0f463e.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/food-and-cooking/how-to-spike-your-cooking-game-with-hard-liquor/article_32bc0326-348e-5620-8c2b-c7726e0f463e.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/food-and-cooking/how-to-spike-your-cooking-game-with-hard-liquor/article_445a5542-17f5-11e8-b55c-0b6f757e6192.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Noelle Carter, \nLos Angeles Times","prologue":"It\u2019s no secret that the proper libation can elevate an elegant meal. But have you ever considered incorporating liquor into something other than a cocktail glass?","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","tns","food","lifestyles","cooking","alcohol","gastronomy","catering","flavor","dish","andrew schloss","liquor","herb"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#mct"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"58ba9dc3-c307-5ecb-ab26-c99f5e1fb973","description":"Distilled liquors such as bourbon can enhance the flavor of food, like this honey-bourbon roast chicken. (Kirk McKoy/Los Angeles Times/TNS)","byline":"Kirk McKoy","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":2000,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/8b/58ba9dc3-c307-5ecb-ab26-c99f5e1fb973/5a8f02029d51c.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1763","height":"1175","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/8b/58ba9dc3-c307-5ecb-ab26-c99f5e1fb973/5a8f02029ab5e.image.jpg?resize=1763%2C1175"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/8b/58ba9dc3-c307-5ecb-ab26-c99f5e1fb973/5a8f02029ab5e.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/8b/58ba9dc3-c307-5ecb-ab26-c99f5e1fb973/5a8f02029ab5e.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/8b/58ba9dc3-c307-5ecb-ab26-c99f5e1fb973/5a8f02029ab5e.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"d53050f0-74be-51b5-b58a-df5bb1b86da0","description":"A beverage station is seen in this Thursday, July 31, 2008 photo. For an extra flair try making your own fruit-infused vodka. (AP Photo/Larry Crowe)","byline":"Larry Crowe","hireswidth":3396,"hiresheight":2265,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/53/d53050f0-74be-51b5-b58a-df5bb1b86da0/5a8f0203d7f2d.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1763","height":"1175","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/53/d53050f0-74be-51b5-b58a-df5bb1b86da0/5a8f0203d6ca5.image.jpg?resize=1763%2C1175"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/53/d53050f0-74be-51b5-b58a-df5bb1b86da0/5a8f0203d6ca5.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/53/d53050f0-74be-51b5-b58a-df5bb1b86da0/5a8f0203d6ca5.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/53/d53050f0-74be-51b5-b58a-df5bb1b86da0/5a8f0203d6ca5.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"32bc0326-348e-5620-8c2b-c7726e0f463e","body":"
\"FOOD

Distilled liquors such as bourbon can enhance the flavor of food, like this honey-bourbon roast chicken. (Kirk McKoy/Los Angeles Times/TNS)

It\u2019s no secret that the proper libation can elevate an elegant meal. But have you ever considered incorporating liquor into something other than a cocktail glass? Properly used, alcohol works wonders in food as well. Maybe you\u2019ve added wine to a sauce or braise, or added beer to a batch of chili or barbecue sauce, but incorporating distilled liquor such as gin or bourbon might be a little less intuitive even for the adventurous cook.

Rather than just getting your food tipsy, think of alcohol as a flavor enhancer, similar to the role salt plays in a recipe. Part of this has to do with the way alcohol bridges the gap between fat- and water-soluble molecules, which in turn determines the flavor of food.

When you experience a dish, \u201cthere is what you taste on your tongue \u2014 water-soluble flavors \u2014 and there are the aromas that are in your nose. Those aromas are oil-soluble or fat-soluble flavors,\u201d says food writer Andrew Schloss. These two things make up our perception of flavor. \u201cTastes and aroma equal flavor,\u201d he says.

Schloss and David Joachim wrote about the role of alcohol in cooking in \u201cFine Cooking\u201d several years ago, exploring in part alcohol\u2019s unique ability to bond with both water- and fat-soluble molecules, dramatically expanding the flavor we sense in a dish. \u201cAlcohol latches onto flavor molecules in a way that nothing else does,\u201d Schloss said in a recent phone conversation.

The pair note that water-soluble flavors include what we perceive of as bitter, salty, sweet and sour. Oil-soluble flavors come from flavor compounds in herbs, seasonings and aromatics. In a sense, alcohol\u2019s role in enhancing flavor is like listening to music in stereo as opposed to mono, allowing us to sense and appreciate flavor at a much greater range.

A great example of this is with a brine or marinade. Add a touch of alcohol, and you\u2019ll probably notice that it really improves the flavor and boosts the aroma of the ingredients. I\u2019ve noticed this especially when brining poultry. I used to add aromatics \u2014 rosemary and toasted mustard seeds \u2014 to my brines to sometimes muted effect. But adding a dose of bourbon adds its own complementary notes, while boosting the flavor and aroma in the finished birds.

I\u2019ve had the same results with curing, which happens when a piece of meat or fish is coated with salt and sugar until the proteins are denatured. Add some cracked pepper and fresh herbs, and you\u2019ll notice some flavor transfer. But add liquor \u2014 aquavit is classic with salmon, but I prefer gin \u2014 and the flavors appear much more pronounced.

And these are just a couple of examples. The same results can be found throughout a wide range of cooking methods, from deglazing a pan after roasting to layering flavors in a sauce or stew. Not to mention baking. Not only does alcohol help inhibit gluten formation to prevent a tough crust, but it also boosts the notes of other ingredients in the dough, including butter and spices or herbs added to flavor the crust. The same goes for brushing or saturating a cake with liqueur.

Another way alcohol improves a dish is through evaporation. Because of the volatility of alcohol molecules, they evaporate quickly. When you add alcohol to a dish, that evaporation transfers the aroma the alcohol draws from other ingredients. This is particularly noticeable when macerating fresh fruit. The same occurs when infusing ingredients \u2014 such as fresh fruit or herbs \u2014 in alcohol.

\"Food

A beverage station is seen in this Thursday, July 31, 2008 photo. For an extra flair try making your own fruit-infused vodka. (AP Photo/Larry Crowe)

\u201cI\u2019ve infused fresh strawberries in vodka, and a year later it still smells exactly like fresh strawberries,\u201d said Schloss. \u201cThat\u2019s why alcohol\u2019s used in perfume. Once it latches on, it doesn\u2019t let go.\u201d

One thing to keep in mind, particularly if you\u2019re cooking for kids or folks who don\u2019t drink: The retention of alcohol depends mostly on time and exposure to air. \u201cYou would think the flames would immediately burn off the alcohol in flamb\u00e9. That\u2019s what we see,\u201d said Joachim. (Dramatic and entertaining it might be, flamb\u00e9ing burns off only about 25 percent of the alcohol, according to the USDA.)

One other thing to keep in mind when playing with alcohol \u2014 particularly distilled alcohol \u2014 is to play in moderation. You don\u2019t want to get your food drunk. When poaching fruit, particularly if I\u2019m using a distilled liquor such as brandy, I dilute the liquor with water. This minimizes the harshness of the alcohol while allowing the delicate spices \u2014 I like cinnamon and cloves when poaching pears \u2014 to come through.

Just as when you season with salt, go light at first with the alcohol. A little goes a long way. You can always add more, but you can\u2019t take it away. Too much alcohol will ruin a dish, just as it can that one friend who doesn\u2019t know their limit.

But unlike wine or beer, an opened bottle of liquor will usually last a long time. And it\u2019s good to have at least one handy when the need arises \u2014 either for cocktails or cooking.

\u2014\u2014\u2014

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"}, {"id":"baea8a5f-a353-5658-b9a0-e0a336f0af6e","type":"article","starttime":"1519387200","starttime_iso8601":"2018-02-23T06:00:00-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"movies":"entertainment/movies"},{"parenting":"lifestyles/parenting"}],"flags":{"spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Movies: 10 Black history movies that tackle racism in America","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/article_baea8a5f-a353-5658-b9a0-e0a336f0af6e.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/movies-black-history-movies-that-tackle-racism-in-america/article_baea8a5f-a353-5658-b9a0-e0a336f0af6e.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/entertainment/movies/movies-black-history-movies-that-tackle-racism-in-america/article_aadf752e-1654-11e8-b8ba-f7d4bf66eaaa.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"From the country\u2019s history of slavery to the ongoing debate about immigration, race in America has always been a complicated topic. And, like many other big issues, it\u2019s something that comes up again and again in the movies, from inspiring stories about unforgettable leaders to wrenching documentaries about civil rights. Whatever your family\u2019s racial background, you can use movies like the ones below to begin or continue conversations about race. Movies can help underline key messages like the importance of diversity and acceptance. They can also be opportunities to discuss how different racial groups are depicted in film.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","tns","black history month","movies","racism","cinema","movie","sociology","show","politics","civil rights","theme","starter","drama","documentary","america"],"internalKeywords":["#lee","#mct"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"1a272f72-c3ee-5fa0-aedd-d4e2d46804df","description":"Check out these movies that address racism and other issues during Black History Month. (Common Sense Media/TNS)","byline":"Common Sense Media","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":1735,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a2/1a272f72-c3ee-5fa0-aedd-d4e2d46804df/5a8c43c00fd58.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1893","height":"1094","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a2/1a272f72-c3ee-5fa0-aedd-d4e2d46804df/5a8c43c00e9c9.image.jpg?resize=1893%2C1094"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"58","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a2/1a272f72-c3ee-5fa0-aedd-d4e2d46804df/5a8c43c00e9c9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C58"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"173","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a2/1a272f72-c3ee-5fa0-aedd-d4e2d46804df/5a8c43c00e9c9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C173"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"592","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a2/1a272f72-c3ee-5fa0-aedd-d4e2d46804df/5a8c43c00e9c9.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C592"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"baea8a5f-a353-5658-b9a0-e0a336f0af6e","body":"

From the country\u2019s history of slavery to the ongoing debate about immigration, race in America has always been a complicated topic. And, like many other big issues, it\u2019s something that comes up again and again in the movies, from inspiring stories about unforgettable leaders to wrenching documentaries about civil rights. Whatever your family\u2019s racial background, you can use movies like the ones below to begin or continue conversations about race. Movies can help underline key messages like the importance of diversity and acceptance. They can also be opportunities to discuss how different racial groups are depicted in film.

The titles below each deal with African-American characters and encounters with prejudice or racial issues, which makes them great conversation starters. But besides these titles, it\u2019s a good idea to introduce kids to media with diverse characters and stories that don\u2019t always place race at the center.

\u201cPride,\u201d age 8+

This fact-based drama about an underdog African American swim team in the 1970s deals with racism head-on, showing how the swimmers faced \u2014 and stood up to \u2014 prejudice in their quest to succeed.

Conversation starter: Have you ever seen someone in real life being treated unfairly for no reason? What would you do if you felt discriminated against or saw a friend being held back from their goals based on their skin color?

\u201cAnd the Children Shall Lead,\u201d 9+

Direct and sensitive, this tween-friendly take on how the civil rights movement turned the South upside down in the 1960s is both direct enough to hold tweens\u2019 attention and important enough to be good family viewing.

Conversation starter: What would you do if you were faced with the same situation as the kids in the movie? Can you think of examples that show how race still affects the way people are treated today?

\u201cHidden Figures,\u201d 10+

The true story of three brilliant African-American women who worked at NASA in the 1950s and \u201860s offers a realistic look at the racial tensions of the civil rights era, plus tons of positive messages about integrity, perseverance, teamwork, and communication.

Conversation starter: How do the lessons from the civil rights movement apply today? How far have we come? How are people still discriminated against?

\u201cSounder,\u201d 12+

Based on the Newberry Award-winning novel by William H. Armstrong, one of the key themes of this coming-of-age drama is the power of education reading to help overcome a deeply rooted racist society.

Conversation starter: Why are the types of books the main character is given by white and African-American teachers so different? What does the boy need to overcome to pursue his dream of learning?

\u201cThe Great Debaters,\u201d 13+

Denzel Washington stars in this inspirational fact-based drama about a debate team that overcomes severe prejudice on the way to national fame. Expect unvarnished discussions and representations of 1930s racism, including a brutal lynching scene.

Conversation starter: Does seeing racism and prejudice portrayed in a historical setting make it any easier to watch? Why, or why not?

\u201cHoop Dreams,\u201d 13+

This outstanding 1994 documentary is a searing portrait of inner-city life in America and the extraordinary, unfair expectations placed on the shoulders of many young African-American athletes.

Conversation starter: How are issues of race and class linked, especially in urban America? How does this movie shed light on those issues?

\u201cSelma,\u201d 13+

Despite some historically accurate violence and occasional strong language, this drama about revered civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. is powerful and educational, with fabulous performances, a gripping script, and important subject matter.

Conversation starter: What are the differences between a protest and a riot? How are protests typically shown on TV or in the movies? What about riots?

\u201cThe Color Purple,\u201d 14+

This intense drama based on Alice Walker\u2019s award-winning novel deals with serious themes (including incest and abuse), but it will open mature teens\u2019 eyes to the difficulties that women \u2014 especially black women \u2014 experienced in the early 20th century.

Conversation starter: How have times changed for women since the era in which the story takes place? Has anything remained the same? Why are the challenges faced by women of color different from those faced by white women?

\u201cMudbound,\u201d 15+

Following two Mississippi families \u2014 one white, one black \u2014 who live through and after World War II, this drama based on Hillary Jordan\u2019s novel paints a harrowing portrait of the Jim Crow South, inviting in-depth conversation about subjects that are as relevant today as they were decades ago.

Conversation starter: Do you think showing disturbing violence helps audiences more fully comprehend the African-American experience? Why, or why not?

\u201c13th,\u201d 16+

Director Ava DuVernay\u2019s provocative, challenging documentary about the racial issues confronting contemporary America isn\u2019t for the faint of heart, but mature viewers will find it both educational and a call to action to take a stand against racial injustice.

Conversation starter: What surprised you most about our country\u2019s treatment of African-American citizens over its long history?

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