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Walking to his job at\u00a0Augustana College in Rock Island, Brandon Tidwell often found himself staring at\u00a0a \"really different looking house\" on 7th Avenue near Old Main.

He thought of it as the\u00a0\"bathtub house\" because it was made of square panels resembling the\u00a0tiles of bathroom walls, and he\u00a0and wondered \"what the story was.\"

Interested in history and architecture, Tidwell began doing research and learned that what he was seeing was one of the 15 Lustron homes known to exist in the Quad-City region.

Lustrons were\u00a0an\u00a0all-steel, prefabricated home that was produced in a Columbus, Ohio, factory in a 24-month period from mid-1948 to mid-1950 as one man's answer to the post-World War II housing shortage.

After\u00a0concrete floor slabs were poured, the homes could be built in about two weeks, or 250 to 300 hours, and they would \"never need repainting, refinishing or\u00a0reroofing,\" according to the promotional brochures.

As a student of history and the\u00a0new president of the Moline Preservation Society, Tidwell, 36, also was excited to\u00a0learn that\u00a0Lustron founder Carl Strandlund grew up in Moline, was\u00a0a\u00a0Moline High School graduate and had a noteworthy career in industry.

Tidwell further discovered\u00a0that Lustrons have something of a cult following on the East Coast, with a Facebook page and numerous blogs, and that they are \"becoming relevant again\" as part of the\u00a0\"tiny house\" movement. About 2,500 were made and, of those,\u00a0about 2,000 are still accounted for, he said.

He cites \"The Lustron Home: The History of a Postwar Prefabricated Housing Experiment,\" by Thomas Fetters as his \"bible\" on company history.

A Westchester Deluxe in\u00a0Moline

One of the Quad-Citians who bought a Lustron\u00a0back in the day was Columbia Larsen, of Moline, who\u00a0had a two-bedroom\u00a0Westchester Deluxe built in 1952. At\u00a01,021-square-feet, the latter was the most popular\u00a0of\u00a0four models offered. Larsen chose\u00a0panels of\u00a0surf blue. Other color options were\u00a0yellow, gray and tan.

The\u00a02x2-foot square panels are made of\u00a0interlocking\u00a0porcelain-enameled steel in which a layer of glass is fused onto a metal base. \"It is not like paint or brushed enamel in any way,\" the promotional brochure explains. \"It will never weather or stain.\"

Compressed between the panels are permanent plastic sealing strips that form a gasket to\u00a0assure\u00a0an air-tight, weather-tight enclosure.

Larsen lived in the home\u00a0until her death in 1981, single-handedly supporting a\u00a0family of five boys by making and selling rag rugs and canned produce, according to her grandson, Marty Mahieu.

The home was sold\u00a0out of the family after her death, but\u00a0two years ago, Mahieu, a Moline High School health teacher, bought it back\u00a0to\u00a0rent out as income property.

A feature that distinguishes the\u00a0Mahieu home\u00a0is that it also has a two-car,\u00a0 Lustron garage.

Steel construciton, pros and cons

More than 12 tons of steel went into the home, and it arrived on site with 3,000 different parts.

The roof tiles are\u00a0made of steel, as is everything inside \u2014\u00a0wall panels, ceiling panels,\u00a0built-in cabinets, shelves, dressing tables, closet doors and room doors. The framing also is steel, held together by nuts, bolts and screws.

Mahieu says the steel construction has lived up to its selling point of needing very little maintenance \u2014 the roof is still leak-free after 65 years and the exterior has not faded. But there are\u00a0drawbacks.

While the manufacturer promoted the idea that Lustrons\u00a0would never need refinishing, the reality is that homeowners generally like to change things as tastes change and accomplishing that in a home of steel and concrete isn't easy.

A previous owner, for example, remodeled the bathroom and,\u00a0to meet today's codes, had to add an exhaust fan. The electrician \"had to cut into the metal,\" Mahieu said. \"He said it took him hours.\"

Hanging pictures on the wall is a matter of using\u00a0heavy-duty magnets.

Central air-conditioning would be nice, but installing it would be\u00a0cost-prohibitive, Mahieu said. On the plus side, the home's construction is such that\u00a0\"the gas and light bills are almost nothing,\" he added. The home also is\u00a0sound-proof.

Original features, changes

Among the original features that remain in the home are the built-in shelf with mirror in the living room, built-in drawers and dressing table with mirror in one of the bedrooms and front and back doors with frosted glass in a reed pattern. The homes also had\u00a0metal pocket doors that\u00a0maximized space because there was no door to swing out. As Mahieu\u00a0attests: \"They used every inch of space they could.\"

In addition to remodeling the bathroom, a previous owner\u00a0remodeled the kitchen, removing a\u00a0divider/china cabinet between the kitchen and dining room. She also removed the\u00a0original steel cabinets, replacing them with wood and a laminate countertop. And despite the challenge of working on the steel ceilings, she had recessed lights installed.

Lustron legacy

In its heyday, Lustron had 234 dealers in 35 states, selling a total of about 2,680 homes, according to author\u00a0Fetters. The prototype was built in Hinsdale, Illinois, but it is no longer standing. About 2,000 of the homes are still accounted for.

Once dismissed by historians as non-contributing structures in historic districts, Lustron homes have now been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. They qualify through age and their significant spot in history.

Because of shipping costs, the majority of Lustrons are located in the Midwest, with 307 in Illinois.

The\u00a0Lustron\u00a0Facebook\u00a0page map indicates that there are\u00a0eight Lustrons in Davenport, four in Rock Island and one each in\u00a0Moline, East Moline and Orion, Illinois, Tidwell said.

"}, {"id":"76e8a7ab-c058-55e0-84bb-95102757d735","type":"article","starttime":"1485549000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-27T14:30:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1485572226","sections":[{"crime-and-courts":"news/local/muscatine/crime-and-courts"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Muscatine man charged with sexual abuse, incest","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/muscatine/crime-and-courts/article_76e8a7ab-c058-55e0-84bb-95102757d735.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/muscatine/crime-and-courts/muscatine-man-charged-with-sexual-abuse-incest/article_76e8a7ab-c058-55e0-84bb-95102757d735.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/muscatine/crime-and-courts/muscatine-man-charged-with-sexual-abuse-incest/article_76e8a7ab-c058-55e0-84bb-95102757d735.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"MUSCATINE, Iowa \u2014 A Muscatine man will face charges of sexual abuse, incest, and indecent contact with a child after allegedly performing a sex act on a child under the age of 12. Thomas Brady Haulk, 32, has been charged with one count of second-degree sexual abuse, a class B felony, incest, a class D felony and indecent contact with a child, an aggravated misdemeanor.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":["thomas brady haulk","law","criminal law","crime","sexual abuse","sex act","muscatine","felony","incest","charge"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"1591de83-1d95-5334-bd0a-8baf7c2f9d12","description":"Haulk","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"260","height":"372","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/59/1591de83-1d95-5334-bd0a-8baf7c2f9d12/588c08828d91f.image.jpg?resize=260%2C372"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"143","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/59/1591de83-1d95-5334-bd0a-8baf7c2f9d12/588c08828d91f.image.jpg?resize=100%2C143"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"429","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/59/1591de83-1d95-5334-bd0a-8baf7c2f9d12/588c08828d91f.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1465","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/59/1591de83-1d95-5334-bd0a-8baf7c2f9d12/588c08828d91f.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"76e8a7ab-c058-55e0-84bb-95102757d735","body":"

MUSCATINE, Iowa \u2014 A Muscatine man will face charges of sexual abuse, incest, and indecent contact with a child after allegedly performing a sex act on a child under the age of 12.

Thomas Brady Haulk, 32, has been charged with one count of second-degree sexual abuse, a class B felony, incest, a class D felony and indecent contact with a child, an aggravated misdemeanor.

Haulk allegedly performed a sexual act on a child between Sept. 1, 2012, and Aug. 1, 2013, according to the criminal complaint filed by the Clarence Police Department. The child would have been an eight- to nine-year-old at the time of the alleged incident.

He also allegedly touched an\u00a0eight- to nine-year-old between July 1, 2013, and June 1, 2014, in the groin area.

Haulk waived the right to a preliminary hearing, and a bond reduction hearing was held Jan. 26, but bond was not reduced, according to online court records. A date for the trial has not been set.

Haulk is being held in the Cedar County Jail on a $75,000 cash bond for both cases.

\u2014Emily Wenger of the Muscatine Journal

"}, {"id":"ae068a1e-841a-55f1-817d-b54751d9003d","type":"article","starttime":"1497762000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-18T00:00:00-05:00","sections":[{"obituaries":"news/local/obituaries"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Brian and Michelle Glasz","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/obituaries/article_ae068a1e-841a-55f1-817d-b54751d9003d.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/obituaries/brian-and-michelle-glasz/article_ae068a1e-841a-55f1-817d-b54751d9003d.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/obituaries/brian-and-michelle-glasz/article_ae068a1e-841a-55f1-817d-b54751d9003d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Brian and Michelle (Marcks) Glasz of DeWitt, Iowa, died Tuesday morning, June 13, 2017, in their home. Brian Paul Glasz was born Dec. 3, 1965, in Montgomery, Alabama, to William and Madonna (Hahn) Glasz. He served in the United States Navy prior to graduating from the University of Nebraska Medical School as a Physician\u2019s Assistant. Brian worked as a PA in Canby, Minnesota, Clinton, Morrison, Illinois, and Davenport. He also managed Flying Dutchman Farms in rural DeWitt.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["obituary: brian and michelle glasz","michelle renee glasz","brian paul glasz","university","gastronomy","zoology","betty westberg","iowa city","dewitt","william","jenna henscheid"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"5accb2b6-34f0-5a48-85c5-b2a7335467b1","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"320","height":"388","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/ac/5accb2b6-34f0-5a48-85c5-b2a7335467b1/5945b59eec006.image.jpg?resize=320%2C388"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"121","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/ac/5accb2b6-34f0-5a48-85c5-b2a7335467b1/5945b59eec006.image.jpg?resize=100%2C121"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"364","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/ac/5accb2b6-34f0-5a48-85c5-b2a7335467b1/5945b59eec006.image.jpg?resize=300%2C364"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1242","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/ac/5accb2b6-34f0-5a48-85c5-b2a7335467b1/5945b59eec006.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"ae068a1e-841a-55f1-817d-b54751d9003d","body":"

Brian and Michelle (Marcks) Glasz of DeWitt, Iowa, died Tuesday morning, June 13, 2017, in their home.

Brian Paul Glasz was born Dec. 3, 1965, in Montgomery, Alabama, to William and Madonna (Hahn) Glasz. He served in the United States Navy prior to graduating from the University of Nebraska Medical School as a Physician\u2019s Assistant. Brian worked as a PA in Canby, Minnesota, Clinton, Morrison, Illinois, and Davenport. He also managed Flying Dutchman Farms in rural DeWitt.

Michelle Renee Glasz was born Nov. 27, 1962, in Estherville, Iowa, to Bernie and Betty (Olsen) Marcks. She graduated from Creighton University in 2001 with a Doctor of Pharmacy degree. Michelle worked as a Pharmacist at hospitals in Des Moines, Canby, Minnesota, Clinton, DeWitt and Davenport.

The couple was married May 21, 1998, in Omaha. Brian loved all facets of farming, skeet shooting and hunting. He had many hobbies including cooking, snowmobiling and spending time in his shop welding. Michelle loved baking cookies to give away, animals, especially horses and dogs and enjoyed bicycling, gardening and camping. She looked forward to participating in RAGBRAI each year. Michelle and Brian loved the life they shared and cherished time they would spend with their granddaughter.

They are survived by Michelle\u2019s sons, Derek (Alyssa) Henscheid of Iowa City, Aaron Henscheid and Alex Henscheid of Des Moines; their son, Gavin Glasz of DeWitt; a granddaughter, Jenna Henscheid; Brian\u2019s parents, Bill and Madonna Glasz of Henderson, Nevada; Michelle\u2019s mother, Betty Westberg of Davenport; Brian\u2019s siblings, Kevin (Ellen Romines) Glasz of Alexandria, Virginia, Eric (Teri) Glasz of Hutto, Texas, and Amysue (Matt Rosenberg) Glasz of Henderson; aunts, uncles, other relatives and friends.

Preceding Brian and Michelle in death were Michelle\u2019s father, Bernie; her step-father, Jerry Westberg and their grandparents.

The family will receive relatives and friends at Schultz Funeral Home, DeWitt from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, June 24, 2017. There will be no service.

Condolences may be expressed and complete obituaries viewed at www.schultzfuneralhomes.com

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Chelsea Dubczak, 23, of Urbandale, Iowa, became Miss Iowa 2017 after competition\u00a0ended Saturday night\u00a0at Davenport\u2019s Adler Theatre.

Dubczak, this year\u2019s Miss Metro, is the daughter of Lori Dubczak. She attends Drake University where she is pursuing a bachelor\u2019s of music in vocal performance.

Her future goals include being a nutritional therapy practitioner, strength and conditioning coach, and cruise ship entertainer. Her platform is Ladies Who Lift: Encouraging young women to pursue their strongest selves. Her talent is opera.

Dubczak will represent Iowa in the Miss America Pageant in September in Atlantic City.

First runner-up was Emmy Cuvelier, 21, of Collins, Iowa, who is this year\u2019s Miss Central Iowa.

Second runner-up was Maggie Gehlsen, 21, of DeWitt. She is this year\u2019s Miss Clinton County.

Third runner-up was Jessica Baker, 24, of Coralville. She is this year\u2019s Miss Lake Cooper.

Fourth runner-up was Johannah Vittetoe, 22, of Washington. She is this year\u2019s Miss Southeast Iowa.

Miss Iowa\u2019s Outstanding Teen 2017 is Lydia Fisher, this year's Miss Muscatine's Outstanding Teen. Fisher, 14, of Wapello, attends Wapello High School. Her goal is to be a cardio-thoracic surgeon. Her platform is Educating the Voters of Tomorrow. Her talent is tap dance.

Fisher will represent Iowa in the Miss America\u2019s Outstanding Teen pageant in Orlando, Florida, in August.

First runner-up was Cali Wilson, 16, of Norwalk, Iowa. She is this year\u2019s Miss Polk County\u2019s Outstanding Teen.

Second runner-up was Alexis Ashton, 17, of Solon, Iowa. She is this year\u2019s Miss Greater Des Moines\u2019 Outstanding Teen.

Third runner-up was McKenna Tackes, 17, of Keokuk, Iowa. She is this year\u2019s Miss Cedar Valley's Outstanding Teen.

Fourth runner-up was Carissa Johnson, 15, of Muscatine. She was this year\u2019s Miss Scott County\u2019s Outstanding Teen.

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DALLAS CENTER, Iowa \u2014 It\u2019s the epitome of the idyllic Iowa country household.

The man of the house is a former standout athlete, who earned a college football scholarship and was a starter on the only Iowa high school baseball team in the past 44 years to go through the season undefeated. His wife is a former Miss Rodeo Iowa who attended South Dakota State on an equestrian scholarship.

They have a modest ranch home on an 11-acre plot in a rural area northwest of Des Moines. Out back is a building, from which Curtis Fry operates his framing and cabinetry business, and a horse ring where Jordanne Fry gives horseback riding lessons.

They have two adorable children, ages 2 and under, five horses and a docile 12-year-old Austrian shepherd named Dakota. There are hints everywhere of the family\u2019s religious convictions. They attend church every Sunday and host a neighborhood Bible study group in their wood shop every Tuesday morning.

There is nothing to indicate that a convicted killer lives here.

Mistakes and choices

More than nine years ago, Curtis Fry made a mistake that haunts him still. In a drunken stupor on his 21st birthday, he killed a stranger with his bare hands.

On that night, he found himself in the Iowa City apartment of 75-year-old Jerome \u201cPatrick\u2019\u2019 McEwen. McEwen later was found dead on the floor of his bathroom. The exact details of what occurred are murky and open to conjecture.

Fry doesn\u2019t remember any of it, accepts full responsibility for all of it and is intent on spending the rest of his life helping others avoid the same kind of mistakes.

\u201cI wish I could take back that night and what happened to Mr. McEwen,\u2019\u2019 Fry said. \u201cI wish I could take that back. But going through all of this that I have gone through, being in jail, being in prison, I wouldn\u2019t be \u2014 it\u2019s hard to say this and really understand \u2014 I wouldn\u2019t be who I am. I wouldn\u2019t believe in God the way that I do now had I not gone through something like that.\u2019\u2019

Fry, who grew up in Wilton and briefly attended St. Ambrose University, was convicted of voluntary manslaughter and served 4\u00bd years of a 10-year sentence. Released in 2012, he now makes his living framing and trimming houses and building cabinets.

He also does between 30 and 40 speaking engagements a year in which he candidly lays out the details of a cautionary tale that redirected his life.

\u201cI\u2019ve grown up in ministry my whole life,\u2019\u2019 Fry said. \u201cI enjoy it because, ultimately in my life, in our life, God is first. Whatever I can be doing to help teach people, I will do.

\u201cWhen I go to talk, the main message is CHOICES: Choosing Him Over I Changes Every Situation. Especially the kids getting out of high school and going to college; it just kind of lets them know that every choice you make has an impact. It doesn\u2019t only affect you. I talk about how it affected Mr. McEwen that night and how it affected Mr. McEwen\u2019s family and friends, how it affected my family and then ultimately, obviously, how it\u2019s affected me.\u2019\u2019

Growing up with God

His Christian faith isn\u2019t something Curtis Fry stumbled upon after the night of Feb. 6-7, 2008. He was immersed in it from birth.

His parents, Jim and Cathy Fry, have been helping troubled young people turn their lives around through Christianity since 1992. They housed four boys at a time for two-year periods on their 50-acre farm north of Wilton.

\u201cWe would get legal guardianship in front of a district judge and stress Christian values and good work habits,\u2019\u2019 Jim Fry said. \u201cThey\u2019d live right here in the house with us.\"

At one time, they had as many as 60 boys on a waiting list, and their only regret is that they were unable to take in all of them. As it is, they helped 50 boys through the years.

\u201cWe\u2019ve got every one of their pictures up here on the wall that we look at every day,\u2019\u2019 Jim said.

For the past 11 years, they also have hosted a one-week summer camp for similarly troubled boys who have had some sort of behavioral or criminal issue.

Curtis, as the youngest of three Fry children, was a part of the effort to put those boys on the right path.

\u201cGrowing up, I was kind of that older brother, role model for the guys,\u2019\u2019 he said. \u201cI was kind of in ministry even while I was in high school. But even after I graduated, I ended up working at my parents\u2019 ranch for about a year.\u2019\u2019

On the field

The other big thing in Curtis\u2019 life was sports. He lettered in football, baseball and golf at Wilton High School, and in 2005, he was the starting right fielder on a Beavers team that went all the way through the season without losing, going 42-0. No Iowa team had done it since 1973, and none has done it since.

Fry had been a shortstop at lower levels, but Wilton coach Jake Souhrada said Fry had no problem moving to the outfield for the good of the team.

\u201cCurtis was just a quiet kid who went about his business,\u2019\u2019 Souhrada said. \u201cHe was a team-oriented person who cared about winning and the team being successful more than the individual.

\"He was a great kid, and other kids looked up to him. Good football player, good baseball player, just a good kid in general.\u2019\u2019

Fry\u2019s favorite sport was football. He played quarterback in his first three years of high school before switching to running back as a senior, and he accepted a scholarship offer to play for St. Ambrose. At 6-foot and 200 pounds, he was one of the few freshmen to see much playing time for the Bees in the fall of 2005 and was projected to start at outside linebacker the following year.

But he couldn\u2019t find anything in the college curriculum that excited him, and he quit school. A several-year period of drifting from one activity to another followed.

Barn party scene

Fry had several different jobs over the next two years, including a brief move to Texas to work as a rancher and counselor at a boys ranch where his sister, Cassie, worked. He finally took a job at the Gerdau Ameristeel plant in Wilton in 2007 while continuing to work as a volunteer leader for the Young Life group at his parents\u2019 ranch.

He began going to \u201cbarn parties\u2019\u2019 with old friends on weekends, although in the beginning he didn\u2019t drink. He was everyone\u2019s designated driver, the guy who made sure everyone got home safely at the end of the night.

\u201cThat\u2019s what there was in small-town Iowa,\u2019\u2019 he said.\u00a0

He eventually found ways to rationalize a role in the drinking scene.

\u201cWhat\u2019s it going to hurt if I have a beer?\u2019\u2019 he asked himself. \u201cIt\u2019s not going to matter. Yeah, I\u2019m underage, but it\u2019s not that big of a deal. That just kind of progressed from July until February to my 21st birthday, where I decided, \u2018I\u2019ve been this good kid my whole life. I deserve one night to just go and let it out. Everyone does it. It\u2019s your 21st birthday. You\u2019re supposed to do it. I\u2019m going to do it. It\u2019s not going to hurt anything.\u2019\"

He went to Iowa City the night of Feb. 6, 2008, with his brother Cory and four high school friends who shared an apartment there.

Jim Fry had a bad feeling about it from the very beginning. As his sons were about to leave, he made a point of speaking to Curtis.

\u201cI just told him, \u2018When God waves red flags, it\u2019s never good to push red flags or push through them,\u2019\u2019\u2019 Jim Fry recalled. \u201cI said, \u2018He\u2019s waving red flags, Curtis.\u2019 Curt being a 21-year-old said, \u2018Aw, Dad, don\u2019t worry about it.\u2019 We\u2019re all invincible at that age, aren\u2019t we?\u2019\u2019

The conversation remains engraved in Curtis\u2019 memory.

\u201cI should have listened. Obviously,\u2019\u2019 he said. \u201cBut I had it in my mind that I deserved this one night \u2026 Little did I know what actually was going to happen.\u2019\u2019

A wild night

Curtis Fry\u2019s birthday party began with some drinking games at his friends\u2019 apartment, then moved to The Vine, a popular bar and restaurant on Prentiss Street, where more beer and appetizers were ordered. His five friends each bought him a shot of liquor and lined them up in front of him. Two girls in a neighboring booth joined in and each bought a shot.

In a span of minutes, Curtis downed all seven shots. The party then moved to Brothers Bar and Grill on Dubuque Street. That\u2019s pretty much where Fry said his memory begins to fail. The group visited at least two other bars that night, but he said he has no memory of them.

\u201cI don\u2019t remember going anywhere. I don\u2019t remember talking to anyone. I don\u2019t remember if I had another drink,\u2019\u2019 he said. \u201cI don\u2019t remember anything until that next morning when I woke up. The next morning, I woke up at my buddy\u2019s house.\u2019\u2019

He didn\u2019t have most of his clothes or his wallet and was told by his friends that they had lost him for about an hour-and-a-half the night before.

There are photos taken about 1:30 a.m. of Cory Fry and Kevin Anson carrying a glassy-eyed Curtis down the street. At one point, he leaped to his feet and took off running, but his brother caught up with him and knocked him into a snowdrift. Curtis took off running again. This time, his friends let him go.

\u201cMy brother figured, \u2018Oh, he\u2019s just running back to the house. I\u2019m not going to chase him,\u2019\u2019\u2019 Fry said. \u201cSo he went back and met up with everyone else, and they went the original way back to the house. They got there expecting me to be there. I wasn\u2019t there.\u2019\u2019

Over the next hour or so, they walked the streets looking for Curtis and called his cellphone about 30 times. He answered a few times but gave mostly unintelligible answers. During one of those calls, Curtis told his friends he heard someone making gurgling noises and said the person sounded like they were dying.

When they finally found Curtis staggering down the middle of the street, he was wearing only his underwear, a tank top and two coats, one of which was wrapped around his legs. Neither of the coats was his.

The whirlwind begins

The next day, Fry felt well enough to shovel the sidewalks at his Wilton apartment complex and had dinner that night at his sister\u2019s house.

About 9:30 a.m. the following day, Feb. 8, he was awakened by police officers knocking on his door. They asked what he had been doing on the night of Feb. 6, asked if he had lost anything and invited him to follow them back to the police station in Iowa City.

Fry complied, having no idea what any of it was about. In Iowa City, he answered more questions and finally was told that his clothes and wallet had been found in an apartment. The officers added that they also found a man beaten to death inside the apartment.

\u201cIt was at that point that I just felt like my whole world was in a whirlwind,\u2019\u2019 Fry said. \u201cI could hardly breathe. My whole body started shaking. I started bawling.

\u201cBut at that point, I turned back to who I knew would be there for me, and I started praying and asked God to forgive me for whatever I did that night but also to show me what happened so I can tell them the truth, and we can get this figured out.\u2019\u2019

He was placed in handcuffs and was charged with second-degree murder.

Going to trial

The shock waves reverberated throughout eastern Iowa, striking hardest on a small farm north of Wilton.

\u201cIt felt like a nightmare,\u2019\u2019 Cathy Fry said. \u201cI thought it was a dream, and I wanted to wake up from it.\u2019\u2019

Jim Fry said the most difficult thing was watching his wife cry on almost a daily basis.

\u201cAnother of the toughest parts probably was the separation between Curtis and us, not being able to give him a hug, not understanding why this all took place, because we knew this was totally out of character for Curtis,\" he said.

Fry pleaded not guilty and waived his right to a jury trial. His bench trial in front of Sixth Judicial District Court Judge Mitchell Turner took place more than a year later. For five days, Turner heard arguments from prosecutors and from public defenders Peter Persaud and Quint Meyerdirk, representing Fry.

By coincidence, McEwen\u2019s address was very similar to that of the friends with whom Fry was staying in Iowa City. McEwen lived at 513 S. Van Buren, Apt. 1, and his friends lived at 513 Bowery St., less than a block away. Fry\u2019s address in Wilton was 503, and he also lived in apartment 1.

Turner wrote in his ruling that he thought Fry, in his intoxicated state, figured he was at his friend\u2019s apartment or perhaps his own, broke into McEwen\u2019s place, shed most of his clothes and collapsed into bed. The door of the apartment clearly had been kicked in.

McEwen was 75 and \u201chad a lot of health issues,\u2019\u2019 according to his rabbi, Jeff Portman. Various reports indicated he suffered from asthma, high blood pressure, anxiety, depression and possibly Parkinson\u2019s disease. He wore a back brace and walked with a cane.

Turner speculated that when McEwen tried to rouse Fry to get him out of his apartment, Fry seemingly thought he was being attacked by an intruder and reacted violently, punching McEwen several times.

\u201cThat\u2019s the best explanation still to this day of what happened that night,\u2019\u2019 Fry said. \u201cUltimately, there is no doubt in my mind that I did it. I don\u2019t know how it happened. I\u2019ve never been in a fight in my life. In high school, a kid hit me in the face 10 times, and I just stood there. So even in the face of aggression, it\u2019s not me, but I know because I made the choice to go and drink that I ended up in Mr. McEwen\u2019s area, and because of that, he died.\u2019\u2019

'Brutal beating'

McEwen was found to have a broken nose, two fractured cheekbones and a broken rib. Injuries on his neck indicated Fry probably also choked him.

Johnson County Attorney Janet Lyness, who prosecuted the case, said she questioned Fry's story that he blacked out because of intoxication. She pointed to the conversation with friends in which he mentioned hearing gurgling noises.

\"Do I think he (Fry) knew what was going on at the time?\" she asked. \"Yes.\u2019\u2019

It was suggested that McEwen may have regained consciousness at some point, might have gone outside briefly \u2014 there was a blood stain found in the snow in front of his apartment \u2014 and finally stumbled into his bathroom, where he was found by police.

Lyness doesn't believe that was possible either. She said McEwen's injuries were too extensive.

\u201cHe beat him badly, and this is an older man, frail, troubled balance, that would have presented no threat to Mr. Fry,'' Lyness said. \"Probably couldn\u2019t have even stood very well, probably was absolutely terrified from the time he realized Mr. Fry was in his apartment until his last breath.

\"I have no doubt he suffered tremendously, physically as well as emotionally, throughout the time that Mr. Fry was in that apartment. And it was a brutal, brutal beating. Beating and choking. The bones in his neck were actually broken ... It had to have been an extremely, extremely brutal beating.\u2019\u2019

Judge Turner rejected the charge of second-degree murder, which would have called for a maximum sentence of 50 years. Instead, Fry was found guilty of voluntary manslaughter and was sentenced to 10 years. He also was ordered to pay $150,000 in victim restitution to McEwen's estranged older sister, who is now deceased.

\u201cI was surprised at the verdict,\" Lyness said. \"I think some of the facts that the judge referenced were different from what I remembered hearing in testimony.\u2019\u2019

Many voiced their disapproval over the controversial verdict. Rabbi Portman said he thought Fry's age and background affected Turner's decision.

\"They made it manslaughter,\" he said. \"I think it was pure murder myself. I think the guy was drunk obviously, but I don\u2019t think that excuses anybody from murder.\u2019\u2019

Finding blessings

With time off for good behavior, Fry served about 4\u00bd years. He spent 15 months in the Johnson County Jail, about 2\u00bd years in state facilities (split between Fort Dodge and Rockwell City), about five months in a halfway house in Coralville and another seven months on parole.

During his time in Rockwell City, a woman named Joanne Blair visited the prison to take part in a Bible study group and was so impressed by the pious young inmate from Wilton that she went back and told her daughter about him.

It was the first Jordanne Blair ever heard of Curtis Fry, but it would not be the last. During the summer of 2012, while Fry was on parole, he spoke at the church Jordanne and her brother attended in the Des Moines area, and he spent the night at their house.

They stayed up talking until the wee hours of the morning, and they started dating about a week later. The following June, 2013, they married.

Fry isn\u2019t surprised that Jordanne felt comfortable committing her life to a convicted felon.

\u201cIt wasn\u2019t (surprising) with her as much as it was with her parents, just because, once we got to know each other, she knew my heart right away,\u2019\u2019 Fry said. \u201cShe knew that my desire was for God to be the center of my life. But for her parents to say, \u2018Yeah, my daughter can marry someone who\u2019s been convicted of manslaughter, yeah, go ahead\u2019 \u2026 that spoke a lot.\u2019\u2019

Fry began working with his father-in-law, Lee Blair, in his cabinetry business in Lake City, Iowa. About a year ago, he and Jordanne moved to the Des Moines area, where he opened his own business, doing framing, construction, remodels, trim work and custom cabinets.

Business is good. Life is good.

In March 2015, Jordanne gave birth to a daughter, Avery. In March of this year, Avery got a little brother, Brayton.

\u201cBeing in jail, my whole thought about life changed,\u2019\u2019 Fry said. \u201cIt\u2019s not about me anymore. It\u2019s about God and whatever he wants me to do, wherever he wants me to go, I\u2019m willing to go \u2026 I\u2019m just a family guy. I really am. They\u2019ve been a blessing. Jordanne has been a blessing. The kids are a blessing.

\u201cOne message that I share when I speak is \u2018All of us are going to screw up. Some of us more than others. But even though we screw up, if we\u2019re willing to admit our faults and know that we\u2019re forgiven by God and forgive ourselves, we can move on, and we\u2019re going to get blessings.\u2019 My wife, my kids, the place that we have here\u00a0\u2014 it\u2019s a blessing.\u2019\u2019

Gus Henrici, the pastor at Crossroads Community Church, where the Frys now worship, has been amazed at how open Curtis is about sharing his ordeal. He said he has spoken about it to the entire congregation and to the church\u2019s youth group, and he discusses it almost weekly in his Tuesday morning gathering in his wood shop.

\u201cCurtis had the choice to let this event define his life in a negative or positive way,\u2019\u2019 Henrici said. \u201cHe continues to choose to speak out about and share his story, to share what happened and impact young people so that they are aware of the choices they make. Curtis is not bitter or angry but quick to share that he has received grace and quick to share that same grace with others.\u2019\u2019

Moving forward

The people who know and love Fry aren\u2019t at all surprised that he has risen above a choice and a chain of events that might have ruined his life.

\u201cIt was not his character from the very beginning,\u2019\u2019 his father said. \u201cIt was a one-night choice. It broke our hearts, but we had to go through it. I knew he\u2019d be successful when he got out and had paid his time.\u2019\u2019

Cathy Fry, who came up with the CHOICES acronym that her son uses in his ministry, said the family\u2019s faith is the only thing that carried them through. She is thinking of writing a book to help other mothers cope with crises such as this.

She said that night in 2008 still comes up in conversation sometimes.

\u201cWe\u2019re not just going to shove it under a rug and forget about it,\u2019\u2019 she said. \u201cWe\u2019re going to use it for God\u2019s glory.\u2019\u2019

Curtis would love to speak with friends or family members of Patrick McEwen to express his remorse. He said he was prohibited from doing so by a no-contact order and was advised that it wouldn\u2019t be a good idea.

McEwen does not have any surviving relatives, only a few friends and acquaintances from his synagogue who still are baffled and bothered by how things played out in court. Rabbi Portman said he hopes Fry learned from his mistake.

\u201cHe\u2019s getting a second chance, and I hope he makes the most of it,\u2019\u2019 he said.

Fry knows there always will be people who say he got off easy; that he didn\u2019t get what was really coming to him.

\u201cI would say everyone has the right to their opinion,\u2019\u2019 Fry said. \u201cI know what happened that night was wrong. But I also know that God is able to use our mistakes and make something good out of them.

\u201cI can\u2019t dwell on what other people think of it. I just know it was enough time for me to realize my mistake and move on from there. Knowing that God forgave me, I was able to forgive myself for what I did to Mr. McEwen, and now all I can do is move forward and live the best I can.\u2019\u2019

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States' rights be damned.\u00a0

Those are the Cliffs Notes of U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions' letter to Congress that could undermine burgeoning medical marijuana programs in Iowa and Illinois.

In a letter to Congress made public last week, Sessions sought the lifting of protections from federal prosecution for state-run programs. And the entire basis for Sessions' argument for a federal crackdown flies in the face of accepted science.

No surprises there.

Sessions talks of a \"drug crisis.\" He mentions spiking crime. And likens state-licensed growers to \"dangerous drug traffickers who threaten American lives.\"

Apparently, the U.S. attorney general isn't one for nuance.

The \"drug crisis\" Sessions hits has nothing to do with medical marijuana. It's an opiate epidemic that's overtaking small-town America, birthed by the medical industries' over-reliance on powerful pain killers. Heroin has become the fallback for those whose prescriptions\u00a0run out. By linking the opiate epidemic to state-run pot programs, Sessions is giving voice to an outdated, flatly false narrative that's militarized police and ruined millions of lives.

But, perhaps, it's even more shocking that Sessions' apparent desire for crackdown would do real harm to so many Iowans and Illinoisans. From veterans suffering with post-traumatic stress to those battling cancer, the clinical application of marijuana is all but established fact.

It's these people whom Sessions hopes to rob of valuable treatment. And, ironically, his backward policy would leave many with few options but the very prescription drugs that actually are damaging communities.\u00a0

The U.S. attorney general has been all over the map on state's rights and the 10th Amendment. One day, he's shouting from the rooftops about the importance of local control. The next, he's seeking a federal crackdown.

It all boils down to whether he personally\u00a0supports the state-level policy. Such inconsistency smacks of a lack of principle.

It would be an understatement to call Illinois' medical marijuana\u00a0program cautious. The state's multi-year pilot program was rolled out slowly. Only now is it getting legitimately established. Iowa's program is downright prudish, considering the growing scientific consensus\u00a0on pot's medical value. Just this year, did lawmakers finally OK a licensing program for growers, and this program is only for the oil extracted from the plant.

To hear Sessions tell it, both states are slinging joints to toddlers.\u00a0

Some states are certainly testing the feds. Colorado and Washington state have both adopted full-fledged legalization, an effort designed to address draconian\u00a0laws that sent a disproportionate number of young, black men to prison. Many others have followed suit. More than half the states in the country now tout a medical or recreational program.

In short, the Nixonian drug war is heading toward its rightful home, the trash heap of misguided policy.\u00a0

Marijuana's place in society has changed drastically in the past decade. So, too, has the public's opinion on it, polls show.\u00a0

Thousands of Iowans and Illinoisans benefit from the state-run programs. And thousands more stand to as research continues to legitimate its place as a viable treatment for those in pain.

But Jeff Sessions doesn't seem to care about the collateral damage. He's too busy fighting a war that never should have existed.\u00a0

"}, {"id":"23545975-1288-5b96-acaf-0ab0667bdea7","type":"article","starttime":"1498248000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-23T15:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1498279448","sections":[{"government-and-politics":"news/local/government-and-politics"}],"flags":{"alert":"true","featured":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Crackdown continues on illegal signs in Davenport","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/government-and-politics/article_23545975-1288-5b96-acaf-0ab0667bdea7.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/government-and-politics/crackdown-continues-on-illegal-signs-in-davenport/article_23545975-1288-5b96-acaf-0ab0667bdea7.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/government-and-politics/crackdown-continues-on-illegal-signs-in-davenport/article_23545975-1288-5b96-acaf-0ab0667bdea7.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Devan Patel\ndpatel@qctimes.com","prologue":"The spring and summer months bring the bloom of flowers, but in the city of Davenport, it also marks the season of illegal signs sprouting up on city right of ways, utility poles and traffic signals. The irony is that some of the items or services advertised about junk, such buying as ugly houses or broken down cars, are the type of\u00a0image the city is trying to remove from its streets.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["mike matson","public works director","nicole gleason","davenport","richard oswald","neighborhood services director","illegal signs","motor vehicle","highway","law","garage sale","inspector","nuisance","coming back"],"internalKeywords":["#free"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"52f937a2-36bb-59e1-845e-a90492fe6ecc","description":"Advertising signs line the road along 53rd Street near Elmore Avenue in Davenport.","byline":"Jeff Cook, QUAD-CITY TIMES","hireswidth":1728,"hiresheight":1198,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52f937a2-36bb-59e1-845e-a90492fe6ecc/594d74ade1937.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1728","height":"1198","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52f937a2-36bb-59e1-845e-a90492fe6ecc/594d74ade0ad2.image.jpg?resize=1728%2C1198"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"69","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52f937a2-36bb-59e1-845e-a90492fe6ecc/594d74ade0ad2.image.jpg?resize=100%2C69"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"208","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52f937a2-36bb-59e1-845e-a90492fe6ecc/594d74ade0ad2.image.jpg?resize=300%2C208"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"710","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52f937a2-36bb-59e1-845e-a90492fe6ecc/594d74ade0ad2.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C710"}}}],"revision":10,"commentID":"23545975-1288-5b96-acaf-0ab0667bdea7","body":"

The spring and summer months bring the bloom of flowers, but in the city of Davenport, it also marks the season of illegal signs sprouting up on city right of ways, utility poles and traffic signals.

The irony is that some of the items or services advertised about junk, such buying as ugly houses or broken down cars, are the type of\u00a0image the city is trying to remove from its streets.

Alderman Mike Matson, 7th Ward, said the problem has been apparent for years with\u00a0Public Works employees sometimes coming back with pickups full of signs, some of which he referred to as \"trashy.\"

\"We've been talking about it for years,\" Matson said. \"We try and get a hold of them and let them they know can't do that. Some are very much repeat customers, and some intersections are very much inundated with them.\"

Public Works Director Nicole Gleason said the signs have become a problem for two main reasons: aesthetics and public safety.

\"It looks bad and makes our city not look as neat and tidy,\" Gleason said.

Gleason said city's code heavily regulates about 40 different types of signs, but in city right of ways, anything that pops up is most likely illegal because there are only a few exceptions to the rule.

\"People are not supposed to put signs in that area unless they have requested a temporary sign permit from city,\" Gleason said. \"We don't get many requests for those, so you can pretty much expect anything in that area to be against code.\"

Within city code, there are rules on all different kinds of signs, from placement, regulating the number and dimensions to restricting moving, flashing or dynamic signs because those can distract drivers.

If there is any question about legality, Gleason said it's best practice to contact the city's Community Planning and Economic Development office to ask.

Neighborhood Services Director Richard Oswald said garage sales qualify as one exception because history shows the property owners are likely to remove the signs.

Real estate and constructions signs also are permitted as long as they are on the property associated with it.

For everything else, the nuisance inspectors assigned to each ward try to remove them as soon as they pop up because if they don't, they're likely to become sun-faded before breaking down and becoming litter.

\"If you look at any major intersection, you'll see numerous signs, and we try to get them pulled as quick as possible,\" Oswald said.

He said the major thoroughfares and intersections, such as Kimberly Road and Brady Street, Kimberly and Elmore Avenue and Five Points, are those most likely to be targeted.

Although the city picks up an average of 20 to 30 signs per week throughout the year, the spring and summer months are much worse and can be as high as a 100 per week.

Oswald said the city tries to educate those who put up signs and usually is successful because many don't realize it's illegal to do so.

But there still sign scofflaws the city has to contend with.

\"The hardest part is getting a hold of the person putting the signs up,\" Oswald said. \"They have a process of screening calls, and if they figure out it's us, they won't return the call.\"

Gleason and Oswald said many of the signs get put up in the late-evening or early-morning hours, which also complicates the process of removing them because it becomes dangerous to remove them during busy hours.

The presence of signs also can become a hazard because they can restrict the view of traffic-related signs.

Although the city has been battling a problem for years, it has managed to turn the illegal signs into something good.

Oswald said the city has recycled and repurposed old nuisance card stock for temporary signs such as those found in the parking garage.

\"If we can recycle some of the material, we try to find other ways to utilize them,\" Oswald said. \"There's a lot of material.\"

Although it may seem like a lot of rules, Oswald said it's a problem that can get out of hand quickly.

\"If we didn't regulate it, imagine how cluttered it would be and them climbing up poles,\" Oswald said.

"}, {"id":"a9064b72-6fe8-5b7c-959b-bc36ced43243","type":"article","starttime":"1498107600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-22T00:00:00-05:00","sections":[{"obituaries":"news/local/obituaries"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Denise L. Knapp","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/obituaries/article_a9064b72-6fe8-5b7c-959b-bc36ced43243.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/obituaries/denise-l-knapp/article_a9064b72-6fe8-5b7c-959b-bc36ced43243.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/obituaries/denise-l-knapp/article_a9064b72-6fe8-5b7c-959b-bc36ced43243.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"\u00a0June 20, 2017 CAMANCHE,\u00a0Iowa\u00a0\u2014 Denise L. Knapp, 41, a resident of Camanche, Iowa, died on Tuesday, June 20, 2017, at Mercy Medical Center in Clinton following an extended illness. A service to celebrate her life will be 5 p.m. Saturday, June 24, 2017, at the McGinnis-Chambers Funeral Home in Bettendorf. Visitation will be 3-5 p.m. Saturday at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to her son, Dillon Knapp.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["obituary: denise l. knapp","civil law","denise l. knapp","camanche","iowa","steve haessler","des moines","dillon knapp","condolence"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"72bd65f1-0aae-5f18-b38a-18ecdc2fceea","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"320","height":"404","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2b/72bd65f1-0aae-5f18-b38a-18ecdc2fceea/594b02e4b373c.image.jpg?resize=320%2C404"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"126","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2b/72bd65f1-0aae-5f18-b38a-18ecdc2fceea/594b02e4b373c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C126"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"379","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2b/72bd65f1-0aae-5f18-b38a-18ecdc2fceea/594b02e4b373c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C379"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1293","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2b/72bd65f1-0aae-5f18-b38a-18ecdc2fceea/594b02e4b373c.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"a9064b72-6fe8-5b7c-959b-bc36ced43243","body":"

\u00a0June 20, 2017

CAMANCHE,\u00a0Iowa\u00a0\u2014 Denise L. Knapp, 41, a resident of Camanche, Iowa, died on Tuesday, June 20, 2017, at Mercy Medical Center in Clinton following an extended illness. A service to celebrate her life will be 5 p.m. Saturday, June 24, 2017, at the McGinnis-Chambers Funeral Home in Bettendorf. Visitation will be 3-5 p.m. Saturday at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to her son, Dillon Knapp.

She was born in Des Moines, Iowa, on July 14, 1975.

Denise was a people person who loved her family, her many friends, enjoyed all types outdoor activities and her beloved canine companions.

Those left to honor her memory include her son, Dillon (Tina) Knapp of Camanche; her step-children, Alexandra Haessler of LeClaire and Duane Haessler of LeClaire; her mother and step-father, Lois and Eddie Brewster of Walcott, Iowa; her sisters, Michelle (Justin) Gilbert of Des Moines, Iowa, and Patricia Shea of Des Moines; her brother, Walter (Sarah) Hamann of Platteville, Wisconsin; and her fianc\u00e9, Steve Haessler of Camanche.

She was preceded in death by her father, Bill Shea.

Condolences may be expressed to the family by viewing her obituary at www.McGinnis-Chambers.com

"}, {"id":"4adbc75b-ac56-559b-8ab9-af45561e4377","type":"article","starttime":"1498165200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-06-22T16:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1498494965","sections":[{"jon-alexander":"news/opinion/editorial/columnists/jon-alexander"}],"flags":{"featured":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Alexander: They think you're stupid, Trump voters","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/jon-alexander/article_4adbc75b-ac56-559b-8ab9-af45561e4377.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/jon-alexander/alexander-they-think-you-re-stupid-trump-voters/article_4adbc75b-ac56-559b-8ab9-af45561e4377.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/jon-alexander/alexander-they-think-you-re-stupid-trump-voters/article_4adbc75b-ac56-559b-8ab9-af45561e4377.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Jon Alexander\nEditorial Page Editor","prologue":"Iowa GOP Chairman Jeff Kaufmann thinks you're stupid.\u00a0 Wednesday night, acting as President Donald Trump's opening act in Cedar Rapids, a red-faced Kaufmann ran through his standard list of grievances. The liberal media this. The never Trumpers that. And then, with the force of a religious zealot, he lit into U.S. Sen. Ben Sasse, a Nebraska Republican who dares scrutinize the Trump administration.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["jeff kaufmann","politics","institutes","ben sasse","senate judiciary committee","chuck grassley","donald trump","republicans","allegation"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"280a0741-dd5c-5eaf-acfd-6df11c200665","description":"Jeff Kaufmann, chairman of the Republican Party of Iowa, gives opening remarks before President Donald Trump is introduced at the U.S. Cellular Center in Cedar Rapids on Wednesday, June 21, 2017.","byline":"Andy Abeyta, QUAD-CITY TIMES","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":1999,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/80/280a0741-dd5c-5eaf-acfd-6df11c200665/594b293d161f3.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1764","height":"1175","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/80/280a0741-dd5c-5eaf-acfd-6df11c200665/594b293cbab98.image.jpg?resize=1764%2C1175"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/80/280a0741-dd5c-5eaf-acfd-6df11c200665/594b293cbab98.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/80/280a0741-dd5c-5eaf-acfd-6df11c200665/594b293cbab98.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/80/280a0741-dd5c-5eaf-acfd-6df11c200665/594b293cbab98.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"82bec63e-cf72-5b85-a998-5b198a6cb8f3","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"720","height":"1019","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/2b/82bec63e-cf72-5b85-a998-5b198a6cb8f3/573103b5b7ccb.image.jpg?resize=720%2C1019"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"141","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/2b/82bec63e-cf72-5b85-a998-5b198a6cb8f3/567963934788e.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"198","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/2b/82bec63e-cf72-5b85-a998-5b198a6cb8f3/573103b5b7ccb.image.jpg?crop=712%2C470%2C1%2C282&resize=300%2C198&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"676","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/2b/82bec63e-cf72-5b85-a998-5b198a6cb8f3/573103b5b7ccb.image.jpg?crop=712%2C470%2C1%2C282"}}}],"revision":13,"commentID":"4adbc75b-ac56-559b-8ab9-af45561e4377","body":"

Iowa GOP Chairman Jeff Kaufmann thinks you're stupid.\u00a0

Wednesday night, acting as President Donald Trump's opening act in Cedar Rapids, a red-faced Kaufmann ran through his standard list of grievances. The liberal media this. The never Trumpers that.

And then, with the force of a religious zealot, he lit into U.S. Sen. Ben Sasse, a Nebraska Republican who dares scrutinize the Trump administration.

\u201cYou know what, Sen. Sasse? I really don\u2019t care what you like. We love Donald Trump. And if you don\u2019t love him, I suggest you stay on your side of the Missouri River,\u201d Kaufmann declared, essentially demanding that Sasse stay out of Iowa.

Sasse is scheduled to be the Keynote speaker July 7 at Story County GOP's annual dinner.

Later, as if completely blind to his own academic credentials, Kaufmann blasted Sasse, a former college president, for being one of those damned pin heads.

\u201cHe\u2019s an arrogant academic. He\u2019s sanctimonious. His statements are geared toward what can help\u00a0him. He\u2019s arrogant,\" Kaufmann said.

Context: Kaufmann has a Ph.D. and is chairman of Muscatine County Community College's History Department.

Kaufmann is putting on an act, pretending to be something he's not. And his ruse is an unmitigated slight to its intended audience. It's a rant based in classist resentment and a disdain for \"intellectuals.\" It assumes that those in the audience are hostile to ideas, education and independent\u00a0thought.

In short, Kaufmann is indicting the throngs of onlookers of stupidity.\u00a0

Kaufmann's fraudulent shtick should sound familiar. His rant was a near carbon copy of one from a few months back, when he blasted the Quad-City Times editorial board. His diatribe about The Gazette, of Cedar Rapids, which published a front page editorial the day of Trump's visit, was basically a repeat of his tirade aimed at this editorial board. He even pulled out the tiresome \"bush league\" line, which he cribbed from one of our editorials published last year.\u00a0

Everyone's an outsider, except those who fawn over Trump, according to Kaufmann. Everyone who dares question Trump is nothing but a partisan hack. These are troubling statements from a man whose primary job is arming liberal arts students with critical minds.

Kaufmann is exploiting an old religious ploy. Only total and abject faith is accepted. Anyone who commits the sin of questioning -- even Sasse -- is an outsider who merits only disdain. Kaufmann, a historian by training, is obviously aware of just how dangerous such thinking is. The entire concept of the modern Republic sprung from centuries of oppression forged by the Vatican and its sycophantic\u00a0monarchs.

Critical, informed dissent is, in every regard, the very foundation of this form of government. Kaufmann is treating Iowa's GOP like a medieval cathedral. And his goals are the same: To lord over the minds of anyone who will listen.\u00a0

Unfortunately for Kaufmann, his rhetoric has backed him into a corner. During his tirade in Davenport earlier this year, Kaufmann said Republicans should run him out if his support for Trump \"ever waivers.\" Strong, but dangerous sophistry from a man who knows the importance of rhetorical elbow room. Blind faith is all one has when tying your career to a man unable to operate within the realms of basic fact or political reality.

You won't hear such universal proclamations of support from the likes of Sens. Chuck Grassley or Joni Ernst. Hell, Grassley's Senate Judiciary Committee is now probing allegations of obstruction of justice against the president. Somehow, I doubt Kaufmann has the guts to level such an attack on the likes of Grassley, though. He only picks easy targets. So much for conviction. \u00a0

So, from here on out, anyone attending an event where Jeff Kaufmann is slated to speak should know what to expect. His face will turn many shades of purple. Spittle will fly from his mouth and his voice will crack. He'll tell you that there are two types of people: Those who blindly follow and those who think for themselves.

His is an old trick. The real question is, are you willing to buy it?

"} ]