[ {"id":"8e5a606b-69a4-57cb-862f-60e6cb822797","type":"article","starttime":"1484599131","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T14:38:51-06:00","lastupdated":"1484601420","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Bank of England Governor: Bank will protect economic growth","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/world/article_8e5a606b-69a4-57cb-862f-60e6cb822797.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/world/bank-of-england-governor-bank-will-protect-economic-growth/article_8e5a606b-69a4-57cb-862f-60e6cb822797.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/bank-of-england-governor-bank-will-protect-economic-growth/article_80140c5a-cffa-58f6-a50f-014815703859.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By DANICA KIRKA\nAssociated Press","prologue":"LONDON (AP) \u2014 The Bank of England remains ready to protect economic growth in the face of pressures caused by Britain's departure from the European Union, the central bank's top executive said Monday as investors waited for the country's prime minister to lay out her vision for Brexit.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","general news","economic growth","brexit referendum","economy","government and politics","business","events","prices","banking and credit","financial services","currency markets","economic policy","government business and finance","government policy","financial markets"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"8e5a606b-69a4-57cb-862f-60e6cb822797","body":"

LONDON (AP) \u2014 The Bank of England remains ready to protect economic growth in the face of pressures caused by Britain's departure from the European Union, the central bank's top executive said Monday as investors waited for the country's prime minister to lay out her vision for Brexit.

The bank's Monetary Policy Committee has the discretion to balance its legally mandated goal of controlling inflation against the need for economic stability, Governor Mark Carney said in a speech at the London School of Economics.

\"In exceptional circumstances, trade-offs between real stability and inflation can arise that monetary policy is required to balance,\" Carney said. \"This is now the case, given the decision of the people of the United Kingdom to leave the EU.\"

His remarks, delivered as British Prime Minister Theresa May prepares to deliver her own speech Tuesday setting out her Brexit blueprint, suggest the bank is ready to act to stave off economic uncertainty.

Under pressure to reveal her plans for negotiating with the EU, May is expected to call for a \"truly global Britain\" that is more open to the world.

But reports in major newspapers over the weekend indicated that May plans a clean break with the 28-nation bloc, which sent the pound tumbling Monday on concern about how the withdrawal would affect trade, investment and economic growth.

The pound has lost almost a fifth of its value against the dollar since British voters in July approved a referendum to leave the EU.

Despite concerns about inflation, the Bank of England in August reduced its benchmark interest rate by 0.25 percent and increased asset purchases to ease concerns about the vote.

The bank's actions helped prevent a slowdown in the economy that would have cost about 250,000 jobs, Carney said Monday.

\"There remains an element of discretion in how the (Monetary Policy Committee) delivers its inflation objective,\" he said. \"That is because the people of the U.K. also have reason to value stable growth, jobs and incomes.\"

With the government preparing to open formal exit talks with the EU by the end of March, the bank is prepared to respond.

\"Whatever transpires, the MPC will manage monetary policy to achieve the inflation target in a sustainable manner consistent with the preferences and instructions of the people of the United Kingdom,\" Carney said.

"}, {"id":"1f266816-0005-5704-af87-d0fc084a18d0","type":"article","starttime":"1484598180","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T14:23:00-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"markets-and-stocks":"business/investment/markets-and-stocks"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Why Overstock.com, Inc. Stock Skyrocketed 41.7% in 2016","url":"http://qctimes.com/business/investment/markets-and-stocks/article_1f266816-0005-5704-af87-d0fc084a18d0.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/business/investment/markets-and-stocks/why-overstock-com-inc-stock-skyrocketed-in/article_1f266816-0005-5704-af87-d0fc084a18d0.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/business/investment/markets-and-stocks/why-overstock-com-inc-stock-skyrocketed-in/article_2f0258ec-b6fa-5e6b-9fac-48364cca1d9e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"newsfeedback@fool.com (Steve Symington)","prologue":"IMAGE SOURCE: OVERSTOCK.COM","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"52ff8d3e-59a6-50a7-a4d2-d3b6d557634b","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"580","height":"242","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52ff8d3e-59a6-50a7-a4d2-d3b6d557634b/587d384df2414.image.png?resize=580%2C242"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"42","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52ff8d3e-59a6-50a7-a4d2-d3b6d557634b/587d384df2414.image.png?resize=100%2C42"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"125","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52ff8d3e-59a6-50a7-a4d2-d3b6d557634b/587d384df2414.image.png?resize=300%2C125"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"427","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52ff8d3e-59a6-50a7-a4d2-d3b6d557634b/587d384df2414.image.png"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"1f266816-0005-5704-af87-d0fc084a18d0","body":"

IMAGE SOURCE: OVERSTOCK.COM

What happened

Shares of\u00a0Overstock.com Inc.\u00a0(NASDAQ: OSTK)\u00a0climbed 41.7%\u00a0in 2016,\u00a0according to data provided by\u00a0S&P Global Market Intelligence, as the internet retailer impressed the market with upbeat quarterly results and progress in both its retail and blockchain businesses.

So what

Overstock's first big jump came in February, when shares soared 23% after an encouraging fourth-quarter 2015 report but not so much because of its actual headline numbers. For perspective, Q4 2015 revenue climbed just 2% year over year, to $480 million, while net income was $110,000, or breakeven on a per-share basis and down from $0.06 per share in the same year-ago period. Management noted at the time, however, that profitability was held back by Overstock's investments in blockchain, the same capital markets technology used by bitcoin, as well as by a 4% contribution profit decline from its stumbling retail segment.

\"I am exploring a possible synergy between these two wings of our business (retail and our capital markets innovation),\" added Overstock CEO Patrick Byrne at the time, \"but if it does prove out they will be separated.\"

Most recently, Overstock's third-quarter 2016 report in November caused shares to climb another 19% in a single day as the company's core retail business began to show signs of progress. Quarterly revenue climbed 13% year over year, to $441.6 million, while Overstock's net loss widened by roughly half from the same year-ago period, to $3.1 million, or $0.08 per share.

Nonetheless, Byrne insisted:

The retail business is reaccelerating and is fundamentally sound.\u00a0It had a pre-tax loss of\u00a0($0.9) million\u00a0in Q3, which included\u00a0$3.9 million\u00a0of impairment and bad debt expense related to an international minority investment. Our Medici business cost us\u00a0$3.0 million\u00a0pre-tax this quarter, but that was well worth it as we achieve real progress in our blockchain and fintech initiatives that others have yet to demonstrate.

Now what

Let it suffice to say, then, that investors will be on the edge of their seats looking for continued retail progress when Overstock releases its fourth-quarter 2016 results early next month. But for now, given the promise of Overstock's blockchain investments and the ongoing rebound of its retail segment, it's no surprise shares have climbed so much over the past year.

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MINNEAPOLIS (AP) \u2014 The U.S. Department of Justice has sued a Minnesota bank for allegedly engaging in mortgage lending practices that discriminate against minorities. The bank disputed the claim Monday, saying the lawsuit is not based on fact.

In a lawsuit filed Friday, the department said KleinBank engaged in \"redlining,\" a practice in which banks deny or avoid providing credit services to consumers because of racial demographics or because of the neighborhood where they live.

Doug Hile, the bank's president and chief executive, said the government's claim \"has absolutely no basis in fact. To the contrary, KleinBank has an established history of responding to all credit requests with a commitment to fairness and equal opportunity. This history is undisputed.\"

In the lawsuit, the federal government alleges KleinBank violated the Fair Housing Act and Equal Credit Opportunity Act. It says that from 2010 to at least 2015, KleinBank structured its home mortgage lending business to avoid serving neighborhoods where a majority of residents are racial and ethnic minorities.

The lawsuit says the bank's service area is in a horseshoe shape that carves out the urban areas of Minneapolis and St. Paul, which have higher minority populations, and targeted its marketing and advertising solely toward white neighborhoods.

KleinBank is based in Chaska, a southwestern Minneapolis suburb, and its website says it has 21 branches in suburbs west of Minneapolis and St. Paul and in western Minnesota. Census data shows those areas are predominantly white.

\"Minneapolis and St. Paul are not part of KleinBank's market, and we have virtually no business there,\" Hile said. He said the Twin Cities are highly competitive markets that are already served by well-established financial institutions, and the government's claim that KleinBank had a proactive duty to expand into those areas amounts to \"a baseless and unprecedented reach by the government.\"

The lawsuit claims that from 2010 to 2015 comparable lenders generated loan applications in minority neighborhoods at over five times the rate of KleinBank. The other lenders made loans in those neighborhoods at over four times KleinBank's rate.

Vanita Gupta, principal deputy assistant attorney general and head of the federal agency's Civil Rights Division, said in a statement that redlining produces an unequal playing field for borrowers in neighborhoods where minorities are the majority.

Hile said KleinBank has been cooperating with a DOJ inquiry about its lending practices for over a year.

KleinBank was founded 110 years ago.

___

Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/amyforliti . More of her work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/amy-forliti

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BRUSSELS (AP) \u2014 European Union nations bracing for the looming Donald Trump presidency showed defiance Monday in the face of the president-elect's stinging comments on everything from NATO and German cars to the crumbling of the EU itself.

German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier said the U.S. president-elect's view that NATO was obsolete and his criticism that European allied members aren't paying their fair share had \"caused astonishment.\"

Trump also said Britain's decision to leave the 28-nation European Union would \"end up being a great thing,\" and he predicted that other countries would also leave.

At a meeting of EU ministers, French Foreign Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault said the best response to such comments was simple \u2014 \"it is the unity of the Europeans.\"

In Berlin, German Chancellor Angela Merkel insisted: \"We Europeans have our fate in our own hands.\"

\"I'm personally going to wait until the American president takes office, and then we will naturally work with him on all levels,\" she told reporters.

French President Francois Hollande was even more outspoken in his defiance.

Europe \"has no need for outside advice to tell it what to do,\" Hollande said at a ceremony for outgoing U.S. ambassador in Paris Jane Hartley.

\"Europe will always be willing to pursue trans-Atlantic cooperation, but it will base its decisions on its interests and its values,\" he added.

Some EU officials fear Trump's frequent, often acerbic Twitter postings might be the prelude to a caustic presidency after Friday's inauguration.

\"We are going to move away from, I guess, a kind of Twitter diplomacy, and then into a reality,\" said Danish Foreign Minister Anders Samuelsen, adding that reality could be \"perhaps more difficult than what is going on on Twitter.\"

EU foreign ministers were already worried what Trump might do beyond their continent. They came out against any plan by Trump to move the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem and warned that it could ratchet up tensions with the Arab world.

\"It is very important for us all to refrain from unilateral actions,\" EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini said. \"We hope that there can be reflection on consequences of any move that is taken,\" she said.

Although Trump had made similar statements about NATO during his election campaign, his recent comments still came as a bit of a surprise since his choice for defense secretary, retired Marine Gen. James Mattis, stressed his support for the NATO military alliance in his U.S. congressional confirmation hearing last week.

Trump's views, in an interview published Monday with German daily Bild and The Times of London, contradict Mattis, Steinmeier said.

\"If one compares the positions of the designated president and the future foreign and defense ministers, then one can't discern a common foreign policy line among the new U.S. government,\" he said.

There have even been fears the U.S. military commitment to Europe would wane under Trump. A German newspaper group reports that Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaite has urged Trump to continue meeting the U.S.'s financial obligations toward the alliance.

\"Since World War II, the presence of U.S. troops has been a prerequisite for rebuilding the continent, safeguarding peace and ensuring security,\" she told the RND network of some 30 German papers.

\"We expect continuity from the new U.S. administration. Trump must maintain this leadership role, to ensure security, stability and peace,\" she was quoted as saying.

Trump indicated he was indifferent to whether the EU stays together or not, a sharp break from the Obama administration, which encouraged British people to vote to remain in the EU in the June referendum.

\"I believe others will leave ... I do think keeping it together is not gonna be as easy as a lot of people think,\" Trump said in the interview.

The British exit from the EU would \"end up being a great thing,\" he said.

British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said it's \"very good news that the United States of America wants to do a good free trade deal with us and wants to do it very fast.\"

Trump was less kind to German industry officials, saying car manufacturers including BMW could face tariffs of up to 35 percent if they set up plants in Mexico instead of in the U.S. and try to export the cars to the U.S.

Such tariffs would make the American auto industry \"worse, weaker and more expensive,\" Sigmar Gabriel, Germany's economy minister, told Bild.

Gabriel suggested Europeans should exhibit more self-confidence in dealing with Trump. \"We're not weak and inferior,\" he said.

Whatever his goal, Trump's comments were strong enough to make him the talk of the town in European capitals.

\"It is clear that we are discussing this issue all the time,\" Czech Foreign Minister Lubomir Zaoralek said at the EU meeting in Brussels.

___

Grieshaber reported from Berlin. David Rising and Frank Jordans in Berlin, Lorne Cook in Brussels and Sylvie Corbet in Paris contributed.

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PHOENIX (AP) \u2014 The state health department is asking the Arizona Legislature to pass a law allowing it to lease parts of the state mental hospital and its 93-acre grounds to private providers.

Department of Health Services Director Cara Christ told the House health committee at a hearing last week that her department wants to build a Center for Psychiatric Excellence on the grounds.

The hospital and grounds about a mile north of Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport is held in a charitable trust for the benefit of mental health patients in the state. The law change would allow Christ to sign short- and long-term leases and development agreements with private providers.

The hospital itself will not be privatized and its staff will remain state employees, said Colby Bower, an assistant director at the department.

The hospital currently has 311 patients divided between three units \u2014 one for sex offenders, one for patients who have been convicted of serious crimes and determined to be insane, and one for people ordered by the courts to be hospitalized because of mental illness.

The idea is to have private mental health providers develop facilities that would create a behavioral health campus. They could include outpatient behavioral health services, urgent psychiatric services, 24-hour holds for observation and stabilization, short stays for adult inpatient acute psychiatric services and a psychiatric emergency room.

Private providers could use empty hospital wards, renovate and use vacant buildings or build new facilities.

\"We are looking to build a campus of psychiatric excellence to help build the workforce to increase the behavioral health services that are provided in the community and to be able to provide our patients with the entire continuum of psychiatric care,\" Christ told the committee.

Christ needs legislative approval to enter into the leases, and has the approval of the chairwoman of the House health committee. Rep. Heather Carter, R-Cave Creek. She called it a good way to combine providers on one campus and leverage state assets.

\"I think the idea is really forward-thinking,\" Carter said in an interview Friday. \"And I applaud our agencies for thinking entrepreneurial about how to make highest and best use of the land. That's prime real estate and it has a clearly articulated purpose to serve our Arizona citizens.\"

The committee advanced House Bill 2043 on an 8-0 vote with one abstention on Thursday. It now heads to floor debate after a routine constitutional review.

The hospital has plenty of unused space. It currently has about 80 unoccupied beds in four wards in the secured civil hospital that could be leased out; a building with a 28-bed capacity now used as administrative space that could become an urgent care center; and 23 available beds in a building adjacent to the criminal commitment unit.

The hospital also has a vacant building that could house offices or patient beds, an abandoned complex of 10 single-story buildings that could be razed or renovated and an empty 2-acre plot that could be a building site.

About a dozen private providers from large hospitals to small groups expressed interest after the health department asked for feedback, Bower said.

\"We feel like there's enough interest out there to move forward,\" he said.

"}, {"id":"ee208836-1757-5258-8b0d-7a2a6be2499d","type":"article","starttime":"1484594703","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-16T13:25:03-06:00","lastupdated":"1484597719","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"business":"business"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Italy says tests show Fiat 500X cars meet emissions rules","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/world/article_ee208836-1757-5258-8b0d-7a2a6be2499d.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/world/italy-says-tests-show-fiat-x-cars-meet-emissions-rules/article_ee208836-1757-5258-8b0d-7a2a6be2499d.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/italy-says-tests-show-fiat-x-cars-meet-emissions-rules/article_2d07b66b-2785-5108-bc54-504705863caa.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"ROME (AP) \u2014 The Italian transportation ministry says its tests show that Fiat 500X cars meet emissions rules, despite German contentions that the cars contain so-called defeat devices meant to cheat emissions tests.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","business","general news","environmental laws and regulations","automobile shows","products and services","corporate news","environment","environment and nature","government regulations","government and politics","environmental concerns","air quality","automobiles","lifestyle"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"ee208836-1757-5258-8b0d-7a2a6be2499d","body":"

ROME (AP) \u2014 The Italian transportation ministry says its tests show that Fiat 500X cars meet emissions rules, despite German contentions that the cars contain so-called defeat devices meant to cheat emissions tests.

A ministry statement Monday says it carried out the necessary checks and sent a detailed report to Germany indicating the model \"meets the existing regulations\" on emissions testing.

The ministry says no illegal defeat device system turned up in the testing.

Germany's transport minister has insisted that according to German experts Fiat used the devices.

Italian Transport Minister Graziano Delrio says \"we have nothing to hide\" and \"you don't give orders to a sovereign country like Italy.\"

Italy says its test results were given to Germany and to the European Commission in November, and it is awaiting a follow-up.

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DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) \u2014 The Latest on the World Economic Forum's annual meeting in the Swiss ski resort of Davos (all times local):

7:45 p.m.

There's no chance that Klaus Schwab, the founder of the elite political and business gathering in Davos, will undersell the importance of the World Economic Forum.

Addressing delegates Monday in the Swiss ski resort, Schwab said this year's 47th WEF is taking place at an \"extraordinary moment of history,\" when a \"sometimes-disruptive transformation\" partly related to technological advances is hitting businesses and societies.

Acknowledging a growing pessimism around the world, Schwab urged delegates to look to the future in a \"self-confident way,\" to repair deficiencies in the capitalist system and to think in the long term.

Schwab also noted that one-third of those at this year's meeting are from the emerging world, including the largest-ever delegations from China and India.

The forum officially starts Tuesday. Chinese President Xi Jinping arrived Monday by train to a red carpet welcome.

___

7:15 p.m.

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden says his \"prayer\" is that the incoming Trump administration will continue to support the fight against cancer, which kept Biden from running for president after it took the life of his son, Beau.

Biden was speaking Monday before the start of the World Economic Forum in Davos to promote his \"Cancer Moonshot\" initiative. He hailed bipartisan support in Congress for a bill that brought in $1.8 billion for additional research at the National Cancer Institute.

Biden said he had spoken with Vice President-elect Mike Pence about his willingness to work with the new Trump administration to help it be as \"committed and enthusiastic as we are in the goal of ending cancer.\"

He urged other countries to also invest in the fight against cancer and called for greater collaboration among researchers, health care providers and drug firms.

___

6:30 p.m.

CEOs are increasingly confident about the near-term prospects of their companies despite an array of worries that includes mounting concerns over a lurch toward trade protectionism.

That's the finding from an annual survey of CEOs by global accounting and consulting firm PwC ahead of the World Economic Forum.

The survey found that 38 percent of CEOs are very confident about their company's growth prospects in the next 12 months, against 35 percent last year. Meanwhile, 29 percent of respondents believe global economic growth will pick up in 2017, up from 27 percent last year.

Bob Moritz, PwC's chairman, says one worry that has swelled over the past few months is protectionism. Fears that the era of globalization may go into reverse have been stoked by Britain's vote to leave the European Union and Donald Trump's election as U.S. president.

PwC's survey was based on 1,379 interviews across 79 countries between Sept. 26 and Dec. 5, with the majority conducted online.

___

5:45 p.m.

The chairman of global accounting and consulting firm PwC doubts that many companies will leave Britain after the country exits the European Union.

Speaking to The Associated Press in the Swiss ski resort of Davos ahead of Tuesday's official start to the World Economic Forum, Bob Moritz said he hadn't seen any institutions leave and that he doesn't expect them to do so \"anytime soon.\"

However, Moritz says his firm is advising its many clients to be \"thoughtful\" and to engage in \"scenario planning.\"

British Prime Minister Theresa May is due to outline her vision of Britain's post-EU future on Tuesday.

The British pound fell around 1 percent Monday on worries that May will make it clear that her government is prepared to leave the EU's single market, which guarantees no tariffs on goods and services, during the upcoming Brexit discussions. That's prompted speculation that firms will ditch Britain in favor of a base within the single market.

___

5:15 p.m.

For 51 weeks of the year, the Swiss village of Davos is much like other Alpine ski resorts \u2014 fairly low profile. But around the annual World Economic Forum, it turns into something more akin to a fortress.

Checkpoints, roadblocks, airspace restrictions and armed forces are put in place to provide security to the visiting business and political leaders.

Swiss authorities say the extra security cost for this year's gathering, which officially begins Tuesday, is around 9 million Swiss francs ($9 million) as of late November. That's split between various parties, including the central government and the WEF itself.

The cost of deploying troops at this event is said to be similar to that of a regular training for battalions. In previous years, it has cost an average of 28 million Swiss francs per meeting.

The Federal Council, Switzerland's executive branch, considers the WEF \"an exceptional event,\" providing \"a unique opportunity\" to bolster relations with leading figures.

___

1:30 p.m.

The World Economic Forum, which organizes the annual gathering of the global political and business elites in the Swiss ski resort of Davos, says the focus on economic growth, which has guided policymaking for decades, is no longer fit for purpose.

In a report published Monday, the WEF proposed a shift in policymaking to \"respond more effectively to the insecurity and inequality accompanying technological change and globalization.\"

The WEF's main recommendation is that governments make improving living standards one of their key goals.

It says most countries are \"missing important opportunities to raise economic growth and reduce inequality at the same time,\" adding that measurements such as life expectancy, productivity and poverty rates should be priorities.

Under a new ranking system that incorporates so-called \"inclusive development,\" the WEF rated Norway top, followed by Luxembourg and Switzerland.

The issue of inequalities both within countries and across the world is a key focus of this year's WEF, which officially opens Tuesday.

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DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) \u2014 She may not be working in the White House, but that doesn't mean Ivanka Trump is staying out of politics.

Although she has said she will have no official role in her father's administration, Ivanka Trump has been quietly laying the groundwork for an effort that could make her perhaps the best-connected policy advocate in Washington. Trump, who has made clear she wants to push for policies benefiting women and girls, last week sought the advice of a group of female executives and media stars in New York City. And transition aides have reached out to congressional staff on child care policies, an area she has urged President-elect Donald Trump to prioritize.

In a Facebook post detailing her next moves, Ivanka Trump thanked people who had reached out on such issues and added that she is determining the \"most impactful and appropriate ways for me to serve our country.\"

It is not clear if Trump will establish herself independently or if she will eventually enter the White House. But operating from the outside may take her into uncharted territory, as there are few recent examples of a first family member without a White House office advocating for policies. The closest model is the first lady, who has an office in the East Wing.

For now, the businesswoman has said only that she is stepping away from executive roles at the Trump Organization and her lifestyle brand and is moving her family to Washington so that her husband, Jared Kushner, can take a job as a senior adviser. She has also stressed that she wants to focus on settling her three young children in a new home.

But Ivanka Trump is also thinking beyond that.

On Thursday, she attended a dinner with female executives at the home of her friend Wendi Deng, ex-wife of media executive Rubert Murdoch. The dinner was put together by Dina Powell, a Goldman Sachs partner who is joining the Trump administration as an assistant to the president and senior counselor for economic initiatives. Powell has been advising Ivanka Trump and is expected to continue working closely with her.

Other guests included MSNBC \"Morning Joe\" co-host Mika Brzezinski, model Christy Turlington Burns, former White House press secretary Dana Perino, Xerox Chairperson Ursula Burns, Deloitte CEO Cathy Engelbert, Glamour Editor-in-Chief Cynthia Leive and Time Managing Editor Nancy Gibbs. Another attendee, Pattie Sellers, executive director of Fortune's Most Powerful Women Summits, wrote on Fortune.com that Ivanka Trump \"explained that she wanted to learn from the efforts of leaders in their fields.\"

Also there was Sheila Marcelo, founder of www.care.com, a website that connects families with caregivers, said an attendee who spoke on condition of anonymity because it was a private dinner. Marcelo spoke about the high cost of caregiving, both for children and adult family members.

The attendee said the group also discussed the Trump transition team's recent outreach to the House of Representatives' Ways and Means Committee staff about Trump's child care proposals. Asked about news reports about the outreach, Ivanka Trump noted that these were priorities for the president-elect, the attendee said.

A Trump Transition spokesperson declined to comment on the event.

Ivanka Trump's interest and influence on these issues was clear during the campaign. Encouraged by his daughter, Donald Trump offered a child care plan in September, which includes guaranteeing six weeks of paid maternity leave for new mothers, as well as some incentives to encourage employers to provide child care to workers.

The policy would require congressional approval \u2014 a considerable hurdle. Such proposals are not a high priority for Republican leadership and it's not clear how well they'll be received by conservatives in the GOP-controlled Congress.

Ivanka Trump has already made some outreach to lawmakers, including meeting with Republican women back in September. But it is not clear if, moving forward, she will lobby Congress directly.

There is little precedent for a president's adult child seeking to have that sort of influence, said University of Minnesota law professor Richard Painter, who served as ethics counsel for President George W. Bush.

The closest comparison would be the policy work by first ladies, like Michelle Obama's \"Let's Move\" campaign. Painter said that first ladies are generally not subject to conflict of interest laws, though in the past they complied voluntarily like past presidents.

But Painter said to avoid conflicts, Ivanka Trump should, like her husband, follow federal ethics laws. For example, he said she should not offer her father advice on international trade if she continues to have a financial stake in her clothing business. He said he did not think Ivanka Trump would need to register as a lobbyist if she was a policy advocate if she was not paid.

Ivanka Trump has said she will take a \"formal leave of absence\" from her executive positions at the Trump Organization and her lifestyle brand \u2014 which offers shoes, clothes and messages of female empowerment. Her company will be run by the current president and a board of trustees.

The Trump team has said Ivanka Trump will divest some assets and will receive fixed payments rather than a share of the profits from the Trump Organization. No details have been released on her financial arrangement with the lifestyle brand.

"} ]