[ {"id":"4e7eef74-8627-5b9a-b405-a5120717b7ce","type":"article","starttime":"1484750742","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T08:45:42-06:00","lastupdated":"1484754440","priority":0,"sections":[{"illinois":"news/state-and-regional/illinois"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Study finds global warming could steal postcard-perfect days","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/state-and-regional/illinois/article_4e7eef74-8627-5b9a-b405-a5120717b7ce.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/state-and-regional/illinois/study-finds-global-warming-could-steal-postcard-perfect-days/article_4e7eef74-8627-5b9a-b405-a5120717b7ce.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/state-and-regional/illinois/study-finds-global-warming-could-steal-postcard-perfect-days/article_4e7eef74-8627-5b9a-b405-a5120717b7ce.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By SETH BORENSTEIN\nAP Science Writer","prologue":"WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Global warming is going to steal away some of those postcard-perfect weather days in the future, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather. On average, Earth will have 10 fewer days of mild and mostly dry weather by the end of the century, the researchers estimate. Some places will get more days perfect for picnics or outdoor weddings, while other places will lose a lot. Rio de Janeiro, Miami and much of Africa are big losers, while Europe and Seattle will gain nicer weather.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","illinois state news","general news","science","atmospheric science","climate","environmental concerns","earth science","environment and nature","environment"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"cd888b76-b241-5a51-9aa2-1759f7bf9722","description":"FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2013 file photo, a child plays with a ball next to a couple posing for a photographer in a park outside Bucharest, Romania. Newlywed couples took advantage of the unusual warm weather for the month of November, with temperatures reaching 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit), for outdoor photo sessions. Kiss goodbye some of those postcard-perfect, ideal-for-outdoor-wedding days. A new study said global warming is going to steal some of those exceedingly pleasant weather days from our future. On average, Earth will have four fewer days of mild and mostly dry weather by 2035 and ten fewer of them by the end of the century, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)","byline":"Vadim Ghirda","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"331","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d8/cd888b76-b241-5a51-9aa2-1759f7bf9722/587efa66ad3ca.image.jpg?resize=512%2C331"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d8/cd888b76-b241-5a51-9aa2-1759f7bf9722/587efa66ad3ca.image.jpg?resize=100%2C65"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"194","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d8/cd888b76-b241-5a51-9aa2-1759f7bf9722/587efa66ad3ca.image.jpg?resize=300%2C194"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"662","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/d8/cd888b76-b241-5a51-9aa2-1759f7bf9722/587efa66ad3ca.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"9371e9bc-4856-5eae-9eee-afaf85c8a0bf","description":"In this image provided by Karin van der Wiel/ NOAA/ Princeton University, shows climate change effects on patterns of mild weather. Kiss goodbye some of those postcard-perfect, ideal-for-outdoor-wedding days. A new study said global warming is going to steal some of those exceedingly pleasant weather days from our future. On average, Earth will have four fewer days of mild and mostly dry weather by 2035 and ten fewer of them by the end of the century, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather. (Karin van der Wiel/ NOAA/ Princeton University via AP)","byline":"Karin van der Wiel","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"280","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/37/9371e9bc-4856-5eae-9eee-afaf85c8a0bf/587efa66d0cb6.image.jpg?resize=512%2C280"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"55","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/37/9371e9bc-4856-5eae-9eee-afaf85c8a0bf/587efa66d0cb6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C55"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"164","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/37/9371e9bc-4856-5eae-9eee-afaf85c8a0bf/587efa66d0cb6.image.jpg?resize=300%2C164"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"560","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/37/9371e9bc-4856-5eae-9eee-afaf85c8a0bf/587efa66d0cb6.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"411c3ced-ac67-571e-ba3a-e27218467fc2","description":"Graphic shows change in mild days in U.S. cities; 2c x 5 inches; 96.3 mm x 127 mm;","byline":"k.vineys","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"362","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/11/411c3ced-ac67-571e-ba3a-e27218467fc2/587f838527367.image.jpg?resize=362%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"141","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/11/411c3ced-ac67-571e-ba3a-e27218467fc2/587f838527367.image.jpg?resize=100%2C141"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"424","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/11/411c3ced-ac67-571e-ba3a-e27218467fc2/587f838527367.image.jpg?resize=300%2C424"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1448","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/11/411c3ced-ac67-571e-ba3a-e27218467fc2/587f838527367.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"4e7eef74-8627-5b9a-b405-a5120717b7ce","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 Global warming is going to steal away some of those postcard-perfect weather days in the future, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather.

On average, Earth will have 10 fewer days of mild and mostly dry weather by the end of the century, the researchers estimate. Some places will get more days perfect for picnics or outdoor weddings, while other places will lose a lot. Rio de Janeiro, Miami and much of Africa are big losers, while Europe and Seattle will gain nicer weather.

\"It's the type of weather where you can go outside and do something fun,\" said study lead author Karin van der Wiel, a meteorology researcher at Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration . \"It's not too cold. It's not too hot. It's not too humid.\"

For the past three decades, the world has averaged 74 mild days a year. But by 2035 that will shrink to 70 and then 64 by the last two decades of the century, according to the study, published Wednesday in the journal Climatic Change . Mild weather was defined as between 68 and 86 degrees (18 and 30 degrees Celsius) with low humidity and no more than a trace of rain.

Any change depends on where you live and the time of year. For example, on average, the U.S. will lose nine mild summer days by the end of the century, although most is gained back with more mild days in the winter, spring and fall. The report estimates that Washington, Chicago, New York and Dallas will lose two weeks of pleasant summer weather but some is gained back. On average, Washington loses 13 mild days; Atlanta, 12; Chicago, 9; Denver and New York, 6; and Dallas, 1.

The biggest losers will be the tropics and nearly all of Africa, eastern South America, South Asia and northern Australia. Rio de Janeiro, on average, will see 40 mild days disappear. Miami will lose its only mild summer day and nearly a month of spring and fall mild days by 2100.

\"The changes are more dramatic in parts of the developing world, where you have high concentrations of populations,\" said NOAA climate scientist and co-author Sarah Kapnick.

Other places, especially northern developed ones, will gain some of what the tropics lost. England and northern Europe are big winners. Seattle should pick up nine mild days and Los Angeles, which already has a lot of nice weather, gets six extra by the end of the century.

The scientists didn't specifically focus on whether the loss of mild days has already started globally, but they did see it happening in much of Africa and South America, Van der Wiel said.

Climate scientists usually focus on extreme weather \u2014 record heat, tropical cyclones, droughts, floods \u2014 and how they could get worse as the world warms. Kapnick said she wanted to look at nice weather because her friends kept asking her what day to choose for good wedding weather.

The team used a middle ground scenario for global warming \u2014 not worst-case runaway carbon pollution and not dramatic cuts in emissions of heat-trapping gases \u2014 and ran different computer simulations to see what would happen.

It's not just fewer nice days to enjoy. Fewer mild days will also harm agricultural production and allow disease carrying insects to thrive more in more places, said University of Georgia meteorology professor Marshall Shepherd.

Stanford University climate scientist Chris Field, who led an international study of extreme weather, questioned the purpose of the study: \"Extreme conditions are the sharp end of the climate stick. It is in the extremes when things break and damage occurs.\"

National Center for Atmospheric Research scientist Gerald Meehl, who also studies extreme weather, said a decrease in mild weather may not quite have the economic and health costs but there are other factors such as tourism \"or simple human enjoyment.\"

___

Follow Seth Borenstein at http://twitter.com/borenbears and his work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/seth-borenstein

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January 14, 2016

Belleville News-Democrat

Townships are a form of welfare \u2014 for government employees

Taxes are necessary for the common good, right? So there is a special responsibility for those who take our taxes to ensure the money is spent efficiently, used frugally and delivers value.

Examine the finances of a township government and you will have a tough time believing anyone involved cares anything about those standards.

Townships exist in the netherworld between the layers of municipal and county government. In rural areas they often care for roads, but in municipal areas they often care for their own.

Belleville Township, East St. Louis Township and Granite City Township have no roads. They exist exactly within the boundaries of their respective cities.

So what is their purpose? They deliver an amount set by state law at up to $245 a month per needy person who is not a child, not elderly and not on another government program. That's a pretty limited mission and a haphazard way to help the poor.

Belleville Township, which took state action and nearly required an Act of God to start its long, continuing demise, was delivering 19 cents in aid for every $1 taxed. East St. Louis Township, which convicted former supervisor Oliver W. Hamilton was treating like his personal ATM, delivered 18 cents in aid for every $1 taxed.

Granite City Township and East St. Louis Township each collected just about $1.6 million from taxpayers in 2015. But even with all the corruption and thievery taking place in East St. Louis Township, it still managed to hand the poor more aid than did Granite City Township. Granite City Township handed out $189,500, which would be less than 12 cents of every $1 taxed.

Like the other townships, Granite City Township exists for its employees, not for the residents. Forty-seven people drew paychecks from the township totaling $865,839 in 2015. Their retirement costs came close to the amount of assistance delivered. They had about $700,000 in cash assets \u2014 excess money collected from taxpayers.

Unlike the other townships, Granite City does offer the town hall as a senior center where you can play pinochle on Tuesday afternoons. It also houses an assessor's office that took one-quarter of the $1.6 million. There is a meals on wheels program. There is a senior van, which duplicates the county transit services.

But like every township, the legitimate government functions can be absorbed by a municipality or the county. The charity functions can be absorbed by a church or a real charity.

If there was once a legitimate public need that these three townships fulfilled, it is long past. Illinois can afford to shed some of its nation-leading 6,963 layers of local government, and you can't afford for them all to continue.

___

January 13, 2016

Chicago Tribune

Can Paul Vallas save the struggling university?

At Chicago Public Schools, he reversed years of budget deficits without begging the General Assembly for a bailout. He did here what he replicated elsewhere: He swung a sledgehammer. Fearless and focused, Vallas wasn't afraid to take Chicago's public school system to the studs, then rebuild.\"

That's what we said about former Chicago Public Schools CEO Paul Vallas when Gov. Pat Quinn picked him as his running mate. We smiled then and we smile even more now as Vallas joins the board of trustees at another educational institution desperately in need of reform: Chicago State University.

Vallas will need to wield that fiscal sledgehammer in his new role starting Monday. And he'll need that fearless, no-nonsense attitude at a university with a long history of mismanagement, cronyism and academic failure.

Here's what CSU can count on: Vallas will focus on educating students. On boosting graduation rates. On sweeping aside sclerotic policies and patronage hires from previous regimes.

Vallas and other new board members named by Gov. Bruce Rauner \u2014 Chicago attorneys Tiffany Harper and Nicholas Gowen and World Sport Chicago Executive Director Kam Buckner \u2014 face a daunting challenge to rescue CSU. The university could exhaust its financial reserves before the end of the academic year, forcing more cuts unless there's an infusion of state cash.

In recent days more bad news, borne of years of cronyism and mismanagement: The cash-parched university agreed to pay more than $1 million to end a lawsuit brought by former high-ranking administrator Glenn Meeks, who claimed he was fired after reporting alleged misconduct by the school's former president, Wayne Watson.

The university itself could be on the hook for a potential settlement of $5 million or more to former university attorney James Crowley, who also alleged misconduct by Watson.

Remember, CSU also shelled out $600,000 last fall to oust former president Thomas Calhoun Jr., who'd spent only nine months on the job. Why? The board never offered an explanation.

Last fall, we urged Gov. Rauner to fire CSU board members who voted to oust Calhoun without a candid public explanation and to demolish the status quo. The appointment of Vallas and his colleagues to the eight-member board, assuming they're gung-ho for reform, is a terrific start.

But this won't be a quick fix. Nor can Vallas & Co. count on a windfall of state funding to help. Around the state, many universities are tightening their belts and warning that they'll barely limp through the academic year because the state's budget stalemate has crimped the flow of cash to higher education.

That's why we believe Chicago State's newly energized board should explore another option: A full-blown takeover by a stronger university. One candidate we've heard floated: the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Illinois once had a more centralized system. But in 1995, the General Assembly broke up what was known as the \"system of systems\" \u2014 four governing boards representing 12 universities \u2014 in favor of local control. That added five more governing boards. The goal: reduce administrative costs and increase accountability. The result: none of the above.

Vallas has deep experience in reviving faltering school systems to better serve students. Get ready, CSU. The sledgehammer is going to swing.

___

January 12, 2016

Rockford Register-Star

Adam Kinzinger bill a good step toward helping survivors of human trafficking

When you hear \"human trafficking\" you think of little girls being abused in countries far away from the United States.

Not so. Human trafficking - prostitution, the sex trade, human slavery - is taking place in all 50 states and is a critical issue in Illinois and the city of Rockford.

Illinois is ranked fifth nationally, and Rockford is ranked second in Illinois for human trafficking.

U.S. Rep Adam Kinzinger, R-Illinois, is aware of the magnitude of the issue and, along with Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Missouri, introduced legislation that would help health care professionals identify and help victims of human trafficking.

\"Training health care professionals, and in particular emergency room personnel, is an essential step in reaching survivors of human trafficking,\" said Jennifer Cacciapaglia, president of Rockford Alliance Against Sexual Exploitation. \"Health care professionals are in a unique position to come into contact and speak alone with victims, and we know from speaking with survivors that many of them wished a nurse or doctor would have asked the right questions.\"

The introduction of the legislation coincides with January as Human Trafficking Awareness Month. Jan. 11 was designated as Human Trafficking Awareness Day in 2007.

The Stop, Observe, Ask and Respond (SOAR) to Health and Wellness Act, H.R. 5405, would support training for health care professionals who could encounter victims of human trafficking.

\"I'm proud to be an original co-sponsor of the SOAR Act, and I believe this pilot program will have a significant impact towards identifying cases of human trafficking and helping more victims across the country from this disgusting crime,\" Kinzinger said in a statement released Wednesday.

Wagner is a longtime advocate of legislation combating sex trafficking and online exploitation of minors.

\"This legislation will provide health care providers on all levels with the appropriate training and tools necessary to identify and report potential cases of human trafficking,\" Wagner said in a statement. \"With tens of thousands of victims being trafficked in the United States each year, I am happy to work with my colleagues across the aisle to introduce and quickly pass this legislation.\"

Human trafficking is NOT a victimless crime. The average age of a girl lured into the sex trade is 13-14 years old. That's a very vulnerable age when girls can easily be enticed by the promise of jewelry, money and love.

The International Labour Organization estimates that there are 20.9 million victims of human trafficking globally and that human trafficking is a $150 billion industry. Of the victims, 68 percent were trapped in forced labor; 26 percent were children, and 55 percent were women and girls.

Although there is no official estimate of the number of human trafficking victims in the U.S., Polaris, a nonprofit that works to combat and prevent modern-day slavery and human trafficking, estimates that the number of victims nationally reaches into the hundreds of thousands.

In 2015, an estimated 1 out of 5 runaways reported to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children were likely child sex trafficking victims.

Pimps use a variety of psychological and physical abuse to keep young girls and women in their stables. Survivors have rates of post traumatic stress disorder that exceed those of Vietnam War veterans.

Survivors need programs that provide safe shelter, access resources and deliver services designed for those who have experienced trauma.

The SOAR legislation is a step toward getting the survivors the appropriate help.

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NORTH LIBERTY, Iowa (AP) \u2014 Police say an Iowa man who claimed he was shot by a random gunman was actually the victim of an accidental shooting.

Police in North Liberty say the victim was shot in the leg and his condition is stable.

Officers are still investigating the circumstances surrounding Monday's shooting at the Golfview Mobile Home Court. It's not clear whether the victim, who has not been identified, shot himself or someone else did.

Initially, the victim told police that he didn't know the gunman. A witness reported that a man wearing a dark colored hoodie shot the victim with a handgun and flew on foot through the trailer court.

Further investigation revealed that the original report was false.

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DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) \u2014 Two education initiatives created to improve Iowa schools could be at risk of delay or even disposal due to budget shortfalls.

The Des Moines Register (http://dmreg.co/2jwlEh0 ) reports that the state Department of Education has not requested money from Iowa to implement a crucial summer reading program as part of the state's third-grade retention law. Starting in the spring of next year, third-graders reading below grade level will be required to either repeat the grade or go to an intensive summer reading program to move on to the next year.

The second initiative would switch schools from the current statewide exams to computer-based tests, which adjust the difficulty level of math or reading questions based on the students' answers.

Iowa lawmakers are struggling with a $110 million budget shortfall, and are unsure if enough funding is available for the initiatives.

___

Information from: The Des Moines Register, http://www.desmoinesregister.com

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UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, Iowa (AP) \u2014 The mayor of University Heights has resigned.

Wally Heitman said in a posting Sunday on the city website that he had to step down to deal with a personal issue.

Heitman was a successful write-in candidate in the November 2015 election. On Thursday the City Council is expected to discuss appointing a replacement or holding a special election.

The community of about 1,100 residents sits just south of the University of Iowa and is surrounded by Iowa City.

"}, {"id":"0b950118-63b9-5189-88b0-5c2c18df6773","type":"article","starttime":"1484743899","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T06:51:39-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"illinois":"news/state-and-regional/illinois"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Bowling team aboard school bus that rolled; minor injuries","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/state-and-regional/illinois/article_0b950118-63b9-5189-88b0-5c2c18df6773.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/state-and-regional/illinois/bowling-team-aboard-school-bus-that-rolled-minor-injuries/article_0b950118-63b9-5189-88b0-5c2c18df6773.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/state-and-regional/illinois/bowling-team-aboard-school-bus-that-rolled-minor-injuries/article_0b950118-63b9-5189-88b0-5c2c18df6773.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"JUSTICE, Ill. (AP) \u2014 Officials say a school bus that rolled over on Interstate 294 in Illinois was carrying members of a high school bowling team. Minor injuries were reported. Authorities say the driver of the bus, who wasn't identified, suffered a seizure as he drove the bus Tuesday in the southbound lanes of the interstate outside Chicago. State police say there were 12 female Resurrection College Prep High School students and a coach aboard.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","illinois state news","general news","sports","school athletics","accidents","high school sports","accidents and disasters","transportation","education","social affairs"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"0b950118-63b9-5189-88b0-5c2c18df6773","body":"

JUSTICE, Ill. (AP) \u2014 Officials say a school bus that rolled over on Interstate 294 in Illinois was carrying members of a high school bowling team.

Minor injuries were reported. Authorities say the driver of the bus, who wasn't identified, suffered a seizure as he drove the bus Tuesday in the southbound lanes of the interstate outside Chicago. State police say there were 12 female Resurrection College Prep High School students and a coach aboard.

The driver and two passengers were taken to hospitals.

Coach Caryl King, who was on the bus, told WMAQ-TV the bus was taking the team to an area high school tournament. King says traffic was heavy at the time. She says: \"The bus started to veer to the right and all of a sudden we were seeing grass.\"

"}, {"id":"57c752f8-c59d-5ff2-afd5-10239ecb2c8a","type":"article","starttime":"1484741723","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T06:15:23-06:00","lastupdated":"1484743502","priority":0,"sections":[{"iowa":"news/state-and-regional/iowa"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Council: Iowa City won't help feds enforce immigration laws","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/state-and-regional/iowa/article_57c752f8-c59d-5ff2-afd5-10239ecb2c8a.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/state-and-regional/iowa/council-iowa-city-won-t-help-feds-enforce-immigration-laws/article_57c752f8-c59d-5ff2-afd5-10239ecb2c8a.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/state-and-regional/iowa/council-iowa-city-won-t-help-feds-enforce-immigration-laws/article_57c752f8-c59d-5ff2-afd5-10239ecb2c8a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) \u2014 Iowa City leaders have decided the city won't help federal officials enforce immigration law. The City Council voted unanimously Tuesday for a resolution that says the city \u2014 with few exceptions \u2014 will take no law enforcement action and won't spend any city money to aid the feds.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","iowa state news","general news","municipal governments","immigration policy","immigration","local governments","government and politics","government policy","social issues","social affairs"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"57c752f8-c59d-5ff2-afd5-10239ecb2c8a","body":"

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) \u2014 Iowa City leaders have decided the city won't help federal officials enforce immigration law.

The City Council voted unanimously Tuesday for a resolution that says the city \u2014 with few exceptions \u2014 will take no law enforcement action and won't spend any city money to aid the feds.

The council decided at a previous meeting not to declare itself a \"sanctuary city.\"

The resolution says the enforcement exceptions include public safety threats as determined by local police and situations in which cooperation with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement would be necessary to protect the public.

The resolution says the \"power to regulate immigration is exclusive to the federal government\" and notes that no federal law requires city police to help enforce immigration law.

"}, {"id":"925fac6f-0e83-53ea-b3a4-a2006664d86c","type":"article","starttime":"1484739294","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T05:34:54-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"iowa":"news/state-and-regional/iowa"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Stop the Bleed program coming to West Des Moines","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/state-and-regional/iowa/article_925fac6f-0e83-53ea-b3a4-a2006664d86c.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/state-and-regional/iowa/stop-the-bleed-program-coming-to-west-des-moines/article_925fac6f-0e83-53ea-b3a4-a2006664d86c.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/state-and-regional/iowa/stop-the-bleed-program-coming-to-west-des-moines/article_925fac6f-0e83-53ea-b3a4-a2006664d86c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"WEST DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) \u2014 A new program in West Des Moines plans to turn members of the public into first responders who can save lives by stopping people from bleeding to death. The Des Moines Register reports (http://dmreg.co/2j8A5V3 ) that the Stop the Bleed program was launched by the Department of Homeland Security after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Connecticut, where 26 students and staff members were killed in December 2012. The program aims to train people for such emergencies and supply local businesses with bleeding control kits stocked with gauze and tourniquets.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","iowa state news","general news"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":1,"commentID":"925fac6f-0e83-53ea-b3a4-a2006664d86c","body":"

WEST DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) \u2014 A new program in West Des Moines plans to turn members of the public into first responders who can save lives by stopping people from bleeding to death.

The Des Moines Register reports (http://dmreg.co/2j8A5V3 ) that the Stop the Bleed program was launched by the Department of Homeland Security after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Connecticut, where 26 students and staff members were killed in December 2012. The program aims to train people for such emergencies and supply local businesses with bleeding control kits stocked with gauze and tourniquets.

David Edgar is assistant chief of West Des Moines' Emergency Medical Services, and he says program wants to make knowing how to stop bleeding as commonplace as knowing CPR and the Heimlich maneuver.

___

Information from: The Des Moines Register, http://www.desmoinesregister.com

"} ]