[ {"id":"b97d58ad-6b27-5af2-ba01-f803a2bea4c9","type":"article","starttime":"1496008800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-28T17:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1496011206","sections":[{"jennifer-ewoldt":"news/opinion/editorial/columnists/jennifer-ewoldt"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Rural Route 4: Spring brings planting, branding, and many other farm chores","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/jennifer-ewoldt/article_b97d58ad-6b27-5af2-ba01-f803a2bea4c9.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/jennifer-ewoldt/rural-route-spring-brings-planting-branding-and-many-other-farm/article_b97d58ad-6b27-5af2-ba01-f803a2bea4c9.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/jennifer-ewoldt/rural-route-spring-brings-planting-branding-and-many-other-farm/article_b97d58ad-6b27-5af2-ba01-f803a2bea4c9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Jennifer Ewoldt","prologue":"It\u2019s that time of year again where we seem to have too many things going on at once. Spring marks the start of a lot of different farm seasons, and the end of a few others. Somehow, they all seem to overlap. This makes for crazy schedules at our house, especially when you then throw in a few extra unexpected duties. Here\u2019s just a sample of what\u2019s going on:","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["farmer","farming","goats","soybeans","corn","ag day","blue grass elementary school","hogs","farm","agriculture","gardening","mowing","robb","combine","planting","lawn mower","baler"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"e583ac9d-1c2f-5928-9a5f-e1daa92594e5","description":"Jennifer Ewoldt, Rural Route 4 columnist","byline":"","hireswidth":1936,"hiresheight":2592,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/58/e583ac9d-1c2f-5928-9a5f-e1daa92594e5/5455c3f483d5e.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"463","height":"619","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/58/e583ac9d-1c2f-5928-9a5f-e1daa92594e5/57390af3eddf3.image.jpg?resize=463%2C619"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"133","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/58/e583ac9d-1c2f-5928-9a5f-e1daa92594e5/5455c3f4930e5.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"401","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/58/e583ac9d-1c2f-5928-9a5f-e1daa92594e5/5455c3f493ac1.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1369","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/58/e583ac9d-1c2f-5928-9a5f-e1daa92594e5/57390af3eddf3.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"b97d58ad-6b27-5af2-ba01-f803a2bea4c9","body":"

It\u2019s that time of year again where we seem to have too many things going on at once. Spring marks the start of a lot of different farm seasons, and the end of a few others. Somehow, they all seem to overlap. This makes for crazy schedules at our house, especially when you then throw in a few extra unexpected duties. Here\u2019s just a sample of what\u2019s going on:

We have about one more day of planting left to get the last of the soybeans planted. Then planting for 2017 will be complete. Unfortunately, we are still waiting for a couple of dry days in a row to allow us to complete this task. This week's forecast is looking good, so I\u2019m hoping we can finish before June officially starts. Robb was hoping to get the last of the beans in the ground on Friday, but that torrential downpour at lunchtime put a stop to that idea.

We also have hay that needs to be cut and baled, but same problem \u2014 not enough dry days. The hay is getting a little more mature than we would like in some fields, which of course means that it could lose some of its nutritional value or become too stemmy. Again, I\u2019m really hoping that this coming week will allow us to get a lot of hay mowed and baled, to get a good start on the hay season.

We had our annual spring branding this weekend, which luckily had good weather, though the ground was wet and muddy. The rainfall and mud made it a little challenging to get cattle rounded up, because we had some creeks where the crossings had been washed out. Most horses wouldn\u2019t cross it, and some of the cattle didn\u2019t want to cross either. But, we got branding done in record time with the help of a lot of friends. It\u2019s always a great day of working together and having fun. Honestly, sometimes it just feels like a big social gathering.

We have also begun shipping out hogs from our hog buildings. They are already big enough for market, so the semi loads are heading out. It\u2019s still hard to believe sometimes that pigs can grow from 7 to 280 pounds in less than 6 months. Just amazing to me.

Lawn mowing is also in full gear \u2014 both at the farm and at home. The boys have both passed their lawn mower driver\u2019s test with Robb, so are in charge of mowing Grandma\u2019s lawn now at the farm. It\u2019s good to have some helpers, as there are several acres of lawn to mow \u2014 or so it feels.

We had a couple of problems with horses in the past two weeks. One managed to cut his leg on something in the pasture, causing a big wound on his leg. I suspect he tried to stick his leg through a fence, and tore the skin pulling his leg back out, but we will never know. That has made for a lot of extra work, changing bandages daily after work. My horse did something to her foot, and also needs some care. She was unable to participate much in branding weekend because she was a little lame on that foot also, so I didn\u2019t get to ride as much as I wanted to.

We spent Friday last week at Blue Grass Elementary School for Ag Day \u2014 a great day where all sorts of local farmers and folks with related jobs come to teach the kids about what they do. This great event is spearheaded by teacher Mrs. Moorhead, and is the highlight of some kids\u2019 school year. We are in charge of bringing farm equipment, so this year we took in a tractor and planter. In previous years we have taken a combine and a baler \u2014 we try to mix it up every year. We love teaching the kids about farming, and answering all their questions. They are so full of energy and excitement about everything they see.

Lastly, there\u2019s the end of school coming up this week, and the end of soccer season is in sight, and I believe by the time you read this, the goats will be at our farm for the 4-H project. The boys are both excited about all of the above, and are looking forward to having the time to spend more of their days on the farm. They are old enough now to really be helpful, so they may get more than they bargained for!

On this Memorial Day, may I take a moment to thank everyone who has served our country, and the families of those who have served and been lost. God bless you all, and thank you.

"}, {"id":"a3075fdb-f704-5bfe-ac93-420a5cca3d56","type":"article","starttime":"1495953900","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-28T01:45:00-05:00","sections":[{"autumn-phillips":"news/opinion/editorial/columnists/autumn-phillips"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Phillips: Making someone else's house a home","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/autumn-phillips/article_a3075fdb-f704-5bfe-ac93-420a5cca3d56.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/autumn-phillips/phillips-making-someone-else-s-house-a-home/article_a3075fdb-f704-5bfe-ac93-420a5cca3d56.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/autumn-phillips/phillips-making-someone-else-s-house-a-home/article_a3075fdb-f704-5bfe-ac93-420a5cca3d56.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Autumn Phillips\nExecutive Editor","prologue":"I\u2019ll admit that I was nervous. The night before, I made sure the floors were spotless. I pulled all the weeds. I roped a friend into a Sunday afternoon of spraying white paint on the railings leading up to the front door. Moments before she arrived, I stood for a moment on the sidewalk to make sure the lines in the mowed lawn were straight.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["fran hansen","building industry","gastronomy","doorknob","drawer","cheese souffle","wallpaper","room","living room"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"personality","images":[{"id":"fa0afc1f-8444-57ce-9bf3-79de1c2b899d","description":"Autumn Phillips","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"400","height":"475","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/a0/fa0afc1f-8444-57ce-9bf3-79de1c2b899d/572d04708fc15.image.jpg?resize=400%2C475"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"118","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/a0/fa0afc1f-8444-57ce-9bf3-79de1c2b899d/5638029f97c42.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"356","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/a0/fa0afc1f-8444-57ce-9bf3-79de1c2b899d/572d04708fc15.image.jpg?resize=300%2C356"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1216","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/a0/fa0afc1f-8444-57ce-9bf3-79de1c2b899d/572d04708fc15.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"a3075fdb-f704-5bfe-ac93-420a5cca3d56","body":"

I\u2019ll admit that I was nervous. The night before, I made sure the floors were spotless. I pulled all the weeds. I roped a friend into a Sunday afternoon of spraying white paint on the railings leading up to the front door. Moments before she arrived, I stood for a moment on the sidewalk to make sure the lines in the mowed lawn were straight.

I wanted her to like it. It was her home, after all, for 60 years. It was her house before I bought it and started tearing up carpet and painting the living room walls Hague Blue and before I learned that there are 100 shades of taupe.

I was going to order takeout for our planned lunch at the house because it was a weekday and my schedule was busy. But it didn\u2019t feel right. So, I woke up early and went out to the garden to pull radishes and cut lettuce for a salad and I drove home 20 minutes before she arrived to whip up mini blue cheese souffles.

I heard about Fran Hansen as soon as I moved into the house. A quirk of older homes in the Quad-Cities is that, to others, your house is not yours until you move out. Fran and I joked about this as we stood in the foyer. She lived in the house for decades and people still referred to it as the Charles\u2019 house. It wasn\u2019t until I moved in, that people started calling it the Hansen house.

While I was setting the table and fussing over which seat would give her the best impression of the dining room, Fran was on her way and preparing herself not to like what I had done with the house, she told me later.

She looked around and said she liked it. \u201cI understand you,\u201d she said. We were standing in the living room talking through the changes and she saw the stereo table I made out of old wooden printers drawers found in a newspaper warehouse years ago. She showed me the wooden purse she made out of an old sewing box.

I gave her a tour of the rooms and she told me the glass doorknobs were in the house before she bought it in the 1950s. She showed me the things she had changed when she moved in to make it her own \u2013 replacing the wallpaper, filling the rooms with carefully chosen antiques. She showed me the bookcases put in by the previous owners in the 1940s and the changes she and her husband made to the fireplace mantle in the decades since.

\u201cIt took 16 rolls of wallpaper to cover that room,\u201d she said.

\u201cIt took me months to take that wallpaper down,\u201d I said. We both laughed. \u201cI feel like I got to know you during those long hours of steaming and scraping wallpaper,\u201d I said.

As we ate the souffles and salad, Fran told me some of the history of Davenport and Bettendorf as she remembered living it \u2013 memories of landmarks, stories of shopping at department stores downtown. But mostly we talked about the house. The rooms, the creaks, the yard, the neighbors.

We said goodbye after lunch, my hand on the newly painted white railing. She admitted it had been an emotional day and she was ready to rest, but we would talk more on future visits. She looked forward to our friendship, she said.

When I came back home that night after work, I noticed her visit had an interesting effect on me. It changed the way I saw the house. Seeing it through the former owner\u2019s eyes made it feel more like home, even if it won\u2019t really be mine until I leave it.

"}, {"id":"97995c54-209b-5fd3-b2e9-cfd5b1a6ed11","type":"article","starttime":"1495953000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-28T01:30:00-05:00","sections":[{"guest":"news/opinion/editorial/columnists/guest"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Guest view: Reynolds is a symbol of what should come","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/guest/article_97995c54-209b-5fd3-b2e9-cfd5b1a6ed11.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/guest/guest-view-reynolds-is-a-symbol-of-what-should-come/article_97995c54-209b-5fd3-b2e9-cfd5b1a6ed11.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/guest/guest-view-reynolds-is-a-symbol-of-what-should-come/article_97995c54-209b-5fd3-b2e9-cfd5b1a6ed11.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Tiffany O\u2019Donnell","prologue":"Iowa\u2019s 43rd governor will go down in history as one of the \u201cfirsts\u201d for women in this state, just like Iowan Julia Addington did in 1869 becoming the first woman in the United States elected to office (Mitchell County) and Burlington\u2019s Arabella Mansfield did in 1869 becoming the first female attorney in the U.S. We couldn\u2019t be more proud to have Kim Reynolds add her name to the history books as our first female governor of Iowa.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["kim reynolds","commerce","politics","finance","iowa","company","economics","state","arabella mansfield","director","leadership"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"0d5df0e7-efdd-5f9e-98e8-388b6fb0f60c","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2848,"hiresheight":4288,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d5/0d5df0e7-efdd-5f9e-98e8-388b6fb0f60c/592878dc8d2b2.hires.jpg","presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1173","height":"1766","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d5/0d5df0e7-efdd-5f9e-98e8-388b6fb0f60c/592878dc39d96.image.jpg?resize=1173%2C1766"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"151","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d5/0d5df0e7-efdd-5f9e-98e8-388b6fb0f60c/592878dc39d96.image.jpg?resize=100%2C151"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"452","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d5/0d5df0e7-efdd-5f9e-98e8-388b6fb0f60c/592878dc39d96.image.jpg?resize=300%2C452"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1542","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d5/0d5df0e7-efdd-5f9e-98e8-388b6fb0f60c/592878dc39d96.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1542"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"97995c54-209b-5fd3-b2e9-cfd5b1a6ed11","body":"

Iowa\u2019s 43rd governor will go down in history as one of the \u201cfirsts\u201d for women in this state, just like Iowan Julia Addington did in 1869 becoming the first woman in the United States elected to office (Mitchell County) and Burlington\u2019s Arabella Mansfield did in 1869 becoming the first female attorney in the U.S. We couldn\u2019t be more proud to have Kim Reynolds add her name to the history books as our first female governor of Iowa.

IWLC points to Iowa women over and over as those who, individually, have broken down cultural and organizational barriers. While we honor and celebrate these achievements, we still have a long way to go. Even with notable successes, we are forced to ask, \u201cWhat is still holding us back?\u201d

50 percent of Iowa\u2019s population is women. So why are women only:

\u2022 25 percent of leadership in private, for-profit companies

\u2022 22 percent of leadership in publicly traded companies

\u2022 16 percent of board members of publicly traded companies

\u2022 28 percent of elected officials at local, state and federal level

Why is that? Among the top two reasons:

Cultural: We (women) don\u2019t raise our hands quickly enough. We want experience in 10 out of 10 qualifications for a new job before we even apply (he\u2019ll apply with six or less and learn the rest when he gets there). Men: You know this now. No excuses. Tap her on the shoulder and tell her she\u2019d be perfect for that promotion.

Organizational: Change is hard. It\u2019s hard hiring people who don\u2019t look like us. A friend of mine who is the Chief Administrative Officer at Patagonia said he asked his leadership team in Japan, all male, to intentionally bring him 3 qualified female candidates in addition to the dozen male applicants. When they said \u201cThey don\u2019t exist,\u201d he repeated \u201cGo find me three qualified female candidates.\u201d Guess who got the job? I hear she\u2019s doing very well in her new position. This isn\u2019t about quotas, it\u2019s about being intentional about bringing all talent to the table.

Companies that lead the way not only understand the social responsibility, but point to the clear business case for women in leadership at all levels. For example, statistics from Catalyst show that companies with the highest representation of women on their board have a better:

\u2022 Return on Equity: On average, companies with the highest percentages of women board directors outperformed those with the least by 53 percent.

\u2022 Return on Sales: On average, companies with the highest percentages of women board directors outperformed those with the least by 42 percent.

\u2022 Return on Invested Capital: On average, companies with the highest percentages of women board directors outperformed those with the least by 66 percent.

Iowa is a state with an impressive record of leveraging all available talent to attain the best results. In addition to leading the way by putting women in new places of leadership, it\u2019s also the state that in 1848 became the first state to allow unmarried women to own property. In 1857, the University of Iowa became the first university to allow women as students. And in1869 became the first state to allow women to be admitted to the Bar.

Here\u2019s to Gov. Kim Reynolds for raising her hand and saying \u201cyes\u201d when her predecessor, Gov. Branstad, tapped her on the shoulder. Ladies and gentlemen: let\u2019s keep making history.

"}, {"id":"5aaadebd-463c-5c59-aa00-d686fea0fba3","type":"article","starttime":"1495951200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-28T01:00:00-05:00","sections":[{"charles-krauthammer":"news/opinion/editorial/columnists/charles-krauthammer"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Krauthammer: Middle East peace starts in Saudi Arabia","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/charles-krauthammer/article_5aaadebd-463c-5c59-aa00-d686fea0fba3.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/charles-krauthammer/krauthammer-middle-east-peace-starts-in-saudi-arabia/article_5aaadebd-463c-5c59-aa00-d686fea0fba3.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/charles-krauthammer/krauthammer-middle-east-peace-starts-in-saudi-arabia/article_5aaadebd-463c-5c59-aa00-d686fea0fba3.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Charles Krauthammer","prologue":"The quixotic American pursuit of Middle East peace is a perennial. It invariably fails, yet every administration feels compelled to give it a try. The Trump administration is no different. It will fail as well. To be sure, no great harm has, as yet, come from President Trump's enthusiasm for what would be \"the ultimate deal.\" It will, however, distract and detract from remarkable progress being made elsewhere in the Middle East.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["israel","politics","state","trump","reconciliation","saudi arabia","middle east","iran"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"1cfb04d5-060e-53c8-949b-00279d8359fc","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"236","height":"308","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cf/1cfb04d5-060e-53c8-949b-00279d8359fc/572d08e078038.image.jpg?resize=236%2C308"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"130","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cf/1cfb04d5-060e-53c8-949b-00279d8359fc/567c688d468cb.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"392","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cf/1cfb04d5-060e-53c8-949b-00279d8359fc/572d08e078038.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1336","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/cf/1cfb04d5-060e-53c8-949b-00279d8359fc/572d08e078038.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"5aaadebd-463c-5c59-aa00-d686fea0fba3","body":"

The quixotic American pursuit of Middle East peace is a perennial. It invariably fails, yet every administration feels compelled to give it a try. The Trump administration is no different.

It will fail as well. To be sure, no great harm has, as yet, come from President Trump's enthusiasm for what would be \"the ultimate deal.\" It will, however, distract and detract from remarkable progress being made elsewhere in the Middle East.

That progress began with Trump's trip to Saudi Arabia, the first of his presidency -- an unmistakable declaration of a radical reorientation of U.S. policy in the region. Message: The appeasement of Iran is over.

Barack Obama's tilt toward Iran in the great Muslim civil war between Shiite Iran and Sunni Arabs led by Saudi Arabia was his reach for Nixon-to-China glory. It ended ignominiously.

The idea that the nuclear deal would make Iran more moderate has proved spectacularly wrong, as demonstrated by its defiant ballistic missile launches, its indispensable support for the genocidal Assad regime in Syria, its backing of the Houthi insurgency in Yemen, its worldwide support for terrorism, its relentless anti-Americanism and commitment to the annihilation of Israel.

These aggressions were supposed to abate. They didn't. On the contrary, the cash payments and the lifting of economic sanctions -- Tehran's reward for the nuclear deal -- have only given its geopolitical thrusts more power and reach.

The reversal has now begun. The first act was Trump's Riyadh address to about 50 Muslim states (the overwhelming majority of them Sunni) signaling a wide Islamic alliance committed to resisting Iran and willing to cast its lot with the American side.

That was objective No.1. The other was to turn the Sunni powers against Sunni terrorism. The Islamic State is Sunni. Al-Qaeda is Sunni. Fifteen of the 9/11 hijackers were Saudi. And the spread of Saudi-funded madrassas around the world has for decades inculcated a poisonous Wahhabism that has fueled Islamist terrorism.

Saudi Arabia and the other Gulf states publicly declaring war on their bastard terrorist child is significant. As is their pledge not to tolerate any semiofficial support or private donations. And their opening during the summit of an anti-terrorism center in Riyadh.

After eight years of U.S. policy hovering between neglect and betrayal, the Sunni Arabs are relieved to have America back. A salutary side effect is the possibility of a detente with Israel.

That would suggest an outside-in approach to Arab-Israeli peace: a rapprochement between the Sunni state and Israel (the outside) would put pressure on the Palestinians to come to terms (the inside). It's a long-shot strategy but it's better than all the others. Unfortunately, Trump muddied the waters a bit in Israel by at times reverting to the opposite strategy -- the inside-out -- by saying that an Israeli-Palestinian deal would \"begin a process of peace all throughout the Middle East.\"

That is well-worn nonsense. Imagine if Israel disappeared tomorrow in an earthquake. Does that end the civil war in Syria? The instability in Iraq? The fighting in Yemen? Does it change anything of consequence amid the intra-Arab chaos? Of course not.

And apart from being delusional, the inside-out strategy is at present impossible. Palestinian leadership is both hopelessly weak and irredeemably rejectionist. Until it is prepared to accept the legitimacy of the Jewish state -- which it has never done in the 100 years since the Balfour Declaration committed Britain to a Jewish homeland in Palestine -- there will be no peace.

It may come one day. But not now. Which is why making the Israel-Palestinian issue central, rather than peripheral, to the epic Sunni-Shiite war shaking the Middle East today is a serious tactical mistake. It subjects any now-possible reconciliation between Israel and the Arab states to a Palestinian veto.

Ironically, the Iranian threat that grew under Obama offers a unique opportunity for U.S.-Arab and even Israeli-Arab cooperation. Over time, such cooperation could gradually acclimate Arab peoples to a nonbelligerent stance toward Israel. Which might in turn help persuade the Palestinians to make some concessions before their fellow Arabs finally tire of the Palestinians' century of rejectionism.

Perhaps that will require a peace process of sorts. No great harm, as long as we remember that any such Israeli-Palestinian talks are for show -- until conditions are one day ripe for peace.

In the meantime, the real action is on the anti-Iranian and anti-terror fronts. Don't let Oslo-like mirages get in the way.

"}, {"id":"ec411078-3ccb-5a4d-9dee-363d64c407ca","type":"article","starttime":"1495915200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-27T15:00:00-05:00","sections":[{"jim-victor":"news/opinion/editorial/columnists/jim-victor"}],"application":"editorial","title":"KEY 15: Investors put aside uncertainty to resume buying","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/jim-victor/article_ec411078-3ccb-5a4d-9dee-363d64c407ca.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/jim-victor/key-investors-put-aside-uncertainty-to-resume-buying/article_ec411078-3ccb-5a4d-9dee-363d64c407ca.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/jim-victor/key-investors-put-aside-uncertainty-to-resume-buying/article_ec411078-3ccb-5a4d-9dee-363d64c407ca.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Calm persistent buying by stock investors sent broad market average higher for the first four days last week. Investors were pleased enough with both corporate and economic reports to bid shares upward for the week and upward for the Quad-City Times Key 15, lifting our area business index by 30.07 to 2127.95 (1).","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["stock market","sam allen","us federal reserve","fed","william dudley","monsanto","department of commerce","hugh grant","quad-city","area manufacturing trends","deere and co.","sale","economics","finance","company","investor","share","commerce","eldorado","april","agreement","pace"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","revision":4,"commentID":"ec411078-3ccb-5a4d-9dee-363d64c407ca","body":"

Calm persistent buying by stock investors sent broad market average higher for the first four days last week. Investors were pleased enough with both corporate and economic reports to bid shares upward for the week and upward for the Quad-City Times Key 15, lifting our area business index by 30.07 to 2127.95 (1).

Housing was the week\u2019s most insightful sector, with the Commerce Department reporting new home sales on Tuesday, which showed April unit sales down a steep 11.4 percent from March\u2019s impressive 9\u00bd-year high. The annualized April pace of 569,000 sales was uncomfortably lower than the upwardly revised March annualized pace of 612,000 units sold.

What gives? Inventories are low by historical standards, making growth more difficult, despite relatively strong consumer confidence, employment growth, and still historically low home mortgage rates. Recent months have seen strong year-over-year gains, like March\u2019s amazing 20.4 percent increase over the prior March. So, April\u2019s tiny 0.5 percent increase over last April\u2019s pace may just be a flaw in data collection by the Department. Watch for future reports.

The Wednesday report on existing home sales, however, was similarly soft. Reported by the National Association of Realtors, existing home sales fell 2.3 percent in April from March\u2019s pace, now to a 5.57 million unit annualized pace. Here, sales were up just a modest 1.6 percent over last year.

This housing report also begged explanation. And the national association explained that here, too, low inventories of available homes were to blame. The association says inventory levels are 9 percent below one year ago, and inventories have been lower than the comparable month of the prior year for 23 consecutives months. In short, a shortage of homes offered is a major factor in the decline of home sales.

If homes sales were short of expectations and short of prior month paces, investors were not at all disturbed by the reports, arguably regarding the situation as temporary. Federal Reserve Board meeting minutes, out Wednesday afternoon, surely suggested as much. They noted that the committee members felt that any observed slowness in certain economic sectors was likely to be short-lived. And, they believed that the continued overall growth, evidenced by employment growth, meant \u201cit would soon be appropriate for the committee to take another step\u201d in raising those short term \u201cfed funds\u201d interest rates. Their next scheduled meeting at which time such an action might occurs is June.

Closer to home, Arconic announced on Monday morning that a truce had been reached with its dissident shareholder, Elliott Management, a hedge fund that controlled more than 13 percent of Arconic shares. The truce and peace agreement ended a month\u2019s long costly and bruising proxy fight brought on by Elliott\u2019s desire to unseat Arconic\u2019s CEO Klaus Kleinfeld and to win control of the board of directors.

In recent weeks, Kleinfeld had resigned after sending a letter to Elliott\u2019s management that was not approved by Arconic\u2019s board. And, the new agreement allowed for more Elliott-nominated board members as well as Elliott representation on the search committee. What\u2019s it mean? For Quad-Citians and shareholders, it means management can go back to work on growing revenues and profits in the important aerospace and automotive aluminum markets served by growing operations right here. Arconic shares were off 15 cents at $27.42 (1) last week.

Meanwhile on Monday, Archer Daniels Midland, with Clinton grain processing, announced completion of its big expansion and modernization of its grain export terminal in Santos, Brazil. Celebrating 20 years in Brazil in 2017, ADM added another ship unloading line, a fourth truck unloading station, an increase in handling capacity and in storage capacity. ADM says the 33 percent jump in handling capacity enhances its ability to connect Brazilin crops to the world. ADM shares gained 95 cents last week to 442.55 (1).

And, even as Eldorado Resorts last month acquired Isle of Capri with Bettendorf gaming operations, so also a company called Hotel Casino Management, Inc. had been accumulating shares of Eldorado, reporting 10.9 percent of the shares owned by the company in March. But new filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission show that the stake has been reduced to 5.8 percent, with no further direction nor intent reported. Quad-Citians will await the next report. Eldorado shares were up 85 cents at $20.55 (1) last week.

June starts with important new reports on May employment on Thursday and Friday. But, all this follows our Memorial Day national observance of respect for those who have given their lives to protect our wonderful personal and economic freedom. God bless them. And, God bless America.

"}, {"id":"0f3357c6-3df9-5b4a-a830-d76adbb77330","type":"article","starttime":"1495864800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-27T01:00:00-05:00","sections":[{"david-ignatius":"news/opinion/editorial/columnists/david-ignatius"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Ignatius: A path forward in Syria and Iraq, post-ISIS","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/david-ignatius/article_0f3357c6-3df9-5b4a-a830-d76adbb77330.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/david-ignatius/ignatius-a-path-forward-in-syria-and-iraq-post-isis/article_0f3357c6-3df9-5b4a-a830-d76adbb77330.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/david-ignatius/ignatius-a-path-forward-in-syria-and-iraq-post-isis/article_0f3357c6-3df9-5b4a-a830-d76adbb77330.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"David Ignatius","prologue":"The Manchester terror attack by an alleged Islamic State \"soldier\" will accelerate the push by the U.S. and its allies to capture the terror group's strongholds in Mosul and Raqqah. But it should also focus some urgent discussions about a post-ISIS strategy for stabilizing Iraq and Syria. For all President Trump's bombast about obliterating the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, the Raqqah campaign has been delayed for months while U.S. policymakers debated the wisdom of relying on a Syrian Kurdish militia known as the YPG that Turkey regards as a terrorist group. That group and allied Sunni fighters have been poised less than 10 miles from Raqqah, waiting for a decision.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["raqqah","politics","institutes","ministries","iraq","u.s.","kurds","terror","syria","referendum"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"12464ac6-e66c-5c1c-8d82-2fe8eb6f4c7b","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"406","height":"406","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/24/12464ac6-e66c-5c1c-8d82-2fe8eb6f4c7b/572cfa9b33f69.image.jpg?resize=406%2C406"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"100","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/24/12464ac6-e66c-5c1c-8d82-2fe8eb6f4c7b/567c762623228.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"300","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/24/12464ac6-e66c-5c1c-8d82-2fe8eb6f4c7b/572cfa9b33f69.image.jpg?resize=300%2C300"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1024","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/24/12464ac6-e66c-5c1c-8d82-2fe8eb6f4c7b/572cfa9b33f69.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"0f3357c6-3df9-5b4a-a830-d76adbb77330","body":"

The Manchester terror attack by an alleged Islamic State \"soldier\" will accelerate the push by the U.S. and its allies to capture the terror group's strongholds in Mosul and Raqqah. But it should also focus some urgent discussions about a post-ISIS strategy for stabilizing Iraq and Syria.

For all President Trump's bombast about obliterating the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, the Raqqah campaign has been delayed for months while U.S. policymakers debated the wisdom of relying on a Syrian Kurdish militia known as the YPG that Turkey regards as a terrorist group. That group and allied Sunni fighters have been poised less than 10 miles from Raqqah, waiting for a decision.

All the while, the clock has been ticking on terror plots hatched by ISIS and directed from Raqqah. U.S. officials told me a few weeks ago they were aware of at least five ISIS operations directed against targets in Europe. European allies have been urging the U.S. to finish the job in Raqqah as soon as possible.

The horrific Manchester bombing is a reminder of the difficulty of containing the plots hatched in ISIS -- and the cost of waiting to strike the final blows. ISIS is battered and in retreat, and its caliphate is nearly destroyed on the ground. But a virtual caliphate survives in the network that spawned Salman Abedi, the alleged Manchester bomber, and others who seek to avenge the group's slow eradication.

The Raqqah assault should move ahead quickly, now that the Trump administration has rejected Turkish protests and opted to back the YPG as the backbone of a broader coalition known as the Syrian Democratic Forces. These are committed, well-led fighters, as I saw during a visit to a special forces training camp in northern Syria a year ago.

The Trump administration listened patiently to Turkish arguments for an alternative force backed by Ankara. But the Pentagon concluded that this force didn't have any real battlefield presence, and that the real choice was either relying on the Kurdish-led coalition to clear Raqqah or sending in thousands of U.S. troops to do the job.

The White House rightly opted for the first approach several weeks ago. To ease Ankara's worries, the U.S. is offering assurances that the Kurdish military presence will be contained, and that newly recruited Sunni tribal forces will help manage security in Raqqah and nearby Deir el-Zour.

The endgame is near in Mosul, too. Commanders say that only about 6 percent of the city remains to be captured, with 500 to 700 ISIS fighters hunkered down in the old city west of the Tigris River.

Once Raqqah and Mosul are cleared, the challenge will be rebuilding the Sunni areas of Syria and Iraq -- with real governance and security -- so that follow-on extremist groups don't quickly emerge. This idea of preparing for the \"day after\" ISIS has gotten lip service from U.S. policymakers for three years, but very little serious planning or funding. It should be an urgent priority for the U.S. and its key Sunni partners, such as Jordan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

Intelligence services from several key allies are said to have met in recent weeks with Sunni leaders from Iraq to form a core leadership that can take the initiative. But so far, this effort is said to have produced more internal bickering than clear strategy -- a depressing rewind of failed efforts to build a coherent Sunni opposition in Syria.

CIA Director Mike Pompeo told me and several other journalists in an interview Tuesday that he plans to move the agency to a more aggressive, risk-taking stance. Here's a place to start.

The Kurds are the wild cards in both Iraq and Syria. The Syrian Kurds are already governing the ethnic enclave they call \"Rojava.\" That should be an incentive for Syria's Sunnis to develop similar strong government in their liberated areas. Meanwhile, Iraqi Kurds have told U.S. officials they plan to hold a referendum on Kurdish independence soon, perhaps as early as September.

U.S. officials feel a deep gratitude toward Iraqi Kurds, who have been reliable allies since the early 1990s. But the independence referendum is a potential flashpoint, and U.S. officials may try to defer the Kurdish question until well after Iraqi provincial elections scheduled in September.

Iraq and Syria need to be reimagined as looser, better governed, more inclusive confederal states that give minorities room to breathe. The trick for policymakers is to make the post-ISIS transition a pathway toward progress, rather than a continuation of the sectarian catastrophe that has befallen both nations.

"}, {"id":"de15344a-4a87-5f78-a41c-61afaff4eb08","type":"article","starttime":"1495821600","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-26T13:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1495829288","sections":[{"erin-murphy":"news/opinion/editorial/columnists/erin-murphy"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Murphy: An assault won't silence journalists","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/erin-murphy/article_de15344a-4a87-5f78-a41c-61afaff4eb08.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/erin-murphy/murphy-an-assault-won-t-silence-journalists/article_de15344a-4a87-5f78-a41c-61afaff4eb08.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/opinion/editorial/columnists/erin-murphy/murphy-an-assault-won-t-silence-journalists/article_de15344a-4a87-5f78-a41c-61afaff4eb08.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Erin Murphy\nTimes Des Moines Bureau","prologue":"It was another rough week for political reporters. Well, one in particular. I know Ben Jacobs. Some of you may as well. He was here in Iowa a lot during the 2016 caucuses. For those who may not know, Jacobs is a reporter who covers U.S. politics for the U.K. newspaper The Guardian. On Wednesday night, on the eve of a special Congressional election in Montana, Jacobs was body-slammed, he said, by Republican candidate Greg Gianforte after Jacobs tried to ask Gianforte about the estimated impact of U.S. House Republicans\u2019 health-care reform bill. An audio recording seemed to confirm his account.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["reporter","politics","journalism","ben jacobs","assault","journalist","greg gianforte","steve thomma","press"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"e697f14a-22ae-5002-8064-d49ad58ef537","description":"Erin Murphy","byline":"","hireswidth":2000,"hiresheight":3000,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e697f14a-22ae-5002-8064-d49ad58ef537/540d228749b7c.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"413","height":"619","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e697f14a-22ae-5002-8064-d49ad58ef537/587920e648ca6.image.jpg?resize=413%2C619"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e697f14a-22ae-5002-8064-d49ad58ef537/540d228756f25.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"229","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e697f14a-22ae-5002-8064-d49ad58ef537/587920e648ca6.image.jpg?crop=406%2C310%2C2%2C66&resize=300%2C229&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"782","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e697f14a-22ae-5002-8064-d49ad58ef537/587920e648ca6.image.jpg?crop=406%2C310%2C2%2C66"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"de15344a-4a87-5f78-a41c-61afaff4eb08","body":"

It was another rough week for political reporters. Well, one in particular.

I know Ben Jacobs. Some of you may as well. He was here in Iowa a lot during the 2016 caucuses.

For those who may not know, Jacobs is a reporter who covers U.S. politics for the U.K. newspaper The Guardian. On Wednesday night, on the eve of a special Congressional election in Montana, Jacobs was body-slammed, he said, by Republican candidate Greg Gianforte after Jacobs tried to ask Gianforte about the estimated impact of U.S. House Republicans\u2019 health-care reform bill. An audio recording seemed to confirm his account.

Gianforte was charged with assaulting Jacobs, a misdemeanor.

The next day, Gianforte won the election.

He never did answer that question about the health care reform bill.

It\u2019s the latest --- and certainly most violent --- incident in what has become, for this reporter at least, an unsettling trend of increasing hazards for political journalists.

In recent months other journalists also trying to ask questions of people in positions of government power have been arrested and pinned against a wall by security guards.

Jacobs handled his incident with aplomb, even joking with a New York Times reporter who called for a story on the incident. While still in the hospital, Jacobs asked that the New York Times not post its story online before Jacobs had a chance to post his story because he did not want to be scooped on an incident in which he was involved.

I am pleased to report that Jacobs has emerged from his brief stint as professional wrestling heel relatively unscathed.

Equally upsetting as journalists being physically attacked and arrested for nothing more than doing their jobs, perhaps even more so, is the disinterest with which so many people reacted.

Heck, some conservative commentators darn near celebrated the incident involving Jacobs. One Fox News personality called it a bit of \u201cMontana justice.\u201d

Many folks on the ground level, in Montana and across the country, doubted the story (even though it was confirmed in small part by the audio recording and in large part by a local Fox News television crew that witnessed it), said they were unfazed by it or even cheered it, according to various media reports.

Steve Thomma, executive director of the White House Correspondents\u2019 Association, listened to Rush Limbaugh\u2019s radio show and tweeted one quote from a caller who said, \u201cIf enough of this happens, those reporters are gonna learn to back off a little bit.\u201d

Fortunately, with only a rare few exceptions of which I am aware, I have not experienced or witnessed similar hostility toward the press in Iowa in the past couple of years. Maybe there really is something to that \u201cIowa nice\u201d thing. It would be better if that was the case everywhere else, too.

We need less anger toward and more trust of the press in this country these days. That\u2019s not a lecture and it\u2019s not laying blame at anyone\u2019s feet. I\u2019m not smart enough to know how we repair the public\u2019s trust with the press; I just know we need to, because our democracy will not function as well as it should without that relationship.

The best thing I know to do is maintain an open dialogue with readers. If someone calls or emails me, even in passionate anger, I try to respond. It may not always sway an upset reader\u2019s viewpoint, but I hope it at least helps develop a trust that I\u2019m just trying to do a job, not promote an agenda.

We need more trust in that relationship between the press and the people. Fewer gas lighters would help, too.

Speaking of which, I\u2019m sorry to disappoint that caller to Limbaugh\u2019s program who expects a few more assaults would teach reporters to \u201cback off a little bit.\u201d Unfortunately for him or her, we reporters don\u2019t learn very quickly. Pin us to the wall, arrest us, body-slam us ... we\u2019re going to keep doing our job, keep asking questions.

That reminds me, I have a quick question for Rep.-elect Gianforte: Could you give us your reaction to the CBO\u2019s impact analysis of the American Health Care Act?

"}, {"id":"4bd44c44-61e1-5f62-89ce-da20da54feb8","type":"article","starttime":"1495817100","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-26T11:45:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1495884426","sections":[{"ask-the-times":"news/local/ask-the-times"},{"roy-booker":"news/opinion/editorial/columnists/roy-booker"}],"flags":{"alert":"true","top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Ask the Times: Davenport resolves issue with YourGov app","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/ask-the-times/article_4bd44c44-61e1-5f62-89ce-da20da54feb8.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/ask-the-times/ask-the-times-davenport-resolves-issue-with-yourgov-app/article_4bd44c44-61e1-5f62-89ce-da20da54feb8.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/news/local/ask-the-times/ask-the-times-davenport-resolves-issue-with-yourgov-app/article_4bd44c44-61e1-5f62-89ce-da20da54feb8.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Q. I have been trying to use the YourGov app to report potholes in the past two weeks or more. I have used it in the past with no issues. However, now, it won't let me submit a request, saying there was a problem to upload your request. I have tried through the link on the city of Davenport website with the same issue. I have tried to reinstall the app but still cannot submit a request. I have tried by being signed in and not being signed in. What is going on and does the administration of Davenport know of this problem? \u2014\u00a0Sharon","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["davenport","iowa","quad-city times","st. louis cardinals","nicole gleason","sports center","sam j. shea","don doxsie","iowa department of transportation","game","baseball","sport","law","request","widening","a. we","cardinals","cubs","kimberly road"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"c1cf9c4d-4297-5bf2-b254-742bb8f16e14","description":"Late-afternoon traffic along East Kimberly Road near Jersey Ridge Road in Davenport in February 2015.","byline":"John Schultz, QUAD-CITY TIMES FILE PHOTO","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":1726,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/1c/c1cf9c4d-4297-5bf2-b254-742bb8f16e14/54e7c05093b83.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"356","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/1c/c1cf9c4d-4297-5bf2-b254-742bb8f16e14/59285dadd09b1.image.jpg?resize=620%2C356"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"57","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/1c/c1cf9c4d-4297-5bf2-b254-742bb8f16e14/54e7c050a21bd.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"172","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/1c/c1cf9c4d-4297-5bf2-b254-742bb8f16e14/54e7c050a2a7a.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"588","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/1c/c1cf9c4d-4297-5bf2-b254-742bb8f16e14/59285dadd09b1.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"1517b0e0-2226-543b-91b8-2430d6de8216","description":"City of Davenport.","byline":"Contributed","hireswidth":1896,"hiresheight":914,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/51/1517b0e0-2226-543b-91b8-2430d6de8216/59285dad8b260.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1896","height":"914","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/51/1517b0e0-2226-543b-91b8-2430d6de8216/59285dad896b1.image.jpg?resize=1896%2C914"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"48","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/51/1517b0e0-2226-543b-91b8-2430d6de8216/59285dad896b1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C48"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"145","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/51/1517b0e0-2226-543b-91b8-2430d6de8216/59285dad896b1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C145"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"494","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/51/1517b0e0-2226-543b-91b8-2430d6de8216/59285dad896b1.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C494"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"4bd44c44-61e1-5f62-89ce-da20da54feb8","body":"

Q. I have been trying to use the YourGov app to report potholes in the past two weeks or more. I have used it in the past with no issues. However, now, it won't let me submit a request, saying there was a problem to upload your request. I have tried through the link on the city of Davenport website with the same issue. I have tried to reinstall the app but still cannot submit a request. I have tried by being signed in and not being signed in. What is going on and does the administration of Davenport know of this problem? \u2014\u00a0Sharon

A. We contacted the city of Davenport to find out. Nicole Gleason, public works director, had the IT team review the YourGov app and found that if the requestor was leaving the 'description' field completely blank, it was giving off an error. The need for the description was eliminated, and the problem was resolved. \"Please thank Sharon for bringing this to our attention.\"

Q. Why does ESPN black out the baseball games that includes the St. Louis Cardinals? Tonight (May 17), the 7 p.m. game was to be Boston vs. St. Louis Cardinals, but it was Sports Center. This happens all the time unless the Cardinals are playing the Cubs, and ESPN is broadcasting the game.\u00a0\u2014\u00a0Rita

A. Quad-City Times sports reporter Don Doxsie said, \"Here is my understanding of the situation: Not only are Cardinals games blacked out here, but so are the Cubs, White Sox, Twins and Brewers. I believe that applies only to MLB Network and weeknight ESPN games, however. The Sunday night ESPN games go to the whole country with no blackout restrictions, which is why this reader said she recently was able to get a Cubs-Cardinals game. For more information on MLB's blackout policy, go to mlb.mlb.com/mlbtv/help-center/blackout-info.jsp.

Q. A few years ago, there was talk of East Kimberly Road being widened to six lanes. Whatever happened to this? \u2014\u00a0Tim

A. We contacted the city of Davenport public works department. We were referred to the Iowa Department of Transportation. Sam J. Shea, transportation planner, District 6, responded:

\"I think that is accurate, the Iowa DOT considered the widening of East Kimberly Road a few years ago. At that time, the city of Davenport was beginning work on their Davenport in Motion (DIM) Transportation Plan. The plan recommendation was to not widen Kimberly, so the city asked us to hold off on development of any widening project until they had some consensus of the DIM plan and the city council. Currently, this project is not in our Five-Year Program so the development remains on hold today.\"

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