[ ]
[ {"id":"fa01a5d7-5996-535b-9b21-8a733fe911c7","type":"article","starttime":"1484737428","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T05:03:48-06:00","lastupdated":"1484741730","priority":0,"sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Trump snubs ethical norms because we've forgotten why they matter","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/article_fa01a5d7-5996-535b-9b21-8a733fe911c7.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/trump-snubs-ethical-norms-because-we-ve-forgotten-why-they/article_fa01a5d7-5996-535b-9b21-8a733fe911c7.html","canonical":"http://theconversation.com/trump-snubs-ethical-norms-because-weve-forgotten-why-they-matter-71401","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Elizabeth C. Tippett, Assistant Professor, School of Law, University of Oregon","prologue":"Let\u2019s be honest. Conflicts of interest are boring.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","commentary","analysis"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"fa01a5d7-5996-535b-9b21-8a733fe911c7","body":"

Let\u2019s be honest. Conflicts of interest are boring.

The president-elect knows this. In fact, he\u2019s banking on it.

Instead of addressing his conflicts in a meaningful way at his press conference last week, Trump pointed to a stack of folders behind him. He then turned the press conference over to a lawyer, who talked about Trump\u2019s plans for long enough for viewers to lose interest. It sounded official and complicated, even though it\u2019s an embellished version of his November announcement to turn the business over to his children.

Many condemned Trump\u2019s plan to handle his myriad conflicts of interest as president as wholly inadequate, including the director of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics.

But most likely, Trump will get away with it \u2013 for now \u2013 and continue to ignore the warnings of government ethics officials, tasked with preventing things from going terribly wrong.

For decades, they\u2019ve been so successful at preventing a major government ethics scandal, Trump\u2019s conflicts of interest now seem academic and even soporific to the average voter. Unfortunately for Trump, his unwillingness to listen makes a disaster much more likely. On the upside, a scandal would at least remind Americans why ethics-based precautions matter.

Owning is knowing

Trump\u2019s plan consists of handing management of the family business to his sons, Don and Eric, and a current Trump executive. Trump pledges not to discuss business with his sons.

Trump will not be divesting his golf clubs, commercial properties, resorts, hotels or royalty rights. The plan also provides for no \u201cnew\u201d foreign deals, though new domestic deals will be permitted subject to a \u201cvetting process.\u201d Existing foreign and domestic deals will presumably continue.

Walter Shaub, who directs the Office of Government Ethics, condemned Trump\u2019s plan as \u201cmeaningless.\u201d Turning over management of the business to others \u2013 especially his own children \u2013 is not a \u201cblind trust\u201d because Trump \u201cknows what he owns.\u201d Trump\u2019s own attorney used this fact as an argument that nothing could be done about the conflict.

Shaub disagreed. If Trump divests his assets and places them in a blind trust \u2013 meant to prevent an elected official from making decisions that would benefit his or her own business interests \u2013 he won\u2019t know what he owns. The independent trustee would make decision about selling assets and which assets to buy in their place. Under the government\u2019s standard blind trust agreement, the trustee wouldn\u2019t tell the president which assets are in the trust.

Much ado about nothing?

Nevertheless, Republican Representative Jason Chaffetz called Shaub \u201chighly unethical\u201d for publicly criticizing Trump\u2019s plan.

It\u2019s certainly unusual, but, as with all things Trump, we\u2019re in uncharted waters.

For some Trump supporters, all of this ethics criticism feels alarmist and exaggerated. One explained to me that these conflicts of interests are all hypothetical and abstract. Nothing terrible has happened yet. He argued that Trump\u2019s potentially problematic behavior thus far \u2013 like his business-related inquiries of the Argentinian president or complaints to Brexit leaders about wind farms near his golf course \u2013 is small potatoes compared to other national priorities.

This reaction is understandable. It\u2019s hard to imagine a giant presidential ethics scandal because there hasn\u2019t been one since the Nixon administration. Why worry?

Anyone in the business of prevention understands this challenge. In \u201cThe Black Swan,\u201d Wharton scholar Nicholas Nassim Taleb described the most \u201cmistreated heroes\u201d as those \u201cwe do not know were heroes, who saved our lives, who helped us [by] avoid[ing] disasters.\u201d

Taleb presents the thought experiment of a hypothetical legislator who passed a law requiring that cockpit doors be locked as of Sept. 10, 2001. Yes, the legislator would have succeeded in preventing a terrorist attack. But he would also erase the proof that his legislation was valuable.

In the business of prevention, the benefits are hypothetical and the costs are real. The diseases prevented by vaccines have become so rare that they have reached the status of a hypothetical threat. Some parents now decline vaccines based on ephemeral fears because the benefits have become even more ephemeral.

William Ruckelshaus, a Republican and the first Environmental Protection Agency administrator, summed up the problem nicely:

\u201cDuring the late \u201860s, the early \u201870s \u2026 [y]ou could see the air pollution on your way to work in the morning. When I first moved to Washington, the air was brown, mostly associated with automobile emissions. We had rivers that caught on fire like the (Cuyahoga) going through Cleveland, Ohio. \u2026today it doesn\u2019t galvanize as much public demand that something be done as was true back in the 1960s. EPA is a victim of its own success. A lot of the changes in the air and the water have been a result of a pretty vigorous agency going after polluters.\u201d

Make ethics great again

Conflicts of ethics rules serve as preventative measures, as Shaub pointed out.

Blind trusts make conflicts of interest impossible because government officials both no longer have control of the assets and don\u2019t know what they are. It is impossible to be influenced by ownership of an unknown asset.

All of the presidents since the Watergate scandal have acted as though the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 applied to them, even though technically it doesn\u2019t.

In a sense, the entire Executive Branch has been vaccinated against conflicts of interest for the last 40 years. That is until now, with an incoming president who stated repeatedly during his press conference that conflict of interest rules don\u2019t apply. So maybe we\u2019re due for a scandal?

Sometimes, retrenchment can be helpful to the cause of prevention. In 2015, a measles outbreak at Disneyland led to an increase in vaccination rates. Trump\u2019s unprecedented conflicts of interest could do the same for Washington, spurring a renewed push to bind the president to higher ethical standards.

At it stands, Trump\u2019s failure to address his conflicts means that he remains exposed to the possibility of a full-blown conflicts-of-interest scandal. All it would take is for President Trump to have another conversation with British politicians about those pesky wind farms near his golf course in Scotland, this time from the Oval Office.

Yes, it would be a blow to the office of the presidency. But on the upside, it would \u2013 to borrow the president-elect\u2019s favored phrase \u2013 make ethics great again.

\"The

Elizabeth C. Tippett made a contribution to the Hillary Clinton election campaign.

"}, {"id":"f7652c51-9ce6-5b35-a7f2-d3317b37dea6","type":"article","starttime":"1484737418","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T05:03:38-06:00","lastupdated":"1484741730","priority":0,"sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"One way Trump is different from European nationalists","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/article_f7652c51-9ce6-5b35-a7f2-d3317b37dea6.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/one-way-trump-is-different-from-european-nationalists/article_f7652c51-9ce6-5b35-a7f2-d3317b37dea6.html","canonical":"http://theconversation.com/one-way-trump-is-different-from-european-nationalists-71259","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Brian Porter-Sz\u00fccs, Professor of History, University of Michigan","prologue":"When comparing Europe and America, we frequently overlook differences that hide inside similarities.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","commentary","analysis"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"f7652c51-9ce6-5b35-a7f2-d3317b37dea6","body":"

When comparing Europe and America, we frequently overlook differences that hide inside similarities.

There is no doubt that President-elect Donald Trump is surfing the same wave as European authoritarian nationalists like Russia\u2019s Vladimir Putin, Hungary\u2019s Viktor Orb\u00e1n, France\u2019s Marine Le Pen, Turkey\u2019s Recep Erdo\u011fan, Austria\u2019s Norbert Hofer or Poland\u2019s Jaros\u0142aw Kaczy\u0144ski.

The parallels are many. Yet, during this apparent moment of political convergence, the U.S. is diverging from Europe in one fundamental aspect. While Trump might resemble these European nationalists, he has tied himself to a Republican Party that is quite distinct from the parties they lead.

That may well be his undoing.

Authoritarian nationalism in Poland

Consider the case of Poland, where I am currently living and writing. Over the past year, the situation here has steadily deteriorated.

As recently as 2014, many were saying that Poland had entered a golden age, with greater wealth, stability and international prominence than ever. But in 2015, it all came crashing down with the election of the Law and Justice Party (Prawo i Sprawiedliwo\u015b\u0107, or PiS).

Since then, Poland has been censured by the European Union\u2019s Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance and transformed from the EU\u2019s exemplar of success to one of its biggest headaches. The formerly booming economy has slowed. The country\u2019s credit rating has been downgraded. And the Warsaw stock market\u2019s capitalization has declined by US$50 billion.

This authoritarian, nationalist movement is led by Jaros\u0142aw Kaczy\u0144ski. Kaczy\u0144ski rules Poland with near absolute authority even though he is technically only an ordinary member of Parliament. He has installed a president and prime minister who are loyal to him, thus making the official offices of state subordinated to the leader of the ruling party \u2013 much as it was during the communist era.

Throughout most of 2016, the government openly defied unfavorable rulings from the constitutional court, a conflict that ended only when PiS installed its own obedient chief justice. New regulations restricting the media provoked a filibuster attempt by the opposition beginning in late December. The main opposition parties occupied the parliamentary dais, but PiS responded by holding a meeting of its caucus in another room and passing the legislation it wanted. Faced with threats of arrest, the opposition abandoned their protest on Jan. 12.

The state-owned media has become an unabashed propaganda outlet, with a bias not seen since the fall of communism. For example, on Jan. 15 the main TV station aired a \u201cdocumentary\u201d arguing that the recent parliamentary protests were a failed coup attempt with the goal of overthrowing democracy in Poland on behalf of unspecified foreign interests.

According to a recent IPSOS survey, only 25 percent of Poles believe that the state-owned media is trustworthy, and nearly all of them describe themselves as PiS supporters. An independent media still exists, but companies with state contracts are being pressured to pull advertising from media that oppose Kaczy\u0144ski, and not sell opposition periodicals in their stores.

A massive and ill-planned educational \u201creform\u201d has been pushed through. The main upshot will be the firing of thousands of teachers, setting the stage for an ideological purge of the profession. That\u2019s necessary, because starting next fall students will be subjected to a new mandatory curriculum that emphasizes \u201cpatriotic education.\u201d

PiS uses the slogan \u201cDobre Zmiany,\u201d which means \u201cGood Changes,\u201d to encompass the move away from the norms of constitutional rule of law, pluralism and liberal democracy.

The same hatreds, the same promises

A comparison of the rhetoric of Kaczy\u0144ski and Trump shows that they both come from the same ideological framework.

For example, on Jan. 10, Kaczy\u0144ski was confronted with a loud protest during one of his speeches. Pointing to his opponents, he said \u201cthe day will come when Poland will once and for all free itself from all that, from the sickness that we see here. And no shouts, no screams, no sirens will change that. Poland will be victorious against its enemies, against the traitors.\u201d

Both Trump and Kaczy\u0144ski have appealed to explicit xenophobia. Both promise to return \u201cgreatness\u201d to their country, even as their isolationism and extremism distance them from former allies. Both evoke memories of a lost era of job security and prosperity for industrial workers, and claim that they can bring those good days back. Most of all, both cultivate a worldview based on an existential struggle between themselves and a mysterious, conspiratorial network of enemies.

Even the path to power for both Trump and Kaczy\u0144ski has been similar. Neither represents a majority, but both took advantage of constitutional quirks to transform extraordinarily tight electoral results into a victory.

In Poland, parties that get fewer than 5 percent of the vote get no seats in Parliament. Their votes are distributed proportionately among the larger parties. Because the left splintered into multiple parties, none of them got more than 5 percent and PiS\u2019s 38 percent of the votes translated to 51 percent of the parliamentary delegates. As in America, a couple hundred thousand Polish votes cast differently would have led to a totally different outcome. Since the elections, PiS\u2019s support has remained in the low to mid-30\u2019s. That should give us some pause before we attribute either victory to profound cultural or sociological shifts.

Despite Trump\u2019s unconcealed fondness for Russia, which is not usually an asset in Poland, the PiS government applauded his electoral victory. Kaczy\u0144ski despises Putin and was happy to welcome U.S. troops to Poland on Jan. 12, yet his ideological affinity with Trump seems to be more important.

An essential difference

Despite all these similarities, there is an essential difference between the two leaders. Kaczy\u0144ski, like his European counterparts on the far right, is genuinely hostile to capitalism.

On the European side of the Atlantic, \u201cliberalism\u201d has long been understood to encompass both free market economics and liberal constitutional democracy. PiS wants to expand the welfare state, lower the retirement age, outlaw commerce on Sundays and holidays and undertake a massive state-financed construction program.

The party\u2019s hostile relation to the business community has sent the Polish stock market and the value of the z\u0142oty to record lows. For Kaczy\u0144ski, national freedom is what matters. Individual freedoms, including economic ones, are subordinate. As a result, most Polish businesspeople stand alongside civil rights activists in common opposition to the wave of far-right victories.

The contrast with the U.S. could not be more dramatic. Trump has named oligarchs, libertarians and Ayn Rand enthusiasts like Secretary of State nominee Rex Tillerson to cabinet positions.

The ability of the Republicans to bring together business interests with antiliberal populism is an impressive bit of ideological sleight of hand. If that stew can be kept in one pot, Trump will likely remain a formidable force, able to draw upon broad populist anger and vast financial resources. But it is hard to see how Trump will hold all that together.

The base that elected him is more closely aligned to their European counterparts than to the Republican leadership. This difference is crucial. Trump and Kaczy\u0144ski are similar, but the latter is at the head of a coherent and committed movement, while the former is trying to ride two horses that won\u2019t be going in the same direction for very long.

Perhaps the economic elites of the U.S. will make a compromise akin to that made by their peers in the 1930s, when business leaders in Germany reluctantly accepted fascist centralization and state control as the cost of maintaining their wealth and power. Most of Europe\u2019s business elites today haven\u2019t yet made this bargain, perhaps because they remember the consequences of that earlier deal with the devil. The decisions of their American peers will play a vital role in determining what happens over the next few years.

\"The

Brian Porter-Sz\u00fccs is currently on a sabbatical funded by the American Council for Learned Societies, and in the past has been supported by the Fulbright Foundation and the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research.

"}, {"id":"2658e099-1540-5559-84f3-ba7648fc2adb","type":"article","starttime":"1484737414","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T05:03:34-06:00","lastupdated":"1484741730","priority":0,"sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Using electricity, not molecules, to switch cells on and off","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/article_2658e099-1540-5559-84f3-ba7648fc2adb.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/using-electricity-not-molecules-to-switch-cells-on-and-off/article_2658e099-1540-5559-84f3-ba7648fc2adb.html","canonical":"http://theconversation.com/using-electricity-not-molecules-to-switch-cells-on-and-off-71306","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Gregory Payne, Professor of Bioengineering, University of Maryland","prologue":"Will your cellphone be able to communicate with bacteria in your body? Bacteria image via www.shutterstock.com.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","commentary","analysis"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"2658e099-1540-5559-84f3-ba7648fc2adb","body":"
Will your cellphone be able to communicate with bacteria in your body? Bacteria image via www.shutterstock.com.

Microelectronics has transformed our lives. Cellphones, earbuds, pacemakers, defibrillators \u2013 all these and more rely on microelectronics\u2019 very small electronic designs and components. Microelectronics has changed the way we collect, process and transmit information.

Such devices, however, rarely provide access to our biological world; there are technical gaps. We can\u2019t simply connect our cellphones to our skin and expect to gain health information. For instance, is there an infection? What type of bacteria or virus is involved? We also can\u2019t program the cellphone to make and deliver an antibiotic, even if we knew whether the pathogen was Staph or Strep. There\u2019s a translation problem when you want the world of biology to communicate with the world of electronics.

The research we\u2019ve just published with colleagues in Nature Communications brings us one step closer to closing that communication gap. Rather than relying on the usual molecular signals, like hormones or nutrients, that control a cell\u2019s gene expression, we created a synthetic \u201cswitching\u201d system in bacterial cells that recognizes electrons instead. This new technology \u2013 a link between electrons and biology \u2013 may ultimately allow us to program our phones or other microelectronic devices to autonomously detect and treat disease.

Communicating with electrons, not molecules

One of the barriers scientists have encountered when trying to link microelectronic devices with biological systems has to do with information flow. In biology, almost all activity is made possible by the transfer of molecules like glucose, epinephrine, cholesterol and insulin signaling between cells and tissues. Infecting bacteria secrete molecular toxins and attach to our skin using molecular receptors. To treat an infection, we need to detect these molecules to identify the bacteria, discern their activities and determine how to best respond.

Microelectronic devices don\u2019t process information with molecules. A microelectronic device typically has silicon, gold, chemicals like boron or phosphorus and an energy source that provides electrons. By themselves, they\u2019re poorly suited to engage in molecular communication with living cells.

Free electrons don\u2019t exist in biological systems so there\u2019s almost no way to connect with microelectronics. There is, however, a small class of molecules that stably shuttle electrons. These are called \u201credox\u201d molecules; they can transport electrons, sort of like wire does. The difference is that in wire, the electrons can flow freely to any location within; redox molecules must undergo chemical reactions \u2013 oxidation or reduction reactions \u2013 to \u201chand off\u201d electrons.

Bacteria are engineered to respond to a redox molecule activated by an electrode by creating an electrogenetic switch. Bentley and Payne, CC BY-ND

Turning cells on and off

Capitalizing on the electronic nature of redox molecules, we genetically engineered bacteria to respond to them. We focused on redox molecules that could be \u201cprogrammed\u201d by the electrode of a microelectronic device. The device toggles the molecule\u2019s oxidation state \u2013 it\u2019s either oxidized (loses an electron) or reduced (gains an electron). The electron is supplied by a typical energy source in electronics like a battery.

We wanted our bacteria cells to turn \u201con\u201d and \u201coff\u201d due to the applied voltage \u2013 voltage that oxidized a naturally occurring redox molecule, pyocyanin.

Electrically oxidizing pyocyanin allowed us to control our engineered cells, turning them on or off so they would synthesize (or not) a fluorescent protein. We could rapidly identify what was happening in these cells because the protein emits a green hue.

In another example, we made bacteria that, when switched on, would swim from a stationary position. Bacteria normally swim in starts and stops referred to as a \u201crun\u201d or a \u201ctumble.\u201d The \u201crun\u201d ensures they move in a straight path. When they \u201ctumble,\u201d they essentially remain in a one spot. A protein called CheZ controls the \u201crun\u201d portion of bacteria\u2019s swimming activity. Our electrogenetic switch turned on the synthesis of CheZ, so that the bacteria could move forward.

Bacteria can naturally join forces as biofilms and work together. CDC/Janice Carr, CC BY

We were also able to electrically signal a community of cells to exhibit collective behavior. We made cells with switches controlling the synthesis of a signaling molecule that diffuses to neighboring cells and, in turn, causes changes in their behavior. Electric current turned on cells that, in turn, \u201cprogrammed\u201d a natural biological signaling process to alter the behavior of nearby cells. We exploited bacterial quorum sensing \u2013 a natural process where bacterial cells \u201ctalk\u201d to their neighbors and the collection of cells can behave in ways that benefit the entire community.

Perhaps even more interesting, our groups showed that we could both turn on gene expression and turn it off. By reversing the polarity on the electrode, the oxidized pyocyanin becomes reduced \u2013 its inactive form. Then, the cells that were turned on were engineered to quickly revert back to their original state. In this way, the group demonstrated the ability to cycle the electrically programmed behavior on and off, repeatedly.

Interestingly, the on and off switch enabled by pyocyanin was fairly weak. By including another redox molecule, ferricyanide, we found a way to amplify the entire system so that the gene expression was very strong, again on and off. The entire system was robust, repeatable and didn\u2019t negatively affect the cells.

Sensing and responding on a cellular level

Armed with this advance, devices could potentially electrically stimulate bacteria to make therapeutics and deliver them to a site. For example, imagine swallowing a small microelectronic capsule that could record the presence of a pathogen in your GI tract and also contain living bacterial factories that could make an antimicrobial or other therapy \u2013 all in a programmable autonomous system.

This current research ties into previous work done here at the University of Maryland where researchers had discovered ways to \u201crecord\u201d biological information, by sensing the biological environment, and based on the prevailing conditions, \u201cwrite\u201d electrons to devices. We and our colleagues \u201csent out\u201d redox molecules from electrodes, let those molecules interact with the microenvironment near the electrode and then drew them back to the electrode so they could inform the device on what they\u2019d seen. This mode of \u201cmolecular communication\u201d is somewhat analogous to sonar, where redox molecules are used instead of sound waves.

These molecular communication efforts were used to identify pathogens, monitor the \u201cstress\u201d in blood levels of individuals with schizophrenia and even determine the differences in melanin from people with red hair. For nearly a decade, the Maryland team has developed methodologies to exploit redox molecules to interrogate biology by directly writing the information to devices with electrochemistry.

Perhaps it is now time to integrate these technologies: Use molecular communication to sense biological function and transfer the information to a device. Then use the device \u2013 maybe a small capsule or perhaps even a cellphone \u2013 to program bacteria to make chemicals and other compounds that issue new directions to the biological system. It may sound fantastical, many years away from practical uses, but our team is working hard on such valuable applications\u2026stay tuned!

\"The

William Bentley receives funding from the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Agriculture, and the Department of Defense (the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, DTRA).

Gregory Payne receives funding from U.S. National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health and Department of Defense.

"}, {"id":"a41658bf-4305-50cd-b944-2d2f47487d02","type":"article","starttime":"1484737409","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T05:03:29-06:00","lastupdated":"1484741730","priority":0,"sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Why the legacy of Shakers will endure","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/article_a41658bf-4305-50cd-b944-2d2f47487d02.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/why-the-legacy-of-shakers-will-endure/article_a41658bf-4305-50cd-b944-2d2f47487d02.html","canonical":"http://theconversation.com/why-the-legacy-of-shakers-will-endure-71063","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Joanne M. Pierce, Professor of Religious Studies, College of the Holy Cross","prologue":"Sister Frances Carr, left, and Brother Arnold Hadd of the Shaker Village sing during a rehearsal on Sept. 13, 1995. AP Photo/Adam Nadel","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","commentary","analysis"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"a41658bf-4305-50cd-b944-2d2f47487d02","body":"
Sister Frances Carr, left, and Brother Arnold Hadd of the Shaker Village sing during a rehearsal on Sept. 13, 1995. AP Photo/Adam Nadel

On Monday, Jan. 2, Shaker Sister Frances Carr died at the age of 89. She had been a Shaker for almost 80 years and passed away at the Shaker community at Sabbathday Lake in Maine.

Through my own research interest in the area of Christian rituals, I have developed an interest in the Shakers and Shaker history, especially related to the \u201cEra of Manifestations\u201d in the mid-19th century. That was the period when the Shakers performed elaborately choreographed forms of ritual dance and sang sacred songs during their Sunday worship (usually open to the public).

And so it was with a pang of sorrow that I read Sister Carr\u2019s obituary. She had been a member of the community since 1937, when the Shakers (who called themselves the United Society of Believers in Christ\u2019s Second Appearing) had taken her in as a 10-year-old orphan.

According to one point of view, Carr was the last Shaker. In the mid-20th century, as the number of Shaker villages dwindled to two (Canterbury in New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake in Maine), members of the Canterbury group felt strongly that the church should be allowed to die out. They insisted that Shaker membership had been closed since 1965 and that no new members would be accepted by either remaining Shaker community.

However, the members at Sabbathday Lake stressed the autonomy of each local community. Quietly, a few younger people became associated with the Maine community in the 1960s through the 1980s. The two remaining members of this community, Arnold Hadd and June Carpenter, are listed as members today.

Regardless of which side one might take, the death of this \u201clast\u201d Shaker is at least the symbolic close of an era. At one point in time, Shakers were quite a notable element in the religious and cultural life of United States. Even today, from my perspective, Shaker insights and way of life have much to offer.

The history of Shakers

To begin with, the \u201cSociety of Believers\u201d grew steadily in the United States from 1774, the year their founder, the English visionary and preacher Mother Ann Lee, arrived in New York with a few of her followers.

At first met with some resistance and even violence, Mother Ann started public preaching, prophesies, and Spirit-inspired singing and dancing.

She insisted that Christ had already returned \u201cin glory\u201d from the dead, as he had promised in the gospels. She urged those who accepted this truth to respond by confessing their sins and then gathering together to live new lives in more perfect societies.

A Dec. 23, 1978 photo of Eldress Bertha Lindsay, left, and Gertrude Soule decorating their artificial Christmas tree at Canterbury, New Hampshire. AP Photo

Believers dissolved their marriages in order to live in communal villages, practicing strict celibacy as \u201cbrothers\u201d and \u201csisters.\u201d Those who had children allowed them to be raised by the community; they also took in orphaned and unwanted children.

They held all of their goods in common, made their own clothes, constructed and invented their own tools and architecture, and lived their days according to a specific order in work and prayer. Apart from one urban community in Philadelphia, composed largely of African-American Shaker women, Shaker villages were agricultural communities, self-sufficient for the most part, supporting themselves by selling their produce and crafts. Most notable of these were packaged seeds, a joint venture of several Shaker communities marketed as the Shaker Seed Company.

Decline of the community

For almost 100 years, Shaker communities grew and expanded in the eastern United States. In the first part of the 19th century, there were more than 20 Shaker communities housing some 6,000 members, concentrated largely in New England and New York but scattered in other states as far west as Kentucky and as far south as Florida.

However, during the second half of the 19th century, the Shaker movement began a long decline. American society was going through a period of rapid transformation, sparked both by the Civil War and the impact of the Industrial Revolution.

Against this backdrop, many elements of Shaker life seemed at best antiquated (for instance, their determined rejection of \u201cthe world\u201d) and at worst repellent (especially their insistence on mandatory celibacy). The number of aspirants wishing to join dropped and people began to leave Shaker communities. The remaining Shaker population was rapidly aging.

Slowly, Shaker village after Shaker village closed and the land was sold to local towns or private individuals. One example is the Shaker village in Shirley, Massachusetts, which was repurposed as a boys\u2019 reform school for decades (1908-1972); some of the land was then used for a new prison.

A June 8, 2015 photo of an archaeological dig at the Shaker village in Enfield, New Hampshire. AP Photo/Jim Cole

Sections of 15 others, including Sabbathday Lake, were preserved as historical sites through the National Parks Service, and are still open today for tours and workshops.

A few Shaker songs, originally used during ritual dances or prayer services, survive in folk and classical music such as composer Aaron Copland\u2019s \u201cAppalachian Spring.\u201d One, \u201cSimple Gifts,\u201d is still taught and sung in schools, churches and by professional musicians.

Today, most people use the term \u201cShaker\u201d in the same way as they would \u201cAmish,\u201d as an adjective designating a simple, \u201chand-crafted\u201d style of design in clothing or furniture, like Shaker sweaters or Shaker furniture.

Lasting legacy

But regardless of whether or not the Shakers\u2019 actual communities survive the 21st century, many believe their influence has shaped and will continue to shape American thought and culture in more than one way.

Members of the society, for example, were early proponents of gender equality , based on the fundamental teaching of Mother Ann that all believers were radically united in Christ\u2019s second coming (not without some internal struggles on how that should be best expressed after her death). Christ was already present, they believed, within each of them and among them as a community; therefore, harmony was a key element in the structuring of all Shaker communities.

Teams of both sisters and brothers served in leadership roles as Elders and Eldresses, and Mother Ann continued to be the touchstone figure for all of the communities. Narratives about Mother\u2019s life, words and actions, collected at various points during the Shaker experience, continued to highlight her venerated position as suffering woman, formidable prophet and spiritual mother.

Believers were also determined pacifists, holding that warfare was antithetical to true Christianity. Throughout the history of the United States, they refused to serve in the military and protested against conscription. During the Civil War, they were among the first groups to receive conscientious objector status or an official exemption from military service based on their religious beliefs, along with the Quakers.

Members of the society stressed a simplicity of lifestyle, expressed in a strong sense of responsibility and adaptability in their daily actions and decisions. They accepted both \u201cscience\u201d and \u201creligion\u201d as part of God\u2019s truth, and so never rejected technological advances, just the materialism that tended to come with them.

They abhorred waste. Visitors and guests at mealtimes were reminded to \u201cShaker their plate\u201d or to take what they wished but leave no uneaten food on the plate. Shaker buildings were simple but practical; furniture was plain but sturdy, and designed for convenient storage. Believers were considered to have \u201cwell ordered\u201d farms, and were efficient and \u201cscientific\u201d in their methods, not afraid to adapt their methods to differences in agriculture in different states and environments.

Why death is necessary for fullest bloom

Certainly, there are elements of the Shaker gospel and \u201charmony\u201d that simply do not carry over into the 21st century, such as the insistence on mandatory celibacy for all members or the expectation of visions from diverse spirits.

But Shakers\u2019 rejection of \u201cthe world\u201d does offer us today some insightful reflections on contemporary issues such as their pacifism when confronted by terrorism; their mutual love and respect in the face of gender and racial divisions; and their cheerful blending of prosperity and simplicity as a response to the wasteful nature of many materialistic cultures.

Like the seeds they once nurtured and sold, the Shakers were themselves seeds and catalysts in American society. And as noted in the Gospel of John, in the New Testament,

\u201cTruly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit.\u201d

Marked as it may be by sadness, perhaps their inevitable individual \u201cdeath\u201d is necessary in order to reach their fullest bloom and bear their richest fruit within the culture that survives them and cherishes their memory.

Their vision of a human society united in harmony with one another and with the natural world can offer many lessons.

\"The

Joanne M. Pierce does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond the academic appointment above.

"} ]
[ {"id":"2c69e8e1-7bdb-57c8-ab3b-ffcedc81ae04","type":"article","starttime":"1484736537","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T04:48:57-06:00","lastupdated":"1484739084","priority":0,"sections":[{"movies":"entertainment/movies"},{"world":"news/world"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Polanski to preside over French cinema awards ceremony","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/article_2c69e8e1-7bdb-57c8-ab3b-ffcedc81ae04.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/polanski-to-preside-over-french-cinema-awards-ceremony/article_2c69e8e1-7bdb-57c8-ab3b-ffcedc81ae04.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/polanski-to-preside-over-french-cinema-awards-ceremony/article_8425306b-3e79-5fb1-8f8e-2dfd2ba67bdf.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"PARIS (AP) \u2014 Filmmaker Roman Polanski will preside over this year's Cesars Awards ceremony, the French equivalent of the Oscars.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","movies","entertainment","award shows","academy awards","events"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"c7c91945-4ad2-5feb-a7f5-45ddb33ced9e","description":"FILE - In this March 20, 2015 file photo, film director Roman Polanski gestures during a debate at the Paris Book Fair in Paris. Polanski will preside over this year's Cesars Awards ceremony, the French equivalent of the Oscars. The Academy of Arts and Techniques of cinema said Wednesday Jan. 18, 2017 the 83-year-old Polanski is expected to deliver two speeches during the Feb. 24 ceremony. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere, File)","byline":"Remy de la Mauviniere","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/7c/c7c91945-4ad2-5feb-a7f5-45ddb33ced9e/587f4e7fbac2c.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/7c/c7c91945-4ad2-5feb-a7f5-45ddb33ced9e/587f4e7fbac2c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/7c/c7c91945-4ad2-5feb-a7f5-45ddb33ced9e/587f4e7fbac2c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/7c/c7c91945-4ad2-5feb-a7f5-45ddb33ced9e/587f4e7fbac2c.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"2c69e8e1-7bdb-57c8-ab3b-ffcedc81ae04","body":"

PARIS (AP) \u2014 Filmmaker Roman Polanski will preside over this year's Cesars Awards ceremony, the French equivalent of the Oscars.

The Academy of Arts and Techniques of cinema said Wednesday the 83-year-old Polanski is expected to deliver the opening and closing speeches during the Feb. 24 ceremony in Paris.

Polanski, who lives in France, won eight Cesars over the course of his career, including for best director in 2014 for his film Venus in Furs.

Alain Terzian, the president of the academy, said Polanski is an \"insatiable esthete reinventing his art and works over the years.\"

Polanski is wanted in the U.S. in a case involving sex with a minor that has been hanging over him for almost 40 years. He won the best-director Academy Award for \"The Pianist\" in 2003.

"}, {"id":"15930797-b4d3-50fb-96ac-436e54b123d4","type":"article","starttime":"1484736533","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T04:48:53-06:00","lastupdated":"1484739084","priority":0,"sections":[{"movies":"entertainment/movies"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Hong Kong actor Andy Lau injured while working in Thailand","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/article_15930797-b4d3-50fb-96ac-436e54b123d4.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/hong-kong-actor-andy-lau-injured-while-working-in-thailand/article_15930797-b4d3-50fb-96ac-436e54b123d4.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/entertainment/hong-kong-actor-andy-lau-injured-while-working-in-thailand/article_be04075a-2f8d-5126-b588-b76f727a6d26.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"HONG KONG (AP) \u2014 Hong Kong actor Andy Lau has been injured while working in Thailand.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","movies","entertainment","celebrity"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"15930797-b4d3-50fb-96ac-436e54b123d4","body":"

HONG KONG (AP) \u2014 Hong Kong actor Andy Lau has been injured while working in Thailand.

A statement from his representative said the 55-year-old actor fell off a horse and injured his pelvis on the set of a commercial Tuesday.

The statement thanked people who expressed their concern but said fans shouldn't worry. It said: \"Mr. Lau is under the sound care of a medical team and all is fine.\"

No further information about how he was injured or his current condition was disclosed.

Lau is one of the most beloved actors from Hong Kong and has won countless accolades for singing and acting.

His notable films include the blockbuster thriller \"Infernal Affairs\" and the drama \"A Simple Life.\" He recently appeared in Chinese director Zhang Yimou's period drama \"The Great Wall,\" opposite Matt Damon.

Lau is married with a 4-year-old daughter.

"}, {"id":"0380c684-de13-5a9d-9945-239f489323a7","type":"article","starttime":"1484728212","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T02:30:12-06:00","lastupdated":"1484730952","priority":0,"sections":[{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"'Birds of Opulence' author wins Gaines literary award","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/article_0380c684-de13-5a9d-9945-239f489323a7.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/birds-of-opulence-author-wins-gaines-literary-award/article_0380c684-de13-5a9d-9945-239f489323a7.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/entertainment/birds-of-opulence-author-wins-gaines-literary-award/article_7ed4628c-1c0d-56e5-aea3-8ab089ff4f63.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By CHEVEL JOHNSON\nAssociated Press","prologue":"NEW ORLEANS (AP) \u2014 When African-American writer Crystal Wilkinson of Kentucky learned she won the 2016 Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence, she said she reverted to her 12-year-old self, shrieking and squealing with glee.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","books and literature","entertainment","hobbies","recreation and leisure","lifestyle"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"0380c684-de13-5a9d-9945-239f489323a7","body":"

NEW ORLEANS (AP) \u2014 When African-American writer Crystal Wilkinson of Kentucky learned she won the 2016 Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence, she said she reverted to her 12-year-old self, shrieking and squealing with glee.

\"I am over the moon,\" Wilkinson told The Associated Press about winning the nationally acclaimed prize for \"Birds of Opulence,\" her exploration of generations of troubled women in the fictional Southern black township of Opulence.

The Gaines Award and its $10,000 prize were created by a philanthropic group, the Baton Rouge Area Foundation, to recognize outstanding work by rising African-American fiction writers. The 54-year-old winner is Appalachian writer in residence at Berea College in Kentucky and will be presented the award Thursday in Baton Rouge.

Her first novel-length work, \"Birds of Opulence\" follows several generations of women of the Goode-Brown family who are plagued by mental illness, illegitimacy and the embarrassment that ensues. As younger generations watch their mothers and grandmothers die, they fear going mad and fight to survive.

\"This gives me a huge boost at this point in my career,\" Wilkinson said. \"It gives me huge confidence to know that I can do the next one and the next one and the next one.\"

Originally from the small community of Indian Creek, Kentucky, Wilkinson earned a journalism degree from Eastern Kentucky University in 1985 before embarking on her literary career. Many of her works have garnered critical acclaim.

\"Blackberries, Blackberries,\" a collection of short stories, won the 2002 Chaffin Award for Appalachian Literature. \"Water Street,\" another short-story collection, was a finalist for the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award and the U.K.'s Orange Prize for Fiction.

\"There are lots of awards out there, but not one better fitted to me,\" Wilkinson said. \"I've loved Ernest Gaines' work so much and for years have thought of him as one of my mentors.\"

The award honors Gaines' extraordinary contributions to the literary world.

A Louisiana native, Gaines wrote the critically acclaimed novel \"The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman,\" one of four of his works that were adapted for films. His 1993 novel \"A Lesson Before Dying\" won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction.

Now 84, Gaines said he was glad that writers such as Wilkinson, who keeps themes about rural life in the forefront, have emerged.

\"You know, that's the world I write about and have always written about,\" Gaines said. \"Now, people who come around years from now will be able to reference those different lifestyles in our works. Not everyone lives in the big city.\"

When asked how he feels about having a literary award named after him, Gaines downplayed the recognition. \"I think those kinds of things should be named after you when you're dead,\" he said, laughing. \"My job is just to write. If the award gets more people to read more books, that's great too.\"

As for her future, Wilkinson said it absolutely involves more writing.

\"My sort of romantic view is that I would live in a farm house somewhere and just write. I'm sure I will continue to teach, but I also want to get the other works I'm working on out into the world,\" she said.

The award is now in its 10th year supporting emerging African-American fiction writers.

"}, {"id":"53b4873c-664d-57bc-904d-4a8c225a064e","type":"article","starttime":"1484725739","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T01:48:59-06:00","lastupdated":"1484728275","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"movies":"entertainment/movies"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Indian court acquits actor Salman Khan of using illegal arms","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/world/article_53b4873c-664d-57bc-904d-4a8c225a064e.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/world/indian-court-acquits-actor-salman-khan-of-using-illegal-arms/article_53b4873c-664d-57bc-904d-4a8c225a064e.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/indian-court-acquits-actor-salman-khan-of-using-illegal-arms/article_ea477906-a587-5635-97c5-f148224a2cec.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW DELHI (AP) \u2014 Top Bollywood star Salman Khan was acquitted Wednesday of the charge of using unlicensed arms while hunting for rare blackbucks in a wildlife preserve 18 years ago.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","movies","entertainment","legal proceedings","celebrity","animal poaching and smuggling","law and order","crime","wildlife","nature reserves","environment","environment and nature"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"1d301b54-36bc-572f-aac4-25e0b280940d","description":"FILE- In this Nov. 11, 2015 file photo, Bollywood actor Salman Khan attends a promotional event for his upcoming movie 'Prem Ratan Dhan Payo' in Mumbai, India. An Indian court has on Wednesday, Jan.18, 2017 acquitted top Bollywood star Khan of the charge of using unlicensed arms while hunting for rare blackbucks in a western India wildlife preserve 18 years ago. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool, File)","byline":"Rafiq Maqbool","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"380","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d3/1d301b54-36bc-572f-aac4-25e0b280940d/587f24196dd32.image.jpg?resize=380%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"135","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d3/1d301b54-36bc-572f-aac4-25e0b280940d/587f24196dd32.image.jpg?resize=100%2C135"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"404","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d3/1d301b54-36bc-572f-aac4-25e0b280940d/587f24196dd32.image.jpg?resize=300%2C404"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1380","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d3/1d301b54-36bc-572f-aac4-25e0b280940d/587f24196dd32.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"650b05a0-8ff5-5db3-9b66-53ed5f6fe3fc","description":"FILE- In this July 15, 2015 file photo, Indian Bollywood actor Salman Khan smiles as he attends the trailer launch of his upcoming movie 'Hero' in Mumbai, India. An Indian court has on Wednesday, Jan.18, 2017 acquitted top Bollywood star Salman Khan of the charge of using unlicensed arms while hunting for rare blackbucks in a western India wildlife preserve 18 years ago. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade, File)","byline":"Rajanish Kakade","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"345","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/50/650b05a0-8ff5-5db3-9b66-53ed5f6fe3fc/587f2419b24a9.image.jpg?resize=512%2C345"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/50/650b05a0-8ff5-5db3-9b66-53ed5f6fe3fc/587f2419b24a9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/50/650b05a0-8ff5-5db3-9b66-53ed5f6fe3fc/587f2419b24a9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"690","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/50/650b05a0-8ff5-5db3-9b66-53ed5f6fe3fc/587f2419b24a9.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"53b4873c-664d-57bc-904d-4a8c225a064e","body":"

NEW DELHI (AP) \u2014 Top Bollywood star Salman Khan was acquitted Wednesday of the charge of using unlicensed arms while hunting for rare blackbucks in a wildlife preserve 18 years ago.

The 51-year-old was present in the court in Jodhpur, a city in Rajasthan state, as Chief Judicial Magistrate Dalpat Singh Rajpurohit announced his acquittal.

The charge was dismissed for lack of evidence, his attorney Hastimal Saraswat said. If convicted, he would have faced up to seven years in prison.

The prosecution argued that the license of a revolver and a rifle allegedly used by Khan had expired in 1998.

As Khan's fans cheered his acquittal, he tweeted: \"'Thank you for all the support and good wishes.\"

The Indian court system is notoriously slow, and it often takes years and even decades for a case to go to trial.

Apart from the illegal arms case, police had filed three poaching cases against Khan during the shoot of one of his films in Jodhpur in 1998.

He was convicted by a lower court and sentenced to one and five years in prison, respectively. But the actor challenged the verdict in a higher court, which said there was no evidence to suggest that the pellets recovered from the animals were fired from Khan's gun. He is still facing trial in a third case for allegedly poaching two rare blackbucks.

Khan has starred in more than 90 Hindi-language films, but has also had brushes with the law.

In 2014, the Mumbai High Court acquitted the actor in a drunken-driving, hit-and-run case from more than a decade ago.

The judges found that prosecutors had failed to prove charges of culpable homicide, in which they accused Khan of driving while intoxicated in 2002 and running over five men sleeping on a sidewalk in Mumbai, killing one of them.

The government of Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital, has challenged his acquittal in the Supreme Court.

"}, {"id":"b9d4c748-71d3-5268-bac2-c1d34a93f08b","type":"article","starttime":"1484709407","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T21:16:47-06:00","lastupdated":"1484712282","priority":0,"sections":[{"movies":"entertainment/movies"},{"national":"news/national"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Review: In 'The Founder,' cutthroat big business, supersized","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/article_b9d4c748-71d3-5268-bac2-c1d34a93f08b.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/review-in-the-founder-cutthroat-big-business-supersized/article_b9d4c748-71d3-5268-bac2-c1d34a93f08b.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/review-in-the-founder-cutthroat-big-business-supersized/article_80f3ce29-996e-5311-a9e0-85892ccd4ac0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By JAKE COYLE\nAP Film Writer","prologue":"Ketchup, mustard, two pickles. In John Lee Hancock's \"The Founder,\" about Ray Kroc and the making of McDonald's, the ingredients for success are ruthlessly simple.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","movies","entertainment"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"e5d4870c-c387-5f44-88bb-03552e140e7e","description":"This image released by The Weinstein Company shows Michael Keaton, center, in a scene from, \"The Founder.\" (Daniel McFadden/The Weinstein Company via AP)","byline":"Daniel McFadden","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5d/e5d4870c-c387-5f44-88bb-03552e140e7e/587ed6bb5d6c5.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5d/e5d4870c-c387-5f44-88bb-03552e140e7e/587ed6bb5d6c5.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5d/e5d4870c-c387-5f44-88bb-03552e140e7e/587ed6bb5d6c5.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5d/e5d4870c-c387-5f44-88bb-03552e140e7e/587ed6bb5d6c5.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"a8cdef9c-fb0e-52ac-b6a0-4e8a768a57e3","description":"This image released by The Weinstein Company shows Michael Keaton in a scene from, \"The Founder.\" (Tina Rowden/The Weinstein Company via AP)","byline":"Tina Rowden","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/8c/a8cdef9c-fb0e-52ac-b6a0-4e8a768a57e3/587ed6bb920cf.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/8c/a8cdef9c-fb0e-52ac-b6a0-4e8a768a57e3/587ed6bb920cf.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/8c/a8cdef9c-fb0e-52ac-b6a0-4e8a768a57e3/587ed6bb920cf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/8c/a8cdef9c-fb0e-52ac-b6a0-4e8a768a57e3/587ed6bb920cf.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"608ec6a8-4c8c-5d7b-899f-f8fab94eabf0","description":"This image released by The Weinstein Company shows John Carroll Lynch, left, and Nick Offerman in a scene from, \"The Founder.\" (Daniel McFadden/The Weinstein Company via AP)","byline":"Daniel McFadden","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/08/608ec6a8-4c8c-5d7b-899f-f8fab94eabf0/587ed6bbb7d89.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/08/608ec6a8-4c8c-5d7b-899f-f8fab94eabf0/587ed6bbb7d89.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/08/608ec6a8-4c8c-5d7b-899f-f8fab94eabf0/587ed6bbb7d89.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/08/608ec6a8-4c8c-5d7b-899f-f8fab94eabf0/587ed6bbb7d89.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"161c8bef-a29e-5dce-94bd-d93e16835cec","description":"This image released by The Weinstein Company shows Michael Keaton in a scene from, \"The Founder.\" (Daniel McFadden/The Weinstein Company via AP)","byline":"Daniel McFadden","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/61/161c8bef-a29e-5dce-94bd-d93e16835cec/587ed6bbd9cf6.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/61/161c8bef-a29e-5dce-94bd-d93e16835cec/587ed6bbd9cf6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/61/161c8bef-a29e-5dce-94bd-d93e16835cec/587ed6bbd9cf6.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/61/161c8bef-a29e-5dce-94bd-d93e16835cec/587ed6bbd9cf6.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"b9d4c748-71d3-5268-bac2-c1d34a93f08b","body":"

Ketchup, mustard, two pickles. In John Lee Hancock's \"The Founder,\" about Ray Kroc and the making of McDonald's, the ingredients for success are ruthlessly simple.

When Kroc (Michael Keaton), a struggling traveling salesmen selling milkshake mixers, first beelines to San Bernardino, California, in 1954 to get a look at Dick (Nick Offerman) and Mac (John Carroll Lynch) McDonald's burger joint, he stands agog at the counter. Moments after he orders, Kroc is handed his burger and fries in a bag, but he might as well have been flame-grilled by lightning. \"But I just ordered,\" he stutters.

Kroc quickly recognizes the revolutionary power of the McDonalds' restaurant and becomes its franchise-driver and the pre-eminent proselytizer of an empire built on burgers. The arches, an invention of Dick's just like its other innovations, will spread \"from sea to shining sea,\" Kroc vows. As a gathering place for families, it will be \"the new American church, open seven days a week,\" he says.

\"It requires a certain kind of mind to see the beauty in a hamburger bun,\" wrote David Halberstam of the minds behind McDonalds in \"The Fifties.\" Of course, the genius behind McDonald's lied largely with Dick McDonald, who engineered the \"speedee service system\" of its assembly line-like kitchen, designed its layout and focused its tiny menu.

But the ironically titled \"The Founder\" is not about him. It's about Kroc, a hard-drinking, slightly shifty Illinois salesman who took the idea of the McDonalds and spread it around the world through sheer (and sometimes unscrupulous) force of will and savvy standardization. In the opening scenes, Kroc, struggling to eke out a living on the road, faithfully listens to Norman Vincent Peale's \"The Power of Positive Thinking.\" ''Persistence, determination alone are all powerful,\" Kroc absorbs.

\"The Founder\" is a quintessentially post-war American story about a self-made man largely made by others. Kroc, who died in 1984, fashioned himself as the \"big picture\" visionary to the McDonald brothers' enterprise. Though McDonald's had by 1954 already sold 21 franchises, Kroc's zeal for expansion was compulsive and it turned him into a billionaire.

The McDonald brothers quickly realize, as Dick says, that they've let a wolf in the hen house. They begin fighting over issues that in their world are of massive importance, like milkshakes. Defending his high standards, Dick warns of \"crass commercialism\" infecting the franchise, and somewhere, Ronald McDonald chokes on a Big Mac.

But Kroc outmaneuvers them and eventually takes control of the company, leaving the run-over McDonalds to stare blankly at the yellow-and-red Frankenstein they've created. \"I'm national,\" a swelling Kroc declares. \"You're local.\"

Yet if there's any tragedy in \"The Founder,\" it's not in the fate of the McDonald brothers but in Kroc's success. The film is penned by Robert D. Siegel, whose \"The Wrestler\" and \"Big Fan\" also reflected the dark underbellies of American dreams. But \"The Founder,\" like its subject, is a little mechanical and a little too timid to really take a bite out of McDonald's. It's less a full meal than a drive-thru order.

Hancock's film stays laser-focused on Kroc, and with the naturally appealing Keaton playing him, our sympathies initially slide toward him. But unease steadily creeps in, especially as Kroc, while espousing the virtues of family, callously jettisons his quietly steadfast wife (Laura Dern) for another man's (Linda Cardellini). The bad taste of day-old McNuggets begins to form in our mouths as our hero turns villain, and a successful one at that.

Keaton chomps on the role, a Willy Loman who strikes it rich. Like Bryan Cranston on \"Breaking Bad,\" we can see the wheels turning behind his eyes in his step-by-step drive for power, albeit selling a slightly healthier product than Walter White peddled.

The frightful thing about \"The Founder,\" though, is that for all Kroc's back-stabbing and double-crossing, he's right. Remorseless brutality, just like fresh buns, turns out to be a necessary ingredient in business. Would you like fries with that?

\"The Founder,\" a Weinstein Co. release, is rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of America for \"brief strong language.\" Running time: 115 minutes. Three stars out of four.

___

MPAA Definition of PG-13: Parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

___

This story has been updated to correct the spelling of Norman Vincent Peale.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

"}, {"id":"2b0a6c6c-63bb-5542-96e0-75ca2b6a7388","type":"article","starttime":"1484700416","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T18:46:56-06:00","lastupdated":"1484703119","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"music":"entertainment/music"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Adams' 'Girls of the Golden West' to premiere on Nov 21.","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/national/article_2b0a6c6c-63bb-5542-96e0-75ca2b6a7388.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/national/adams-girls-of-the-golden-west-to-premiere-on-nov/article_2b0a6c6c-63bb-5542-96e0-75ca2b6a7388.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/adams-girls-of-the-golden-west-to-premiere-on-nov/article_214121ab-93eb-5acd-b931-8322cb9fb465.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 Composer John Adams' \"Girls of the Golden West\" will be given its world premiere by the San Francisco Opera on Nov. 21.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","music","entertainment","performing arts"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"2b0a6c6c-63bb-5542-96e0-75ca2b6a7388","body":"

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) \u2014 Composer John Adams' \"Girls of the Golden West\" will be given its world premiere by the San Francisco Opera on Nov. 21.

The work, with a libretto by Peter Sellars, portrays stories of the California Gold Rush in the 1850s and stars tenor Paul Appleby, soprano Julia Bullock and mezzo-soprano J'Nai Bridges, the company said Tuesday in announcing its 2017-18 season.

Grant Gershon conducts, Sellars directs and David Gropman designs the sets in the co-production with The Dallas Opera, Nationale Opera and Ballet Amsterdam and the Venice's Teatro La Fenice.

Adams, who turns 70 on Feb, 15, previously composed \"Nixon in China,\" ''The Death of Klinghoffer\" and \"Doctor Atomic,\" which all appeared at the San Francisco Opera.

The season opens Sept. 8 with a revival of Puccini's \"Turandot\" and includes new productions of Strauss' \"Elektra\" with Christine Goerke and Stephanie Blythe as well as Massenet's \"Manon\" with Nadine Sierra and Michael Fabiano. There will be three Ring cycles in a revival of Francesca Zambello's staging of the four Wagner operas, and they will feature new projections and stage action not part of its 2011 performances in San Francisco.

"}, {"id":"0a7cc8af-ceab-5d6f-93da-b7f014f22c51","type":"article","starttime":"1484699806","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T18:36:46-06:00","lastupdated":"1484702141","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"movies":"entertainment/movies"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Film about 1960s black mathematicians tops MLK weekend","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/national/article_0a7cc8af-ceab-5d6f-93da-b7f014f22c51.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/national/film-about-s-black-mathematicians-tops-mlk-weekend/article_0a7cc8af-ceab-5d6f-93da-b7f014f22c51.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/film-about-s-black-mathematicians-tops-mlk-weekend/article_52186da8-1c37-5bd3-997c-e9a7934ec8d5.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 \"Hidden Figures,\" the uplifting film about African-American mathematicians at NASA during the 1960s space race, led the North American box office for the second straight week, selling $27.5 million in tickets over the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend, according to final studio figures Tuesday.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","movies","entertainment","mathematics","science"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"9b0df060-92a3-519e-b6ad-00c0033f1591","description":"This image released by Twentieth Century Fox shows Taraji P. Henson as Katherine Johnson, center, in a scene from \"Hidden Figures.\" (Hopper Stone/Twentieth Century Fox via AP)","byline":"Hopper Stone","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b0/9b0df060-92a3-519e-b6ad-00c0033f1591/587bb1b69f5e5.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b0/9b0df060-92a3-519e-b6ad-00c0033f1591/587bb1b69f5e5.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b0/9b0df060-92a3-519e-b6ad-00c0033f1591/587bb1b69f5e5.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b0/9b0df060-92a3-519e-b6ad-00c0033f1591/587bb1b69f5e5.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"0a7cc8af-ceab-5d6f-93da-b7f014f22c51","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 \"Hidden Figures,\" the uplifting film about African-American mathematicians at NASA during the 1960s space race, led the North American box office for the second straight week, selling $27.5 million in tickets over the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend, according to final studio figures Tuesday.

The Fox release, which stars Taraji P. Henson, Janelle Monae and Octavia Spencer, has now made $61.9 million following its two weeks of nationwide release. Holdovers dominated the four-day weekend, while a number of high-profile new wide releases struggled badly.

Ben Affleck's period crime thriller \"Live by Night\" managed a feeble $6 million, and Martin Scorsese's passion project, the Christian epic \"Silence,\" earned a mere $2.4 million. Paramount's pricey family film \"Monster Trucks,\" which cost $125 million, opened with just $14.2 million. In an unprecedented move, Paramount's corporate parent, Viacom, last year wrote off the film as a $115 million loss.

The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Monday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Tuesday by comScore:

1. \"Hidden Figures,\" 20th Century Fox, $27,506,839, 3,286 locations, $8,371 average, $61,889,939, 4 weeks.

2. \"Sing,\" Universal, $19,025,360, 3,693 locations, $5,152 average, $238,240,880, 4 weeks.

3. \"La La Land,\" Lionsgate, $17,717,720, 1,848 locations, $9,588 average, $77,299,289, 6 weeks.

4. \"Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,\" Disney, $16,806,712, 3,162 locations, $5,315 average, $501,898,446, 5 weeks.

5. \"The Bye Bye Man,\" STX Entertainment, $15,204,094, 2,220 locations, $6,849 average, $15,204,094, 1 week.

6. \"Monster Trucks,\" Paramount, $14,174,039, 3,119 locations, $4,544 average, $14,174,039, 1 week.

7. \"Patriots Day,\" Lionsgate, $13,753,384, 3,120 locations, $4,408 average, $14,677,466, 4 weeks.

8. \"Sleepless,\" Open Road, $9,771,305, 1,803 locations, $5,419 average, $9,771,305, 1 week.

9. \"Underworld: Blood Wars,\" Sony, $7,263,585, 3,070 locations, $2,366 average, $25,379,703, 2 weeks.

10. \"Passengers,\" Sony, $6,491,814, 2,447 locations, $2,653 average, $90,871,545, 4 weeks.

11. \"Moana,\" Disney, $6,104,745, 1,847 locations, $3,305 average, $233,410,870, 8 weeks.

12. \"Live by Night,\" Warner Bros., $6,003,052, 2,822 locations, $2,127 average, $6,188,696, 4 weeks.

13. \"Why Him?\" 20th Century Fox, $4,175,449, 1,977 locations, $2,112 average, $56,008,496, 4 weeks.

14. \"Fences,\" Paramount, $3,513,003, 1,342 locations, $2,618 average, $46,645,365, 5 weeks.

15. \"Lion,\" The Weinstein Company, $2,772,941, 575 locations, $4,823 average, $13,815,545, 8 weeks.

16. \"Silence,\" Paramount, $2,374,886, 747 locations, $3,179 average, $3,456,650, 4 weeks.

17. \"Manchester by the Sea,\" Roadside Attractions, $2,054,178, 726 locations, $2,829 average, $37,215,956, 9 weeks.

18. \"Assassin's Creed,\" 20th Century Fox, $1,658,469, 968 locations, $1,713 average, $53,162,110, 4 weeks.

19. \"Moonlight,\" A24, $1,363,803, 582 locations, $2,343 average, $14,862,562, 13 weeks.

20. \"Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them,\" Warner Bros., $1,201,902, 502 locations, $2,394 average, $231,073,227, 9 weeks.

___

Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.

"}, {"id":"64818ce5-4e4f-5834-b85e-127b143a67f3","type":"article","starttime":"1484699700","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T18:35:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1484702243","priority":0,"sections":[{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"national":"news/national"},{"music":"entertainment/music"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Hip-hop podcast host charged in fatal concert venue shooting","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/article_64818ce5-4e4f-5834-b85e-127b143a67f3.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/hip-hop-podcast-host-charged-in-fatal-concert-venue-shooting/article_64818ce5-4e4f-5834-b85e-127b143a67f3.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/entertainment/hip-hop-podcast-host-charged-in-fatal-concert-venue-shooting/article_96674b00-bdd6-5673-8f02-30336500cec9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By LARRY NEUMEISTER\nAssociated Press","prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 A hip-hop podcast host arrested in connection with a concert venue shooting that left a rapper's bodyguard dead and three other people wounded is a killer and a danger to the community unworthy of bail, a prosecutor said on Tuesday.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","music","entertainment","violent crime","arrests","podcasting","crime","law and order","celebrity","online media","media","legal proceedings","violence","social issues","social affairs"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":10,"commentID":"64818ce5-4e4f-5834-b85e-127b143a67f3","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 A hip-hop podcast host arrested in connection with a concert venue shooting that left a rapper's bodyguard dead and three other people wounded is a killer and a danger to the community unworthy of bail, a prosecutor said on Tuesday.

Daryl Campbell, also known as Taxstone, was arrested Monday on a federal weapons possession charge stemming from the May shooting at Irving Plaza in Manhattan just before rapper T.I. was to perform.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Hagan Scotten urged Magistrate Judge Andrew Peck to deny Campbell bail, saying evidence was overwhelming that he fired the fatal shot that killed Ronald McPhatter, a bodyguard for Brooklyn rapper Roland Collins, who performs as Troy Ave.

The judge, saying he was \"taking a chance,\" granted $500,000 bail but required electronic monitoring. Campbell, who must post $350,000 in cash or property and identify five people to pledge to support the bail, was not immediately released.

Outside court, defense attorney Kenneth Montgomery said the claim Campbell fired the fatal shot was \"not the truth.\" He called Campbell a \"smart, well-balanced person.\"

In court, Montgomery said someone else was seen on video firing the gun and the gun was recovered from that person's vehicle with two other weapons.

Collins' bodyguard was killed by a gunshot fired at his chest at close range, authorities said. Collins and two bystanders were injured.

Scotten, the prosecutor, argued that DNA likely to belong to Campbell was found on the trigger, hand grip and magazine of a 9mm semi-automatic handgun used in the shooting. A criminal complaint said DNA belonging to Collins and McPhatter also was found on the gun.

Campbell, host of the popular podcast Tax Season, was feuding with Collins at the time, authorities said.

Surveillance video shows that when the men emerged from a room after the shooting, Collins, who had been shot in the legs, held the handgun, aimed it in the direction in which Campbell fled and fired a shot, according to a criminal complaint.

Collins previously pleaded not guilty to an attempted-murder charge. His attorney said he didn't shoot McPhatter.

Scotten said there was concern for the safety of witnesses in the case, and he noted that many potential witnesses were unwilling to speak with law enforcement officers. He also said Campbell had been arrested 20 times, with two felony convictions, and court papers claimed Campbell had publicly stated his membership in the Bloods street gang and his willingness to use violence and firearms.

Montgomery said his client was \"no angel\" but had left his criminal history from many years ago behind and \"walked down the path of redemption\" with his podcast and interviews.

"}, {"id":"e1409a26-7ede-5ac6-bbbc-10f73a28c500","type":"article","starttime":"1484697559","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T17:59:19-06:00","lastupdated":"1484699563","priority":0,"sections":[{"music":"entertainment/music"},{"national":"news/national"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"The Latest: Prosecutor calls hip-hop podcast host a killer","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/music/article_e1409a26-7ede-5ac6-bbbc-10f73a28c500.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/music/the-latest-prosecutor-calls-hip-hop-podcast-host-a-killer/article_e1409a26-7ede-5ac6-bbbc-10f73a28c500.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/the-latest-prosecutor-calls-hip-hop-podcast-host-a-killer/article_3f9cb7df-4e39-5fa0-a36f-14b90a83bdb0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 The Latest on the arrest of a hip-hop podcast host in connection with the fatal shooting of a rapper's bodyguard (all times local):","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","music","entertainment","violent crime","arrests","crime","legal proceedings","podcasting","law and order","celebrity","online media","media"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"e1409a26-7ede-5ac6-bbbc-10f73a28c500","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 The Latest on the arrest of a hip-hop podcast host in connection with the fatal shooting of a rapper's bodyguard (all times local):

6:55 p.m.

A prosecutor says a hip-hop podcast host arrested in connection with a New York City concert venue shooting that left a rapper's bodyguard dead is a killer and a danger to the community unworthy of bail.

Daryl Campbell was arrested Monday on a federal weapons possession charge stemming from the May shooting at Irving Plaza in Manhattan just before rapper T.I. was to perform. Campbell is known as Taxstone.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Hagan Scotten on Tuesday urged a judge to deny him bail, saying evidence he fired the shot that killed a bodyguard for rapper Troy Ave is overwhelming.

The judge granted $500,000 bail but required electronic monitoring. Campbell must post $350,000 in cash or property and identify five people to pledge to support the bail.

Defense attorney Kenneth Montgomery says the claim Campbell fired the fatal shot is \"not the truth.\" He calls his client a \"smart, well-balanced person.\"

___

8 a.m.

A hip-hop podcast host has been arrested in connection with a shooting at a popular New York City concert venue last year that left a rapper's bodyguard dead and two people wounded.

Thirty-one-year-old Daryl Campbell, also known as Taxstone, was charged Monday on a federal weapons possession charge tied to the May 2016 shooting at Irving Plaza in Manhattan just before the rapper T.I. was to perform.

A federal complaint states that DNA supposedly belonging to Campbell was found on the trigger, hand grip and magazine of a 9 mm semi-automatic handgun used in the shooting.

Brooklyn rapper Troy Ave, also known as Roland Collins, was wounded, along with a friend. Collins' bodyguard was fatally shot.

Campbell, host of the popular podcast Tax Season, was said to be feuding with Collins at the time.

Phone and email messages left for an attorney believed to be representing Campbell were not immediately returned early Tuesday.

"}, {"id":"3a68cfda-dde7-55b7-8d15-c321eef4aade","type":"article","starttime":"1484696493","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T17:41:33-06:00","lastupdated":"1484699564","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"music":"entertainment/music"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Lin-Manuel Miranda to play 'Hamilton' for Oscar Lopez Rivera","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/national/article_3a68cfda-dde7-55b7-8d15-c321eef4aade.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/national/lin-manuel-miranda-to-play-hamilton-for-oscar-lopez-rivera/article_3a68cfda-dde7-55b7-8d15-c321eef4aade.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/lin-manuel-miranda-to-play-hamilton-for-oscar-lopez-rivera/article_0c3ed3a5-4ab2-5fdb-a964-3f354cdb9fe0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"CHICAGO (AP) \u2014 \"Hamilton\" creator Lin-Manuel Miranda says he will play Alexander Hamilton at a Chicago performance in honor of the commutation of Oscar Lopez Rivera's sentence by President Obama.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","music","entertainment","pardons and commutations","political scandals","law and order","celebrity","political issues","government and politics"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":6,"commentID":"3a68cfda-dde7-55b7-8d15-c321eef4aade","body":"

CHICAGO (AP) \u2014 \"Hamilton\" creator Lin-Manuel Miranda says he will play Alexander Hamilton at a Chicago performance in honor of the commutation of Oscar Lopez Rivera's sentence by President Obama.

Lopez Rivera, who grew up in Chicago, was convicted of seditious conspiracy to overthrow the U.S. government in 1981 while leading the Puerto Rican independence group FALN. The group bombed buildings in the 1970s. With Obama's action Tuesday, he is slated to be released May 17.

The Chicago Tribune reports (http://trib.in/2jlrZtb) Miranda said he was \"sobbing with gratitude\" for the reduction of Lopez Rivera's 55-year sentence.

Miranda, who is of Puerto Rican descent, tweeted he \"wished he was with every Puerto Rican in Chicago right now.\"

Miranda last played the title role in New York In July 2016. \"Hamilton\" opened in October in Chicago, led by Miguel Cervantes.

___

Information from: Chicago Tribune, http://www.chicagotribune.com

"}, {"id":"adece95a-2484-5196-ae7d-bd7695dcbadf","type":"article","starttime":"1484690247","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T15:57:27-06:00","lastupdated":"1484693396","priority":0,"sections":[{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"sports":"sports"},{"professional":"sports/baseball/professional"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"A-Rod takes swing at new TV show for cash-strapped jocks","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/article_adece95a-2484-5196-ae7d-bd7695dcbadf.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/a-rod-takes-swing-at-new-tv-show-for-cash/article_adece95a-2484-5196-ae7d-bd7695dcbadf.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/entertainment/a-rod-takes-swing-at-new-tv-show-for-cash/article_c9499606-6ca0-5b7f-9b35-1e55e2d7a8a2.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Alex Rodriguez is no stranger to big money. Now the former New York Yankees slugger will host a new CNBC show in which he guides financially distressed athletes.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","sports","television programs","entertainment","professional baseball","sports industry","media and entertainment industry","business","sports business","baseball","men's sports"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"adece95a-2484-5196-ae7d-bd7695dcbadf","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Alex Rodriguez is no stranger to big money. Now the former New York Yankees slugger will host a new CNBC show in which he guides financially distressed athletes.

The network said Tuesday it ordered a pilot. The show's working title is \"Back in the Game.\"

Rodriquez and other mentors will assist one cash-strapped ex-athlete looking to land a job or build a business.

Former NFL star Michael Strahan is among the executive producers. The program is to be produced by SMAC Entertainment and Machete Productions.

Rodriguez was suspended for the 2014 season following an investigation of his use of banned performance-enhancing drugs. He was released by the New York Yankees last August with more than a season left on his $325 million, 10-year contract. He worked as a TV commentator this past postseason.

"}, {"id":"b995bf32-81ac-5324-a6fc-d706991cd036","type":"article","starttime":"1484689326","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T15:42:06-06:00","lastupdated":"1484693398","priority":0,"sections":[{"music":"entertainment/music"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Police: Man posed as Bieber online to extort nude photos","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/music/article_b995bf32-81ac-5324-a6fc-d706991cd036.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/music/police-man-posed-as-bieber-online-to-extort-nude-photos/article_b995bf32-81ac-5324-a6fc-d706991cd036.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/entertainment/police-man-posed-as-bieber-online-to-extort-nude-photos/article_49256e11-4f5f-52ef-84e7-39d499933fda.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"LOS ANGELES (AP) \u2014 A Massachusetts man was arrested on suspicion of soliciting nude photos from a 9-year-old California girl while posing online as Justin Bieber, authorities said Tuesday.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","music","entertainment","arrests","celebrity","crime","extortion and threats","law and order","social media","crimes against children","online media","media"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"10eb4afa-7282-5db8-a74e-21939451191a","description":"This undated booking photo provided by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department shows Bryan Asrary, who was arrested on suspicion of soliciting nude photos from a 9-year-old California girl while posing online as Justin Bieber. Asrary was taken into custody Dec. 18, 2016, near Boston and could face local charges including possession of child pornography, Los Angeles County sheriff's officials said. Asrary could also face multiple charges in California, officials said. (Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department via AP)","byline":"HOGP","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"461","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/0e/10eb4afa-7282-5db8-a74e-21939451191a/587e94ae2124a.image.jpg?resize=512%2C461"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"90","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/0e/10eb4afa-7282-5db8-a74e-21939451191a/587e94ae2124a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C90"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"270","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/0e/10eb4afa-7282-5db8-a74e-21939451191a/587e94ae2124a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C270"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"922","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/0e/10eb4afa-7282-5db8-a74e-21939451191a/587e94ae2124a.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":11,"commentID":"b995bf32-81ac-5324-a6fc-d706991cd036","body":"

LOS ANGELES (AP) \u2014 A Massachusetts man was arrested on suspicion of soliciting nude photos from a 9-year-old California girl while posing online as Justin Bieber, authorities said Tuesday.

Bryan Asrary was taken into custody Dec. 18 near Boston and could face local charges including possession of child pornography, Los Angeles County sheriff's officials said. Asrary could also face multiple charges in California, officials said.

The victim is now 11. She told investigators she was viewing Bieber's Instagram page when she received a message from another user who said he knew the pop star and could arrange a text meeting.

\"Excited at the proposition to text with Justin Bieber, the young victim accepted the offer and was directed to set up an account on the social media site KIK,\" the department said in a news release.

Asrary, 24, then posed as Bieber on KIK and demanded nude photos from the girl and threatened harm if she did not cooperate, officials said.

Believing him to be Bieber, the victim sent nude selfies and videos and then deleted the texts.

In 2016 Asrary contacted the victim again twice and threatened to put the previous photos online if she did not send more, authorities said. The victim told her mother, who contacted police.

Detectives served several search warrants for information from social media sites and were able to identify the suspect as Asrary, of Revere, Massachusetts, according to the statement.

During an interview the suspect confessed to extorting the victim for sexual images and videos and also implicated himself in similar crimes against other young girls throughout the country, officials said.

Police said they found the images on Asrary's cellphone and computer. His bail was set at $20,000.

A message left at a possible number for Asrary was not returned Tuesday.

In addition to the local charges, Asrary could face multiple charges in California, including extortion, manufacturing child pornography and communicating with a minor with the intent to commit a sex act, authorities said.

Investigators concluded Asrary had no actual connection to Bieber, \"but simply fabricated the relationship to influence his young victims,\" the department said.

"}, {"id":"29103193-7dea-512b-a41b-6eda0c30b2a2","type":"article","starttime":"1484687293","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T15:08:13-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Andy Cohen's near-clash: Joan Rivers, Maksim Chmerkovskiy","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/article_29103193-7dea-512b-a41b-6eda0c30b2a2.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/andy-cohen-s-near-clash-joan-rivers-maksim-chmerkovskiy/article_29103193-7dea-512b-a41b-6eda0c30b2a2.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/entertainment/andy-cohen-s-near-clash-joan-rivers-maksim-chmerkovskiy/article_9da80842-8179-5016-8ebc-2791a2664a48.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"PASADENA, Calif. (AP) \u2014 Andy Cohen revels in his free-wheeling talk show, but Joan Rivers' last appearance on his Bravo series almost led to a clash with another guest.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","television programs","entertainment"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"d0386d9e-f119-54b6-b40a-ffcc1c147c83","description":"FILE - This May 16, 2016 file photo shows Andy Cohen at the NBCUniversal 2016 Upfront Presentation in New York. Cohen appeared at the 2017 Winter Television Critics Association press tour on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, in Pasadena, Calif., and answered questions about his Bravo TV talk show, \"Watch What Happens Live.\" (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)","byline":"Evan Agostini","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"421","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/03/d0386d9e-f119-54b6-b40a-ffcc1c147c83/587e91a631c33.image.jpg?resize=421%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"122","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/03/d0386d9e-f119-54b6-b40a-ffcc1c147c83/587e91a631c33.image.jpg?resize=100%2C122"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"365","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/03/d0386d9e-f119-54b6-b40a-ffcc1c147c83/587e91a631c33.image.jpg?resize=300%2C365"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1245","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/03/d0386d9e-f119-54b6-b40a-ffcc1c147c83/587e91a631c33.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"29103193-7dea-512b-a41b-6eda0c30b2a2","body":"

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) \u2014 Andy Cohen revels in his free-wheeling talk show, but Joan Rivers' last appearance on his Bravo series almost led to a clash with another guest.

About six weeks before her death, Rivers and Maksim Chmerkovskiy of \"Dancing with the Stars\" were to appear together on \"Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen,\" the host told a TV critics' meeting Tuesday.

But Rivers told Cohen that, after meeting with Chmerkovskiy before going on air, she made it clear that \"it wouldn't be fun for her,\" Cohen said, without elaborating.

Despite her reservations, the Ukrainian-born dancer \"turned it around\" with Rivers, he said. The guests found common ground discussing Israel, series executive producer Deirdre Connolly said.

The 81-year-old comedian died in September 2014, days after she stopped breathing during a routine medical procedure.

Asked to recall the toughest question he's asked on his show, Cohen said it was his query to Selena Gomez about Justin Bieber, with whom she'd been linked romantically. \"I don't think she loved it,\" he said.

"}, {"id":"5615a6dc-6244-5a85-a196-b629827a0175","type":"article","starttime":"1484685985","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T14:46:25-06:00","lastupdated":"1484688635","priority":0,"sections":[{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"music":"entertainment/music"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Chicago, LA, Hamburg join in John Neumeier's 'Orphee'","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/article_5615a6dc-6244-5a85-a196-b629827a0175.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/chicago-la-hamburg-join-in-john-neumeier-s-orphee/article_5615a6dc-6244-5a85-a196-b629827a0175.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/entertainment/chicago-la-hamburg-join-in-john-neumeier-s-orphee/article_5e186e1b-e0ba-50cf-86f4-f52fa06c318b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 The Lyric Opera of Chicago, LA Opera and Germany's Staatsoper Hamburg are collaborating with the Joffrey Ballet for the first time on a new production of Gluck's \"Orphee et Eurydice\" by choreographer John Neumeier.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","celebrity","performing arts","entertainment","music"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"5615a6dc-6244-5a85-a196-b629827a0175","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 The Lyric Opera of Chicago, LA Opera and Germany's Staatsoper Hamburg are collaborating with the Joffrey Ballet for the first time on a new production of Gluck's \"Orphee et Eurydice\" by choreographer John Neumeier.

The companies said Tuesday that Neumeier, a Milwaukee native who works mostly in Europe, will direct, design and choreograph the staging, which will open Chicago's 2017-18 season and run from Sept. 23-Oct. 15. It will be seen in Los Angeles from March 10-25, 2018, and in Hamburg from Feb. 3-19, 2019.

Harry Bicket will conduct tenor Dmitry Korchak and soprano Andriana Chuchman in Chicago, and music director James Conlon will lead tenor Maxim Mironov and soprano Lisette Oropesa in Los Angeles.

The 1774 Paris version will be used that includes the ballet music \"Dance of the Furies\" and \"Dance of the Blessed Spirits.\"

"}, {"id":"39d64518-1dfa-54b5-a41d-4deb5cc29a75","type":"article","starttime":"1484683200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T14:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1484739430","sections":[{"dining":"entertainment/dining"},{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"5 foodie things to do this month","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/dining/article_39d64518-1dfa-54b5-a41d-4deb5cc29a75.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/dining/foodie-things-to-do-this-month/article_39d64518-1dfa-54b5-a41d-4deb5cc29a75.html","canonical":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/dining/foodie-things-to-do-this-month/article_39d64518-1dfa-54b5-a41d-4deb5cc29a75.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Amanda Hancock\nahancock@qctimes.com","prologue":"1. Bread and brews\u00a0The bakery portion of Baked Beer and Bread Co., the newest sweet addition to the Village of East Davenport's eatery scene, opened in December. A brewery, bar and restaurant will soon fill in the space at 1113 Mound St., Davenport. Before work is complete, Baked is getting into the booze groove with two tasting events slated for later this month. First up: sample beers from Backpocket Brewing of Coralville, Iowa, at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20. Next on the list is a sneak peek of Baked's wine list: Check out the restaurant's progress, sample\u00a0hors d'vours and wine from Johnson Bros. starting at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27. For more information, visit\u00a0bakedbeerandbreadco.com or call\u00a0563-232-1251.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["davenport","rme","mississippi valley fairgrounds' new fair center","steve grismore quartet","blind kitchen","chili cook-off","johnson bros.","baked beer and bread co.","village of east davenport","river music experience","winter wine experience","hand-in-hand","greatest grains","faithful pilot","leclaire","cook-off","food industry","gastronomy","enology","wine","restaurant","food","competition","experience","beer"],"internalKeywords":["#free"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"ce9c0c58-29ef-5a26-b3aa-7dd8aa4dccaf","description":"The bakery portion of Baked Beer & Bread Co. opened in December with a brewery, bar and restaurant to follow.\u00a0","byline":"Jeff Cook, QUAD-CITY TIMES FILE PHOTO","hireswidth":1782,"hiresheight":1163,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e9/ce9c0c58-29ef-5a26-b3aa-7dd8aa4dccaf/587dac571f2c6.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1782","height":"1163","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e9/ce9c0c58-29ef-5a26-b3aa-7dd8aa4dccaf/587dac571e059.image.jpg?resize=1782%2C1163"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e9/ce9c0c58-29ef-5a26-b3aa-7dd8aa4dccaf/587dac571e059.image.jpg?resize=100%2C65"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"196","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e9/ce9c0c58-29ef-5a26-b3aa-7dd8aa4dccaf/587dac571e059.image.jpg?resize=300%2C196"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"668","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e9/ce9c0c58-29ef-5a26-b3aa-7dd8aa4dccaf/587dac571e059.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C668"}}},{"id":"ab48b94f-9b8c-5e39-ac31-5ce7fd835bfa","description":"The Faithful Pilot, in downtown LeClaire, Iowa, is hosting a \"Blind Kitchen\" competition at 8 p.m. Thursday.","byline":"CONTRIBUTED PHOTO","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"720","height":"798","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/b4/ab48b94f-9b8c-5e39-ac31-5ce7fd835bfa/587dac56da6ef.image.jpg?resize=720%2C798"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"111","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/b4/ab48b94f-9b8c-5e39-ac31-5ce7fd835bfa/587dac56da6ef.image.jpg?resize=100%2C111"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"333","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/b4/ab48b94f-9b8c-5e39-ac31-5ce7fd835bfa/587dac56da6ef.image.jpg?resize=300%2C333"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1135","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/b4/ab48b94f-9b8c-5e39-ac31-5ce7fd835bfa/587dac56da6ef.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"f032d1eb-9e3e-53da-b735-4a1af2f1b4ba","description":"Treats will be available at tasting events at Baked Beer and Bread Co., in the Village of East Davenport, this month.\u00a0","byline":"CONTRIBUTED PHOTO","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"960","height":"803","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/03/f032d1eb-9e3e-53da-b735-4a1af2f1b4ba/587dac578a480.image.jpg?resize=960%2C803"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"84","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/03/f032d1eb-9e3e-53da-b735-4a1af2f1b4ba/587dac578a480.image.jpg?resize=100%2C84"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"251","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/03/f032d1eb-9e3e-53da-b735-4a1af2f1b4ba/587dac578a480.image.jpg?resize=300%2C251"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"857","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/03/f032d1eb-9e3e-53da-b735-4a1af2f1b4ba/587dac578a480.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"39d64518-1dfa-54b5-a41d-4deb5cc29a75","body":"

1. Bread and brews\u00a0

The bakery portion of Baked Beer and Bread Co., the newest sweet addition to the Village of East Davenport's eatery scene, opened in December. A brewery, bar and restaurant will soon fill in the space at 1113 Mound St., Davenport. Before work is complete, Baked is getting into the booze groove with two tasting events slated for later this month. First up: sample beers from Backpocket Brewing of Coralville, Iowa, at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20. Next on the list is a sneak peek of Baked's wine list: Check out the restaurant's progress, sample\u00a0hors d'vours and wine from Johnson Bros. starting at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27. For more information, visit\u00a0bakedbeerandbreadco.com or call\u00a0563-232-1251.

2. Winter Wine Experience

How about a night of wine and jazz music? Check out the eighth annual Winter Wine Experience, a wine-infused fundraiser that helps fund music and educational programming at the River Music Experience, or RME. Wine tastings, hors d\u2019oeuvres, a 50/50 raffle, silent auction and live jazz music from the Steve Grismore Quartet are on tap at 6 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, on the second floor of the RME, 129 N. Main St., Davenport. Tickets are $30 for RME members, $35 in advance and $40 day of. To purchase tickets or for more information, visit rivermusicexperience.org.

3. Chili cook-off

Mark your foodie calendar for a full day of heated chili competition. The Hand-in-Hand Chili Cook-Off is back from 2:30-7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, at the Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds' New Fair Center, 2815 Locust St., Davenport. At the eighth annual cook-off, taste a variety of chili samples\u00a0from more than 20 teams and stop by a wine and craft beer pull. Plus, there will be a \"Kids' Zone\" with bounce houses and face painting, a silent auction and raffles. Tickets: $15 for adults, $5 for kids ages 6-12, free for kids under 6. Proceeds go toward Hand-in-Hand, a\u00a0Quad-City based nonprofit that creates fun, inclusive learning experiences for children\u00a0and young adults with special needs.\u00a0

4. Soup cooking class

No shocker here: January is National Soup Month. If you've been craving a warm and cozy cup, but not an out-of-the-can concoction, stop by Greatest Grains this weekend. The natural grocery store is hosting a \"Soup\u2019s On\" cooking class, where you'll learn the basics of preparing homemade soup just in time for winter. Four soups, including vegetarian and meat-based options, will be made and sampled. The class is slated for 2 p.m. Sunday at Greatest Grains, 1600 N. Harrison St., Davenport. Tickets, $15, are available at\u00a0greatestgrains.com.

5. 'Blind Kitchen' at Faithful Pilot

Think of it as the TV show \"Top Chef.\" But in real life. The Faithful Pilot, a fine dining spot in downtown LeClaire, Iowa, is hosting a competition called \"Blind Kitchen\" in which two chefs have an hour to go head to head and create a dish with three surprise ingredients. The contest starts at 8 p.m. Thursday at The Faithful Pilot, 117 N. Cody Road, LeClaire. For more information, visit\u00a0faithfulpilot.com.

"} ]
[ {"id":"2d94c2b3-7d82-501a-944c-f7937301e35a","type":"article","starttime":"1484694000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T17:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1484720304","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Higher Risk of Heart Disease for Blacks in Poorer Neighborhoods","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_2d94c2b3-7d82-501a-944c-f7937301e35a.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/higher-risk-of-heart-disease-for-blacks-in-poorer-neighborhoods/article_2d94c2b3-7d82-501a-944c-f7937301e35a.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/higher-risk-of-heart-disease-for-blacks-in-poorer-neighborhoods/article_319a4bd0-1806-5600-8d83-4b001737d645.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans who live in poor neighborhoods are at higher risk for heart disease and stroke than those who live in wealthier areas, a new study finds.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","heart / stroke-related: misc.","race"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"2d94c2b3-7d82-501a-944c-f7937301e35a","body":"

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans who live in poor neighborhoods are at higher risk for heart disease and stroke than those who live in wealthier areas, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data collected from black men and women in Jackson, Miss., who participated in a government-funded study between 2000 and 2011. They also reviewed information collected in the 2000 U.S. Census.

Every decrease on a scale of socioeconomic status was associated with a 25 percent rise in heart disease risk, the researchers found.

When the researchers assessed violence and disorder levels in neighborhoods, there was a similar increase in risk of heart disease for each negative step on the scale. But, the research didn't prove neighborhood conditions caused poor health.

\"For decades, centuries, even, researchers have linked adverse neighborhood economic and social conditions to health,\" said study leader Sharrelle Barber.

Violence and disorder are among the issues that need to be addressed, said Barber, a research fellow at Drexel University's School of Public Health in Philadelphia.

\"These are symptoms of the broader issues of racial and economic inequality that is rampant in urban areas across the United States,\" she said in a university news release.

These issues arise from decades of concentrated poverty, she added. Particulars included limited opportunities for good jobs, proper education and other resources necessary for the individual and community well-being, Barber said.

\"One way of addressing this issue is to invest in economic and social policies at the neighborhood level -- such as creating jobs and educational opportunities -- in tandem with evidence-based efforts to reduce violence,\" Barber concluded.

The study was recently published in the American Journal of Public Health.

The ongoing Jackson Heart Study involves 5,300 black adults in Mississippi. It's the largest single-site study of heart disease in a black American population, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

More information

The U.S. Office of Minority Health has more on black Americans and health.

"}, {"id":"84aca5c1-6c31-5790-908b-f869ce2707fe","type":"article","starttime":"1484686800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T15:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1484720305","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Even a Little Daily Activity May Boost Colon Cancer Survival: Study","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_84aca5c1-6c31-5790-908b-f869ce2707fe.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/even-a-little-daily-activity-may-boost-colon-cancer-survival/article_84aca5c1-6c31-5790-908b-f869ce2707fe.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/even-a-little-daily-activity-may-boost-colon-cancer-survival/article_d7896105-e7c1-53ec-aee1-e30febacbeb9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Alan MozesHealthDay Reporter","prologue":"TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Just a half hour a day of moderate physical activity could be potent medicine for patients with advanced colon cancer, preliminary research suggests.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","cancer: colon","cancer: misc.","exercise: misc."],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"907bacc2-f4f4-5542-bea9-a6fe831c5e6a","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"800","height":"600","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/07/907bacc2-f4f4-5542-bea9-a6fe831c5e6a/587f06c04f85a.image.jpg?resize=800%2C600"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/07/907bacc2-f4f4-5542-bea9-a6fe831c5e6a/587f06c04f85a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/07/907bacc2-f4f4-5542-bea9-a6fe831c5e6a/587f06c04f85a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/07/907bacc2-f4f4-5542-bea9-a6fe831c5e6a/587f06c04f85a.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"84aca5c1-6c31-5790-908b-f869ce2707fe","body":"

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Just a half hour a day of moderate physical activity could be potent medicine for patients with advanced colon cancer, preliminary research suggests.

Study authors who tracked more than 1,200 colon cancer patients found a 19 percent decline in risk for early death among those who got 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise daily.

And, five or more hours of moderate -- but non-vigorous -- activity a week pushed that survival benefit to 25 percent, researchers said.

Walking, cleaning or gardening counted as moderate exercise, the study authors said.

Exercise benefits previously have been reported for early stage cancer patients. \"But this study extends to patients who have advanced cancer and a much more grim prognosis,\" said Dr. Andrew Chan. He's an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston.

\"And even among that population, there seems to be a benefit to physical activity,\" said Chan, who wasn't involved in the study.

What's more, a half hour of such activity daily also translated into a 16 percent drop in the progression of disease, the study authors said.

The findings held up even after accounting for a range of factors, including patient age, body weight, overall health, other serious disease, or the particular type of cancer treatment underway.

\"There is certainly increasing data to suggest that patents who have cancer and who are physically active do have a better prognosis,\" said Chan. \"This has been shown in several other studies, and with different types of cancer.\"

This study bolsters that literature, he said, and demonstrates that this appears to be the case \"even if they weren't active before their diagnosis.\"

The other thing novel with this study, Chan added, is that it looks at patients who don't consider themselves cured, unlike most other cancer-exercise studies.

The study team, led by Dr. Brendan Guercio, is scheduled to present the findings this week at the annual Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, in San Francisco. Data and conclusions presented at meetings are usually considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

The study can't actually prove that exercise improves the prognosis for late-stage colon cancer.

Still, \"while exercise is by no means a substitute for chemotherapy, patients can experience a wide range of benefits from as little as 30 minutes of exercise a day,\" Guercio said in a symposium news release. He's a resident physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

Surprisingly, the researchers noted that advanced-stage colon cancer patients only appeared to derive benefit from moderate -- not vigorous -- activity. No similar link was seen with routinely engaging in more strenuous sports or running.

Patients were surveyed about their physical activity when they began chemotherapy treatment. The researchers then determined weekly activity levels using a scientific measure known as the \"metabolic equivalent task\" (MET). MET designations reflect the amount of energy expended during physical activity.

But why didn't more strenuous activity confer similar benefits?

\"It's difficult to understand,\" said Chan. \"There's not a clear explanation biologically as to why there would be a different outcome in terms of vigorous activity, as opposed to more moderate activity. Most studies actually haven't seen that.\"

Going forward, it's important to determine if this is a true difference, he said, and if so, to try to explain it.

Guercio and his colleagues agreed that more research is needed to confirm the findings. The study was funded in part by the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

More information

There's more on exercise and cancer at the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

"}, {"id":"a357619e-ec67-5e4c-b620-c0425c8c59ab","type":"article","starttime":"1484686800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T15:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1484720305","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Working Out? Don't Bring Your Cellphone","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_a357619e-ec67-5e4c-b620-c0425c8c59ab.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/working-out-don-t-bring-your-cellphone/article_a357619e-ec67-5e4c-b620-c0425c8c59ab.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/working-out-don-t-bring-your-cellphone/article_8cff742c-3340-5219-b9a6-619c3edb334d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Talking or texting on your cell phone may spell trouble during exercise, researchers say.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","exercise: misc.","cellphones"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"05b6ec78-da3e-56cc-a4a6-7cc2f9a7409c","description":"Woman's hands hold a cell phone while texting a message.","byline":"Steven Frame","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"800","height":"600","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/5b/05b6ec78-da3e-56cc-a4a6-7cc2f9a7409c/587f06c097bb1.image.jpg?resize=800%2C600"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/5b/05b6ec78-da3e-56cc-a4a6-7cc2f9a7409c/587f06c097bb1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/5b/05b6ec78-da3e-56cc-a4a6-7cc2f9a7409c/587f06c097bb1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/5b/05b6ec78-da3e-56cc-a4a6-7cc2f9a7409c/587f06c097bb1.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"a357619e-ec67-5e4c-b620-c0425c8c59ab","body":"

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Talking or texting on your cell phone may spell trouble during exercise, researchers say.

In two studies, they found that talking or texting on a cell phone during a workout lowers the intensity of your exercise session. More importantly, the study team noted that cell phone use affects balance, which can increase the risk of injuries.

\"If you're talking or texting on your cell phone while you're putting in your daily steps, your attention is divided by the two tasks and that can disrupt your postural stability, and therefore, possibly predispose individuals to other greater inherent risks such as falls and musculoskeletal injuries,\" study author Michael Rebold, assistant professor of integrative exercise science at Hiram College in Ohio, said in a school news release.

Specifically, texting on a cell phone reduced postural stability by 45 percent. Even talking on a cell phone reduced postural stability by 19 percent.

But, if you want to pump up your workout with some tunes, go right ahead. Listening to music on a cell phone had no significant effect on postural stability during a workout, according to the study of 45 college students.

The studies about the effects of cell phone use during workouts were published in the journals Computers in Human Behavior and Performance Enhancement & Health.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute offers a guide to physical activity.

"}, {"id":"95cad331-29a9-5dee-afe6-64272a19666d","type":"article","starttime":"1484686800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T15:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1484720305","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Ticks Carrying Lyme Disease Confirmed in Eastern National Parks","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_95cad331-29a9-5dee-afe6-64272a19666d.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/ticks-carrying-lyme-disease-confirmed-in-eastern-national-parks/article_95cad331-29a9-5dee-afe6-64272a19666d.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/ticks-carrying-lyme-disease-confirmed-in-eastern-national-parks/article_d73af010-4196-58dc-ba08-d86bf6a4b1b5.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Planning a hiking trip in an eastern U.S. national park? Better pack tick repellent -- a new study found these parks are home to ticks that carry Lyme disease.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","bites & stings","lyme disease"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"a2d91634-5cbb-54f0-8276-851067a3690f","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"800","height":"600","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/2d/a2d91634-5cbb-54f0-8276-851067a3690f/587f06c0df645.image.jpg?resize=800%2C600"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/2d/a2d91634-5cbb-54f0-8276-851067a3690f/587f06c0df645.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/2d/a2d91634-5cbb-54f0-8276-851067a3690f/587f06c0df645.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/2d/a2d91634-5cbb-54f0-8276-851067a3690f/587f06c0df645.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"95cad331-29a9-5dee-afe6-64272a19666d","body":"

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Planning a hiking trip in an eastern U.S. national park? Better pack tick repellent -- a new study found these parks are home to ticks that carry Lyme disease.

Blacklegged ticks -- also known as deer ticks -- carrying Lyme disease were found in nine national parks: Acadia National Park in Maine; Catoctin Mountain Park and Monocacy National Battlefield in Maryland; Fire Island National Seashore in Long Island, N.Y.; Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania; Rock Creek Park in Washington, D.C., and Manassas National Battlefield Park, Prince William Forest Park and Shenandoah National Park in Virginia.

This is the first time researchers have confirmed that the ticks are living at the parks, although it's long been suspected that the ticks were there because of human Lyme disease infections.

\"We know Lyme disease is increasing both in numbers of infections and in geographic range in the United States,\" said researcher Tammi Johnson in a news release from the Entomological Society of America. Johnson is with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

\"This is the first large-scale survey in multiple national parks, and though suspected, it had not been previously confirmed that ticks in many of these parks were infected. It's quite likely that ticks infected with Lyme disease spirochetes are present in other parks in Lyme disease endemic areas, too,\" she explained.

Lyme disease symptoms include fever, headache and rash. Left untreated, the infection can spread to the heart, joints and nervous system, according to the CDC.

Visitors to the parks can reduce their risk of infection by following these guidelines, according to the U.S. National Park Service and the CDC:

\"The results of this study serve as a reminder that while enjoying the parks, visitors can and should take steps to help protect themselves and their loved ones from tick and other bites,\" Johnson said.

The study findings were published in the Journal of Medical Entomology.

More information

For more about Lyme disease, try the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"}, {"id":"138d0009-5df3-5ed4-afe3-9e2a2def83ec","type":"article","starttime":"1484683200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T14:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1484720306","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Hispanics, Blacks Less Likely to Get High Blood Pressure Treatment: Study","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_138d0009-5df3-5ed4-afe3-9e2a2def83ec.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/hispanics-blacks-less-likely-to-get-high-blood-pressure-treatment/article_138d0009-5df3-5ed4-afe3-9e2a2def83ec.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/hispanics-blacks-less-likely-to-get-high-blood-pressure-treatment/article_11c17a45-0817-5223-b246-7d760c60244b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Hispanic Americans are less likely than whites to get high blood pressure under control, a new study suggests.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","blood pressure","heart / stroke-related: high blood pressure","heart / stroke-related: misc.","race"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"9b35589b-5f45-536f-a336-fa10d119746f","description":"smiling african nurse checking senior patient's blood pressure","byline":"www.delightimages.com","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"800","height":"600","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b3/9b35589b-5f45-536f-a336-fa10d119746f/587f06c18e8dc.image.jpg?resize=800%2C600"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b3/9b35589b-5f45-536f-a336-fa10d119746f/587f06c18e8dc.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b3/9b35589b-5f45-536f-a336-fa10d119746f/587f06c18e8dc.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b3/9b35589b-5f45-536f-a336-fa10d119746f/587f06c18e8dc.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"138d0009-5df3-5ed4-afe3-9e2a2def83ec","body":"

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Hispanic Americans are less likely than whites to get high blood pressure under control, a new study suggests.

Researchers reviewed data from nearly 8,800 adults who took part in the 2003-2012 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

The study team found that 74 percent of white patients were getting treatment for high blood pressure. For blacks, the treatment rates were slightly lower at 71 percent. For Hispanics, the high blood pressure treatment rate was only 61 percent.

Researchers also looked at high blood pressure control rates, defined as readings below 130/80 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) for those with diabetes or chronic kidney disease, and below 140/90 mm Hg for everyone else. Control rates were 43 percent for whites, 37 percent for blacks and 31 percent for Hispanics, the study reported.

Black and Hispanics younger than 60 without health insurance were more than 40 percent less likely than whites without insurance to have their high blood pressure under control.

One bit of good news from the new research: The percentage of all adults with high blood pressure taking medications for their condition rose from 66 to 77 percent during the study period.

The study was published Jan. 17 in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

\"High blood pressure is very common, and it is strongly linked to cardiovascular diseases like stroke, heart attack and heart failure,\" said senior author Dr. Edgar Argulian. He's an assistant professor of medicine and a cardiologist at Mount Sinai St. Luke's Hospital in New York City.

\"High blood pressure is also very treatable, so from a public health perspective, it's important to know if prevention and treatment strategies are working and what differences exist across racial and ethnic groups,\" Argulian said in a journal news release.

Study lead author Dr. Sen Gu said expanded health care coverage could help minimize the differences in high blood pressure treatment. But, \"There are multiple factors that contribute to racial disparity,\" she added.

\"We need better patient education, better physician-patient communication and support for patients making lifestyle changes like exercising more and eating healthy,\" Gu said. She is an assistant professor at St. John's University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in New York City.

\"The good news is that more people are receiving treatment and getting their high blood pressure under control. At the same time, it is important to note that disparities between whites and racial and ethnic minorities persist,\" Gu said.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more on high blood pressure.

"}, {"id":"c2041784-cec2-5b70-b1a8-d9168bf8d19c","type":"article","starttime":"1484676000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T12:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1484720307","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Obamacare Repeal Could Bring Many More Uninsured, Higher Premiums","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_c2041784-cec2-5b70-b1a8-d9168bf8d19c.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/obamacare-repeal-could-bring-many-more-uninsured-higher-premiums/article_c2041784-cec2-5b70-b1a8-d9168bf8d19c.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/obamacare-repeal-could-bring-many-more-uninsured-higher-premiums/article_c304c372-72c6-5253-818e-47af42f64d1d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Repealing major parts of the Affordable Care Act could deprive 18 million Americans of insurance in the first year, a new report concludes.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","economic status","government","health costs","insurance: lack of","insurance: misc."],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"ed922457-6d5c-5ccb-a6da-861a7af22f8d","description":"Affordable Care Act / Obamacare document on a desk","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"800","height":"600","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/d9/ed922457-6d5c-5ccb-a6da-861a7af22f8d/585b7d84d0614.image.jpg?resize=800%2C600"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/d9/ed922457-6d5c-5ccb-a6da-861a7af22f8d/585b7d84d0614.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/d9/ed922457-6d5c-5ccb-a6da-861a7af22f8d/585b7d84d0614.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/d9/ed922457-6d5c-5ccb-a6da-861a7af22f8d/585b7d84d0614.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"c2041784-cec2-5b70-b1a8-d9168bf8d19c","body":"

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Repealing major parts of the Affordable Care Act could deprive 18 million Americans of insurance in the first year, a new report concludes.

That number would jump to 32 million by 2026, according to a new report from the nonpartisan U.S. Congressional Budget Office.

Moreover, insurance premiums could double over 10 years if significant provisions of the health care law were repealed, the budget office determined.

President-elect Donald Trump and other Republicans have pledged to dismantle the controversial health care law, often called Obamacare, which was passed in 2010.

While the Republican-controlled Congress passed a measure last week that sets a repeal effort into motion, a replacement plan has not yet been presented. For the new report, the budget office predicted the likely effects of a replacement act that was approved by Congress in 2015 but vetoed by President Barack Obama last year.

Under that now-defunct bill, people would not have faced tax penalties if they went without insurance. It also would have eliminated funding to expand Medicaid -- the publicly supported insurance for the poor -- and subsidies that help poor people pay for private insurance.

But insurers would still have been required to cover all applicants, at normal rates, including those with pre-existing medical conditions.

\"Eliminating the mandate penalties and the subsidies while retaining the market reforms would destabilize the nongroup market [those who buy insurance as individuals], and the effect would worsen over time,\" the report concluded, according to The New York Times.

The budget office said three changes would lead to the 10-year surge in the number of uninsured. It calculated that 23 million fewer people would be covered in the individual insurance market, and 19 million fewer people would have Medicaid coverage. An increase in people with job-based insurance would partly offset these trends.

The report comes in the wake of a weekend of protests from Americans who want the Affordable Care Act to remain intact, and just days before Trump's inauguration.

More information

HealthCare.gov outlines preventive services covered under the Affordable Care Act.

"}, {"id":"a801f7bf-797b-5315-849c-aacb9de13955","type":"article","starttime":"1484676000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T12:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1484720307","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Steep Rise in Births to U.S. Women Using Opioids","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_a801f7bf-797b-5315-849c-aacb9de13955.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/steep-rise-in-births-to-u-s-women-using-opioids/article_a801f7bf-797b-5315-849c-aacb9de13955.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/steep-rise-in-births-to-u-s-women-using-opioids/article_93498f76-ff63-56c9-bc39-103f7c8a3caf.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Over a decade, there was a nearly fivefold increase in the number of babies born each year to American women who have used opioids, a federal government report says.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","drug abuse","drug abuse: effects","drug abuse: social issues","drugs: illicit","drugs: misc.","pregnancy","pregnancy: drugs","pregnancy: risks"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"3b14287f-4178-57a6-a4ba-6a7c4e1b938e","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"800","height":"600","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/b1/3b14287f-4178-57a6-a4ba-6a7c4e1b938e/587f06c303e07.image.jpg?resize=800%2C600"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/b1/3b14287f-4178-57a6-a4ba-6a7c4e1b938e/587f06c303e07.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/b1/3b14287f-4178-57a6-a4ba-6a7c4e1b938e/587f06c303e07.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/b1/3b14287f-4178-57a6-a4ba-6a7c4e1b938e/587f06c303e07.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"a801f7bf-797b-5315-849c-aacb9de13955","body":"

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Over a decade, there was a nearly fivefold increase in the number of babies born each year to American women who have used opioids, a federal government report says.

There was also a dramatic rise in the number of infants born with a dependency on opioids, the report found. These drugs include heroin and prescription painkillers such as fentanyl, oxycodone (OxyContin) and hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin).

\"It is critical that pregnant women of all ages have access to prevention, treatment and recovery services that meet their specialized needs,\" said Kana Enomoto, from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

\"Programs that provide pregnant women with access to opioid use disorder treatment and reproductive health services can help ensure that these future mothers and their children live healthier, happier, and more productive lives,\" Enomoto said in an agency news release. SAMHSA prepared the report for U.S. Congress.

Overall, women of childbearing age who were pregnant were less likely to have used an opioid recently (1 percent) compared to non-pregnant women (3 percent), the SAMHSA study found.

Still, even that one percent figure translates to an average of about 21,000 pregnant women using opioids for \"non-medical reasons\" in the past month, the report's authors said.

Age was a major factor in opioid use during pregnancy. Younger women are significantly more likely to use opioids for non-medical reasons during pregnancy. Those 15-17 had the highest use (2.8 percent), while women between 18 and 25 had the next highest rates (1.5 percent).

In contrast, among pregnant women over 25, only 0.5 percent had used opioids for a non-medical reason in the past month, the report said.

Of the more than 21,000 women who were pregnant when admitted for substance abuse treatment in 2012, 23 percent reported heroin use, while 28 percent reported using a non-heroin opioid.

Special treatment programs for pregnant/postpartum women aren't always easy to find, the study found. In fact, according to SAMHSA, just 13 percent of outpatient-only substance abuse treatment facilities offer programs for pregnant and postpartum women. And 13 percent of residential treatment facilities have such programs, according to 2012 SAMHSA data.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse has more on opioids.

"}, {"id":"d6701cb0-7016-5dc7-8635-f37ba386f37c","type":"article","starttime":"1484676000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T12:00:00-06:00","lastupdated":"1484720307","priority":0,"sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Postpartum Depression Affects New Dads, Too","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_d6701cb0-7016-5dc7-8635-f37ba386f37c.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/postpartum-depression-affects-new-dads-too/article_d6701cb0-7016-5dc7-8635-f37ba386f37c.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/lifestyles/health-med-fit/postpartum-depression-affects-new-dads-too/article_881ee7f7-79d9-575d-8794-a4de85f6b633.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Men can also suffer from postpartum depression after their baby is born.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","depression","fatherhood","psychology / mental health: misc."],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"24ee3ae4-c94b-52ff-a21b-349dfa63be85","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"800","height":"600","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/4e/24ee3ae4-c94b-52ff-a21b-349dfa63be85/587f06c34adc6.image.jpg?resize=800%2C600"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/4e/24ee3ae4-c94b-52ff-a21b-349dfa63be85/587f06c34adc6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/4e/24ee3ae4-c94b-52ff-a21b-349dfa63be85/587f06c34adc6.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/4e/24ee3ae4-c94b-52ff-a21b-349dfa63be85/587f06c34adc6.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"d6701cb0-7016-5dc7-8635-f37ba386f37c","body":"

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Men can also suffer from postpartum depression after their baby is born.

\"Dads want to be part of the newborn experience, but often they feel like they're on the 'outside,' \" said Dr. Yaprak Harrison, a professor of psychiatry at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.

\"Moms may not always realize they're excluding dad from caring for the baby, and they may fail to realize that he wants time with the little one, too,\" said Harrison.

Research has shown that up to 1 in 10 men struggles with this psychiatric condition after childbirth, which is usually associated with new mothers, Harrison and her colleagues noted in a medical center news release.

New dads, like new moms, can experience mood-altering hormonal changes, the researchers explained.

Some of the symptoms they exhibit can be similar, too, such as extreme fatigue and changes in eating or sleep habits. But men are less likely to be weepy, so the disorder may look different in males, the researchers said.

Men with postpartum depression may need family support along with professional treatment that includes one or more of the following: psychotherapy; couples' therapy; medication; and exercises, according to the study authors.

\"Some support tips include encouraging the father to be involved with the baby and for the couple to spend time with each other,\" said Dr. Robyn Horsager-Boehrer.

\"But also, make sure he knows that postpartum depression is common and is not his fault, and that he's not alone,\" added Horsager-Boehrer, chief of obstetrics and gynecology at UT Southwestern's University Hospital.

Certain men are more likely to develop postpartum depression than others, the researchers said. They include those who've struggled with depression or have a family history of the condition; those who've faced sleep deprivation; and dads who feel distanced from their baby and the mother of their child.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health provides more on postpartum depression.

"} ]
[ {"id":"2c69e8e1-7bdb-57c8-ab3b-ffcedc81ae04","type":"article","starttime":"1484736537","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T04:48:57-06:00","lastupdated":"1484739084","priority":0,"sections":[{"movies":"entertainment/movies"},{"world":"news/world"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Polanski to preside over French cinema awards ceremony","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/article_2c69e8e1-7bdb-57c8-ab3b-ffcedc81ae04.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/polanski-to-preside-over-french-cinema-awards-ceremony/article_2c69e8e1-7bdb-57c8-ab3b-ffcedc81ae04.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/polanski-to-preside-over-french-cinema-awards-ceremony/article_8425306b-3e79-5fb1-8f8e-2dfd2ba67bdf.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"PARIS (AP) \u2014 Filmmaker Roman Polanski will preside over this year's Cesars Awards ceremony, the French equivalent of the Oscars.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","movies","entertainment","award shows","academy awards","events"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"c7c91945-4ad2-5feb-a7f5-45ddb33ced9e","description":"FILE - In this March 20, 2015 file photo, film director Roman Polanski gestures during a debate at the Paris Book Fair in Paris. Polanski will preside over this year's Cesars Awards ceremony, the French equivalent of the Oscars. The Academy of Arts and Techniques of cinema said Wednesday Jan. 18, 2017 the 83-year-old Polanski is expected to deliver two speeches during the Feb. 24 ceremony. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere, File)","byline":"Remy de la Mauviniere","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/7c/c7c91945-4ad2-5feb-a7f5-45ddb33ced9e/587f4e7fbac2c.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/7c/c7c91945-4ad2-5feb-a7f5-45ddb33ced9e/587f4e7fbac2c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/7c/c7c91945-4ad2-5feb-a7f5-45ddb33ced9e/587f4e7fbac2c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/7c/c7c91945-4ad2-5feb-a7f5-45ddb33ced9e/587f4e7fbac2c.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"2c69e8e1-7bdb-57c8-ab3b-ffcedc81ae04","body":"

PARIS (AP) \u2014 Filmmaker Roman Polanski will preside over this year's Cesars Awards ceremony, the French equivalent of the Oscars.

The Academy of Arts and Techniques of cinema said Wednesday the 83-year-old Polanski is expected to deliver the opening and closing speeches during the Feb. 24 ceremony in Paris.

Polanski, who lives in France, won eight Cesars over the course of his career, including for best director in 2014 for his film Venus in Furs.

Alain Terzian, the president of the academy, said Polanski is an \"insatiable esthete reinventing his art and works over the years.\"

Polanski is wanted in the U.S. in a case involving sex with a minor that has been hanging over him for almost 40 years. He won the best-director Academy Award for \"The Pianist\" in 2003.

"}, {"id":"15930797-b4d3-50fb-96ac-436e54b123d4","type":"article","starttime":"1484736533","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T04:48:53-06:00","lastupdated":"1484739084","priority":0,"sections":[{"movies":"entertainment/movies"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Hong Kong actor Andy Lau injured while working in Thailand","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/article_15930797-b4d3-50fb-96ac-436e54b123d4.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/hong-kong-actor-andy-lau-injured-while-working-in-thailand/article_15930797-b4d3-50fb-96ac-436e54b123d4.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/entertainment/hong-kong-actor-andy-lau-injured-while-working-in-thailand/article_be04075a-2f8d-5126-b588-b76f727a6d26.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"HONG KONG (AP) \u2014 Hong Kong actor Andy Lau has been injured while working in Thailand.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","movies","entertainment","celebrity"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":4,"commentID":"15930797-b4d3-50fb-96ac-436e54b123d4","body":"

HONG KONG (AP) \u2014 Hong Kong actor Andy Lau has been injured while working in Thailand.

A statement from his representative said the 55-year-old actor fell off a horse and injured his pelvis on the set of a commercial Tuesday.

The statement thanked people who expressed their concern but said fans shouldn't worry. It said: \"Mr. Lau is under the sound care of a medical team and all is fine.\"

No further information about how he was injured or his current condition was disclosed.

Lau is one of the most beloved actors from Hong Kong and has won countless accolades for singing and acting.

His notable films include the blockbuster thriller \"Infernal Affairs\" and the drama \"A Simple Life.\" He recently appeared in Chinese director Zhang Yimou's period drama \"The Great Wall,\" opposite Matt Damon.

Lau is married with a 4-year-old daughter.

"}, {"id":"53b4873c-664d-57bc-904d-4a8c225a064e","type":"article","starttime":"1484725739","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-18T01:48:59-06:00","lastupdated":"1484728275","priority":0,"sections":[{"world":"news/world"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"movies":"entertainment/movies"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Indian court acquits actor Salman Khan of using illegal arms","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/world/article_53b4873c-664d-57bc-904d-4a8c225a064e.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/world/indian-court-acquits-actor-salman-khan-of-using-illegal-arms/article_53b4873c-664d-57bc-904d-4a8c225a064e.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/world/indian-court-acquits-actor-salman-khan-of-using-illegal-arms/article_ea477906-a587-5635-97c5-f148224a2cec.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW DELHI (AP) \u2014 Top Bollywood star Salman Khan was acquitted Wednesday of the charge of using unlicensed arms while hunting for rare blackbucks in a wildlife preserve 18 years ago.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","movies","entertainment","legal proceedings","celebrity","animal poaching and smuggling","law and order","crime","wildlife","nature reserves","environment","environment and nature"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"1d301b54-36bc-572f-aac4-25e0b280940d","description":"FILE- In this Nov. 11, 2015 file photo, Bollywood actor Salman Khan attends a promotional event for his upcoming movie 'Prem Ratan Dhan Payo' in Mumbai, India. An Indian court has on Wednesday, Jan.18, 2017 acquitted top Bollywood star Khan of the charge of using unlicensed arms while hunting for rare blackbucks in a western India wildlife preserve 18 years ago. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool, File)","byline":"Rafiq Maqbool","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"380","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d3/1d301b54-36bc-572f-aac4-25e0b280940d/587f24196dd32.image.jpg?resize=380%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"135","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d3/1d301b54-36bc-572f-aac4-25e0b280940d/587f24196dd32.image.jpg?resize=100%2C135"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"404","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d3/1d301b54-36bc-572f-aac4-25e0b280940d/587f24196dd32.image.jpg?resize=300%2C404"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1380","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d3/1d301b54-36bc-572f-aac4-25e0b280940d/587f24196dd32.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"650b05a0-8ff5-5db3-9b66-53ed5f6fe3fc","description":"FILE- In this July 15, 2015 file photo, Indian Bollywood actor Salman Khan smiles as he attends the trailer launch of his upcoming movie 'Hero' in Mumbai, India. An Indian court has on Wednesday, Jan.18, 2017 acquitted top Bollywood star Salman Khan of the charge of using unlicensed arms while hunting for rare blackbucks in a western India wildlife preserve 18 years ago. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade, File)","byline":"Rajanish Kakade","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"345","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/50/650b05a0-8ff5-5db3-9b66-53ed5f6fe3fc/587f2419b24a9.image.jpg?resize=512%2C345"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/50/650b05a0-8ff5-5db3-9b66-53ed5f6fe3fc/587f2419b24a9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/50/650b05a0-8ff5-5db3-9b66-53ed5f6fe3fc/587f2419b24a9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"690","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/50/650b05a0-8ff5-5db3-9b66-53ed5f6fe3fc/587f2419b24a9.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"53b4873c-664d-57bc-904d-4a8c225a064e","body":"

NEW DELHI (AP) \u2014 Top Bollywood star Salman Khan was acquitted Wednesday of the charge of using unlicensed arms while hunting for rare blackbucks in a wildlife preserve 18 years ago.

The 51-year-old was present in the court in Jodhpur, a city in Rajasthan state, as Chief Judicial Magistrate Dalpat Singh Rajpurohit announced his acquittal.

The charge was dismissed for lack of evidence, his attorney Hastimal Saraswat said. If convicted, he would have faced up to seven years in prison.

The prosecution argued that the license of a revolver and a rifle allegedly used by Khan had expired in 1998.

As Khan's fans cheered his acquittal, he tweeted: \"'Thank you for all the support and good wishes.\"

The Indian court system is notoriously slow, and it often takes years and even decades for a case to go to trial.

Apart from the illegal arms case, police had filed three poaching cases against Khan during the shoot of one of his films in Jodhpur in 1998.

He was convicted by a lower court and sentenced to one and five years in prison, respectively. But the actor challenged the verdict in a higher court, which said there was no evidence to suggest that the pellets recovered from the animals were fired from Khan's gun. He is still facing trial in a third case for allegedly poaching two rare blackbucks.

Khan has starred in more than 90 Hindi-language films, but has also had brushes with the law.

In 2014, the Mumbai High Court acquitted the actor in a drunken-driving, hit-and-run case from more than a decade ago.

The judges found that prosecutors had failed to prove charges of culpable homicide, in which they accused Khan of driving while intoxicated in 2002 and running over five men sleeping on a sidewalk in Mumbai, killing one of them.

The government of Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital, has challenged his acquittal in the Supreme Court.

"}, {"id":"b9d4c748-71d3-5268-bac2-c1d34a93f08b","type":"article","starttime":"1484709407","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T21:16:47-06:00","lastupdated":"1484712282","priority":0,"sections":[{"movies":"entertainment/movies"},{"national":"news/national"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Review: In 'The Founder,' cutthroat big business, supersized","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/article_b9d4c748-71d3-5268-bac2-c1d34a93f08b.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/review-in-the-founder-cutthroat-big-business-supersized/article_b9d4c748-71d3-5268-bac2-c1d34a93f08b.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/review-in-the-founder-cutthroat-big-business-supersized/article_80f3ce29-996e-5311-a9e0-85892ccd4ac0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By JAKE COYLE\nAP Film Writer","prologue":"Ketchup, mustard, two pickles. In John Lee Hancock's \"The Founder,\" about Ray Kroc and the making of McDonald's, the ingredients for success are ruthlessly simple.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","movies","entertainment"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"e5d4870c-c387-5f44-88bb-03552e140e7e","description":"This image released by The Weinstein Company shows Michael Keaton, center, in a scene from, \"The Founder.\" (Daniel McFadden/The Weinstein Company via AP)","byline":"Daniel McFadden","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5d/e5d4870c-c387-5f44-88bb-03552e140e7e/587ed6bb5d6c5.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5d/e5d4870c-c387-5f44-88bb-03552e140e7e/587ed6bb5d6c5.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5d/e5d4870c-c387-5f44-88bb-03552e140e7e/587ed6bb5d6c5.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5d/e5d4870c-c387-5f44-88bb-03552e140e7e/587ed6bb5d6c5.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"a8cdef9c-fb0e-52ac-b6a0-4e8a768a57e3","description":"This image released by The Weinstein Company shows Michael Keaton in a scene from, \"The Founder.\" (Tina Rowden/The Weinstein Company via AP)","byline":"Tina Rowden","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/8c/a8cdef9c-fb0e-52ac-b6a0-4e8a768a57e3/587ed6bb920cf.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/8c/a8cdef9c-fb0e-52ac-b6a0-4e8a768a57e3/587ed6bb920cf.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/8c/a8cdef9c-fb0e-52ac-b6a0-4e8a768a57e3/587ed6bb920cf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/8c/a8cdef9c-fb0e-52ac-b6a0-4e8a768a57e3/587ed6bb920cf.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"608ec6a8-4c8c-5d7b-899f-f8fab94eabf0","description":"This image released by The Weinstein Company shows John Carroll Lynch, left, and Nick Offerman in a scene from, \"The Founder.\" (Daniel McFadden/The Weinstein Company via AP)","byline":"Daniel McFadden","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/08/608ec6a8-4c8c-5d7b-899f-f8fab94eabf0/587ed6bbb7d89.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/08/608ec6a8-4c8c-5d7b-899f-f8fab94eabf0/587ed6bbb7d89.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/08/608ec6a8-4c8c-5d7b-899f-f8fab94eabf0/587ed6bbb7d89.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/08/608ec6a8-4c8c-5d7b-899f-f8fab94eabf0/587ed6bbb7d89.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"161c8bef-a29e-5dce-94bd-d93e16835cec","description":"This image released by The Weinstein Company shows Michael Keaton in a scene from, \"The Founder.\" (Daniel McFadden/The Weinstein Company via AP)","byline":"Daniel McFadden","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/61/161c8bef-a29e-5dce-94bd-d93e16835cec/587ed6bbd9cf6.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/61/161c8bef-a29e-5dce-94bd-d93e16835cec/587ed6bbd9cf6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/61/161c8bef-a29e-5dce-94bd-d93e16835cec/587ed6bbd9cf6.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/61/161c8bef-a29e-5dce-94bd-d93e16835cec/587ed6bbd9cf6.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"b9d4c748-71d3-5268-bac2-c1d34a93f08b","body":"

Ketchup, mustard, two pickles. In John Lee Hancock's \"The Founder,\" about Ray Kroc and the making of McDonald's, the ingredients for success are ruthlessly simple.

When Kroc (Michael Keaton), a struggling traveling salesmen selling milkshake mixers, first beelines to San Bernardino, California, in 1954 to get a look at Dick (Nick Offerman) and Mac (John Carroll Lynch) McDonald's burger joint, he stands agog at the counter. Moments after he orders, Kroc is handed his burger and fries in a bag, but he might as well have been flame-grilled by lightning. \"But I just ordered,\" he stutters.

Kroc quickly recognizes the revolutionary power of the McDonalds' restaurant and becomes its franchise-driver and the pre-eminent proselytizer of an empire built on burgers. The arches, an invention of Dick's just like its other innovations, will spread \"from sea to shining sea,\" Kroc vows. As a gathering place for families, it will be \"the new American church, open seven days a week,\" he says.

\"It requires a certain kind of mind to see the beauty in a hamburger bun,\" wrote David Halberstam of the minds behind McDonalds in \"The Fifties.\" Of course, the genius behind McDonald's lied largely with Dick McDonald, who engineered the \"speedee service system\" of its assembly line-like kitchen, designed its layout and focused its tiny menu.

But the ironically titled \"The Founder\" is not about him. It's about Kroc, a hard-drinking, slightly shifty Illinois salesman who took the idea of the McDonalds and spread it around the world through sheer (and sometimes unscrupulous) force of will and savvy standardization. In the opening scenes, Kroc, struggling to eke out a living on the road, faithfully listens to Norman Vincent Peale's \"The Power of Positive Thinking.\" ''Persistence, determination alone are all powerful,\" Kroc absorbs.

\"The Founder\" is a quintessentially post-war American story about a self-made man largely made by others. Kroc, who died in 1984, fashioned himself as the \"big picture\" visionary to the McDonald brothers' enterprise. Though McDonald's had by 1954 already sold 21 franchises, Kroc's zeal for expansion was compulsive and it turned him into a billionaire.

The McDonald brothers quickly realize, as Dick says, that they've let a wolf in the hen house. They begin fighting over issues that in their world are of massive importance, like milkshakes. Defending his high standards, Dick warns of \"crass commercialism\" infecting the franchise, and somewhere, Ronald McDonald chokes on a Big Mac.

But Kroc outmaneuvers them and eventually takes control of the company, leaving the run-over McDonalds to stare blankly at the yellow-and-red Frankenstein they've created. \"I'm national,\" a swelling Kroc declares. \"You're local.\"

Yet if there's any tragedy in \"The Founder,\" it's not in the fate of the McDonald brothers but in Kroc's success. The film is penned by Robert D. Siegel, whose \"The Wrestler\" and \"Big Fan\" also reflected the dark underbellies of American dreams. But \"The Founder,\" like its subject, is a little mechanical and a little too timid to really take a bite out of McDonald's. It's less a full meal than a drive-thru order.

Hancock's film stays laser-focused on Kroc, and with the naturally appealing Keaton playing him, our sympathies initially slide toward him. But unease steadily creeps in, especially as Kroc, while espousing the virtues of family, callously jettisons his quietly steadfast wife (Laura Dern) for another man's (Linda Cardellini). The bad taste of day-old McNuggets begins to form in our mouths as our hero turns villain, and a successful one at that.

Keaton chomps on the role, a Willy Loman who strikes it rich. Like Bryan Cranston on \"Breaking Bad,\" we can see the wheels turning behind his eyes in his step-by-step drive for power, albeit selling a slightly healthier product than Walter White peddled.

The frightful thing about \"The Founder,\" though, is that for all Kroc's back-stabbing and double-crossing, he's right. Remorseless brutality, just like fresh buns, turns out to be a necessary ingredient in business. Would you like fries with that?

\"The Founder,\" a Weinstein Co. release, is rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of America for \"brief strong language.\" Running time: 115 minutes. Three stars out of four.

___

MPAA Definition of PG-13: Parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

___

This story has been updated to correct the spelling of Norman Vincent Peale.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

"}, {"id":"0a7cc8af-ceab-5d6f-93da-b7f014f22c51","type":"article","starttime":"1484699806","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T18:36:46-06:00","lastupdated":"1484702141","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"movies":"entertainment/movies"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Film about 1960s black mathematicians tops MLK weekend","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/national/article_0a7cc8af-ceab-5d6f-93da-b7f014f22c51.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/national/film-about-s-black-mathematicians-tops-mlk-weekend/article_0a7cc8af-ceab-5d6f-93da-b7f014f22c51.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/film-about-s-black-mathematicians-tops-mlk-weekend/article_52186da8-1c37-5bd3-997c-e9a7934ec8d5.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 \"Hidden Figures,\" the uplifting film about African-American mathematicians at NASA during the 1960s space race, led the North American box office for the second straight week, selling $27.5 million in tickets over the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend, according to final studio figures Tuesday.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","movies","entertainment","mathematics","science"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"9b0df060-92a3-519e-b6ad-00c0033f1591","description":"This image released by Twentieth Century Fox shows Taraji P. Henson as Katherine Johnson, center, in a scene from \"Hidden Figures.\" (Hopper Stone/Twentieth Century Fox via AP)","byline":"Hopper Stone","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"342","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b0/9b0df060-92a3-519e-b6ad-00c0033f1591/587bb1b69f5e5.image.jpg?resize=512%2C342"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b0/9b0df060-92a3-519e-b6ad-00c0033f1591/587bb1b69f5e5.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b0/9b0df060-92a3-519e-b6ad-00c0033f1591/587bb1b69f5e5.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"684","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/b0/9b0df060-92a3-519e-b6ad-00c0033f1591/587bb1b69f5e5.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"0a7cc8af-ceab-5d6f-93da-b7f014f22c51","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 \"Hidden Figures,\" the uplifting film about African-American mathematicians at NASA during the 1960s space race, led the North American box office for the second straight week, selling $27.5 million in tickets over the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend, according to final studio figures Tuesday.

The Fox release, which stars Taraji P. Henson, Janelle Monae and Octavia Spencer, has now made $61.9 million following its two weeks of nationwide release. Holdovers dominated the four-day weekend, while a number of high-profile new wide releases struggled badly.

Ben Affleck's period crime thriller \"Live by Night\" managed a feeble $6 million, and Martin Scorsese's passion project, the Christian epic \"Silence,\" earned a mere $2.4 million. Paramount's pricey family film \"Monster Trucks,\" which cost $125 million, opened with just $14.2 million. In an unprecedented move, Paramount's corporate parent, Viacom, last year wrote off the film as a $115 million loss.

The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Monday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Tuesday by comScore:

1. \"Hidden Figures,\" 20th Century Fox, $27,506,839, 3,286 locations, $8,371 average, $61,889,939, 4 weeks.

2. \"Sing,\" Universal, $19,025,360, 3,693 locations, $5,152 average, $238,240,880, 4 weeks.

3. \"La La Land,\" Lionsgate, $17,717,720, 1,848 locations, $9,588 average, $77,299,289, 6 weeks.

4. \"Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,\" Disney, $16,806,712, 3,162 locations, $5,315 average, $501,898,446, 5 weeks.

5. \"The Bye Bye Man,\" STX Entertainment, $15,204,094, 2,220 locations, $6,849 average, $15,204,094, 1 week.

6. \"Monster Trucks,\" Paramount, $14,174,039, 3,119 locations, $4,544 average, $14,174,039, 1 week.

7. \"Patriots Day,\" Lionsgate, $13,753,384, 3,120 locations, $4,408 average, $14,677,466, 4 weeks.

8. \"Sleepless,\" Open Road, $9,771,305, 1,803 locations, $5,419 average, $9,771,305, 1 week.

9. \"Underworld: Blood Wars,\" Sony, $7,263,585, 3,070 locations, $2,366 average, $25,379,703, 2 weeks.

10. \"Passengers,\" Sony, $6,491,814, 2,447 locations, $2,653 average, $90,871,545, 4 weeks.

11. \"Moana,\" Disney, $6,104,745, 1,847 locations, $3,305 average, $233,410,870, 8 weeks.

12. \"Live by Night,\" Warner Bros., $6,003,052, 2,822 locations, $2,127 average, $6,188,696, 4 weeks.

13. \"Why Him?\" 20th Century Fox, $4,175,449, 1,977 locations, $2,112 average, $56,008,496, 4 weeks.

14. \"Fences,\" Paramount, $3,513,003, 1,342 locations, $2,618 average, $46,645,365, 5 weeks.

15. \"Lion,\" The Weinstein Company, $2,772,941, 575 locations, $4,823 average, $13,815,545, 8 weeks.

16. \"Silence,\" Paramount, $2,374,886, 747 locations, $3,179 average, $3,456,650, 4 weeks.

17. \"Manchester by the Sea,\" Roadside Attractions, $2,054,178, 726 locations, $2,829 average, $37,215,956, 9 weeks.

18. \"Assassin's Creed,\" 20th Century Fox, $1,658,469, 968 locations, $1,713 average, $53,162,110, 4 weeks.

19. \"Moonlight,\" A24, $1,363,803, 582 locations, $2,343 average, $14,862,562, 13 weeks.

20. \"Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them,\" Warner Bros., $1,201,902, 502 locations, $2,394 average, $231,073,227, 9 weeks.

___

Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.

"}, {"id":"997595f6-db80-5120-9ae7-08a7b79c085d","type":"article","starttime":"1484679953","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T13:05:53-06:00","lastupdated":"1484682411","priority":0,"sections":[{"movies":"entertainment/movies"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"music":"entertainment/music"},{"world":"news/world"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Mexico: no warrants for actress Kate del Castillo","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/article_997595f6-db80-5120-9ae7-08a7b79c085d.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/movies/mexico-no-warrants-for-actress-kate-del-castillo/article_997595f6-db80-5120-9ae7-08a7b79c085d.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/entertainment/mexico-no-warrants-for-actress-kate-del-castillo/article_20957e46-9b17-5a04-a391-fb97bc99f5e3.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"MEXICO CITY (AP) \u2014 The spokeswoman for Mexico's Attorney General's Office says there are no warrants for actress Kate del Castillo, but she has been \"mentioned\" in criminal investigations.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","general news","movies","entertainment","music","government and politics","drug-related crime","criminal investigations","crime","law and order"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"fc75bdc7-2d42-5f0d-9fc5-381b05c0a8e4","description":"Mexican actress Kate del Castillo gestures as she speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017, in Miami. Del Castillo said Monday that she's lost acting contracts because of the fallout of her involvement in actor Sean Penn's interview with drug lord Joaquin \"El Chapo\" Guzman. Del Castillo releases a PETA campaign Tuesday urging a boycott of Miami Seaquarium until it releases its orca named Lolita. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)","byline":"Wilfredo Lee","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"332","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/c7/fc75bdc7-2d42-5f0d-9fc5-381b05c0a8e4/587d499a0b590.image.jpg?resize=512%2C332"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/c7/fc75bdc7-2d42-5f0d-9fc5-381b05c0a8e4/587d499a0b590.image.jpg?resize=100%2C65"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"195","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/c7/fc75bdc7-2d42-5f0d-9fc5-381b05c0a8e4/587d499a0b590.image.jpg?resize=300%2C195"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"664","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/c7/fc75bdc7-2d42-5f0d-9fc5-381b05c0a8e4/587d499a0b590.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"d4f5abd1-ea66-58a6-b28e-92d732e140c5","description":"Mexican actress Kate del Castillo gestures as she speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017, in Miami. Del Castillo said Monday that she's lost acting contracts because of the fallout of her involvement in actor Sean Penn's interview with drug lord Joaquin \"El Chapo\" Guzman. Del Castillo releases a PETA campaign Tuesday urging a boycott of Miami Seaquarium until it releases its orca named Lolita. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)","byline":"Wilfredo Lee","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"381","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/4f/d4f5abd1-ea66-58a6-b28e-92d732e140c5/587d499a55724.image.jpg?resize=381%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"134","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/4f/d4f5abd1-ea66-58a6-b28e-92d732e140c5/587d499a55724.image.jpg?resize=100%2C134"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"403","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/4f/d4f5abd1-ea66-58a6-b28e-92d732e140c5/587d499a55724.image.jpg?resize=300%2C403"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1376","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/4f/d4f5abd1-ea66-58a6-b28e-92d732e140c5/587d499a55724.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"4319360a-e4d9-594b-9194-cf907b635628","description":"Mexican actress Kate del Castillo gestures as she speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017, in Miami. Del Castillo said Monday that she's lost acting contracts because of the fallout of her involvement in actor Sean Penn's interview with drug lord Joaquin \"El Chapo\" Guzman. Del Castillo releases a PETA campaign Tuesday urging a boycott of Miami Seaquarium until it releases its orca named Lolita. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)","byline":"Wilfredo Lee","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/31/4319360a-e4d9-594b-9194-cf907b635628/587d499a2dbd3.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/31/4319360a-e4d9-594b-9194-cf907b635628/587d499a2dbd3.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/31/4319360a-e4d9-594b-9194-cf907b635628/587d499a2dbd3.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/31/4319360a-e4d9-594b-9194-cf907b635628/587d499a2dbd3.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":9,"commentID":"997595f6-db80-5120-9ae7-08a7b79c085d","body":"

MEXICO CITY (AP) \u2014 The spokeswoman for Mexico's Attorney General's Office says there are no warrants for actress Kate del Castillo, but she has been \"mentioned\" in criminal investigations.

Del Castillo said in an interview with The Associated Press that a \"macho\" Mexican government is persecuting her only because she's a woman.

But spokeswoman Natalia Briseno told The AP Tuesday no sexism is involved.

Briseno said Del Castillo has been mentioned in organized crime investigations, but that doesn't mean she's a suspect.

Briseno said the actress \"has no legal impediment to enter or move freely\" in Mexico.

The investigations are apparently related to her text message conversations with now-imprisoned drug lord Joaquin \"El Chapo\" Guzman, and his potential links to her tequila business.

Del Castillo arranged Sean Penn's interview with Guzman in 2015.

"}, {"id":"0510bbed-298b-5e15-9753-6ace0e5f99c6","type":"article","starttime":"1484677830","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T12:30:30-06:00","lastupdated":"1484679759","priority":0,"sections":[{"entertainment":"entertainment"},{"movies":"entertainment/movies"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Streep, Meyers, 'Moonlight' to be honored at LGBTQ gala","url":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/article_0510bbed-298b-5e15-9753-6ace0e5f99c6.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/entertainment/streep-meyers-moonlight-to-be-honored-at-lgbtq-gala/article_0510bbed-298b-5e15-9753-6ace0e5f99c6.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/entertainment/streep-meyers-moonlight-to-be-honored-at-lgbtq-gala/article_0d7efd48-bcbe-5b7d-a96a-34d7777af692.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Actress Meryl Streep, TV host Seth Meyers, and the Golden Globe-winning movie \"Moonlight\" will be honored next month by the Human Rights Campaign, the LGBTQ civil rights organization.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","arts and entertainment","celebrity","entertainment","gays and lesbians","human rights and civil liberties","movies","social issues","social affairs"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"68f441dc-fab3-5e47-a75b-1d5ac477e5ef","description":"FILE - This Jan. 8, 2017 file image released by NBC shows Meryl Streep accepting the Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills, Calif. Streep, who gave an impassioned speech at the Golden Globes criticizing President-elect Donald Trump for mocking a disabled reporter and calling for the defense of a free press, will be honored for a career of advocating for LGBTQ equality on Feb. 11, by the Human Rights Campaign, the LGBTQ civil rights organization. (Paul Drinkwater/NBC via AP, File)","byline":"Paul Drinkwater","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"341","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/8f/68f441dc-fab3-5e47-a75b-1d5ac477e5ef/587e6633cfa03.image.jpg?resize=512%2C341"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/8f/68f441dc-fab3-5e47-a75b-1d5ac477e5ef/587e6633cfa03.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/8f/68f441dc-fab3-5e47-a75b-1d5ac477e5ef/587e6633cfa03.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/8f/68f441dc-fab3-5e47-a75b-1d5ac477e5ef/587e6633cfa03.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"0510bbed-298b-5e15-9753-6ace0e5f99c6","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Actress Meryl Streep, TV host Seth Meyers, and the Golden Globe-winning movie \"Moonlight\" will be honored next month by the Human Rights Campaign, the LGBTQ civil rights organization.

The award for \"Moonlight,\" a coming-of-age film about a black gay youth, will be accepted by Tarell Alvin McCraney, the author of the play on which the film is based.

Meyers, the host of \"Late Night with Seth Meyers\" on NBC, is being honored at the Feb. 11 gala for raising awareness about LGBTQ issues, including drawing attention to discriminatory legislation.

Streep, who gave an impassioned speech at the Golden Globes criticizing President-elect Donald Trump for mocking a disabled reporter and calling for the defense of a free press, will be honored for a career of advocating for LGBTQ equality.

"}, {"id":"6588ed30-da96-5363-a021-15c389ec9401","type":"article","starttime":"1484673127","starttime_iso8601":"2017-01-17T11:12:07-06:00","lastupdated":"1484675206","priority":0,"sections":[{"govt-and-politics":"news/national/govt-and-politics"},{"movies":"entertainment/movies"},{"entertainment":"entertainment"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"CNN's documentary 'The End' tracks end of Obama presidency","url":"http://qctimes.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/article_6588ed30-da96-5363-a021-15c389ec9401.html","permalink":"http://qctimes.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/cnn-s-documentary-the-end-tracks-end-of-obama-presidency/article_6588ed30-da96-5363-a021-15c389ec9401.html","canonical":"http://news.lee.net/news/national/govt-and-politics/cnn-s-documentary-the-end-tracks-end-of-obama-presidency/article_31a04d79-f587-5780-8420-e075ab504daf.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By FRAZIER MOORE\nAP Television Writer","prologue":"NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Less than 48 hours before President Barack Obama leaves office, CNN will air an intimate tribute told through the workdays and accounts of key White House staff members.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wire","politics","arts and entertainment","government and politics","television programs","entertainment","documentaries","movies"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"4c84ac17-e07d-5193-af91-6d5bb9b1d7b8","description":"President Barack Obama waves to people in the community during a visit to the Jobs Have Priority Naylor Road Family Shelter in Washington, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)","byline":"Susan Walsh","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"338","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/c8/4c84ac17-e07d-5193-af91-6d5bb9b1d7b8/587e4398740c4.image.jpg?resize=512%2C338"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/c8/4c84ac17-e07d-5193-af91-6d5bb9b1d7b8/587e4398740c4.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"198","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/c8/4c84ac17-e07d-5193-af91-6d5bb9b1d7b8/587e4398740c4.image.jpg?resize=300%2C198"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"676","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/c8/4c84ac17-e07d-5193-af91-6d5bb9b1d7b8/587e4398740c4.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"c1bfc2c2-b3c5-578b-8099-a16a94079852","description":"President Barack Obama watches as children play on the \"Malia and Sasha's Castle,\" the playground that the Obamas donated to the Jobs Have Priority Naylor Road Family Shelter in Washington, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)","byline":"Susan Walsh","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"354","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/1b/c1bfc2c2-b3c5-578b-8099-a16a94079852/587e4398bb48c.image.jpg?resize=512%2C354"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"69","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/1b/c1bfc2c2-b3c5-578b-8099-a16a94079852/587e4398bb48c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C69"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"207","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/1b/c1bfc2c2-b3c5-578b-8099-a16a94079852/587e4398bb48c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C207"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"708","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/1b/c1bfc2c2-b3c5-578b-8099-a16a94079852/587e4398bb48c.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"d0d7b95b-25d2-5703-9de4-0c849a676c8a","description":"FILE - This Aug. 22, 2016 file photo shows White House press secretary Josh Earnest arriving for a daily briefing at the White House in Washington. Earnest, chief speechwriter Cody Keenan and senior adviser Valerie Jarrett are featured in a two-hour documentary about President Barack Obama told through the workdays and accounts of key White House staff members. \u201cThe End: Inside the Last Days of the Obama White House, airs Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017 at 9p.m. EST on CNN. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)","byline":"Susan Walsh","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"329","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/0d/d0d7b95b-25d2-5703-9de4-0c849a676c8a/587e549f8177e.image.jpg?resize=512%2C329"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"64","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/0d/d0d7b95b-25d2-5703-9de4-0c849a676c8a/587e549f8177e.image.jpg?resize=100%2C64"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"193","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/0d/d0d7b95b-25d2-5703-9de4-0c849a676c8a/587e549f8177e.image.jpg?resize=300%2C193"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"658","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/0d/d0d7b95b-25d2-5703-9de4-0c849a676c8a/587e549f8177e.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"6588ed30-da96-5363-a021-15c389ec9401","body":"

NEW YORK (AP) \u2014 Less than 48 hours before President Barack Obama leaves office, CNN will air an intimate tribute told through the workdays and accounts of key White House staff members.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0 \u00a0But however worthy it may be, this two-hour documentary, airing Wednesday at 9 p.m. EST, may face a wary reception.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0 For those who have disagreed with Obama's policies and even questioned his citizenship the past eight years, this film is unlikely at such a late date to stir a reappraisal of his legacy or character.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0Meanwhile, for others, the film will be yet another painful reminder of what will soon be over and what might have been.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0Presumably without meaning to plumb the depths of despair gripping Obama's supporters, the program strikes an elegiac chord with its title: \"The End: Inside the Last Days of the Obama White House.\"

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0Spanning the past two months, \"The End\" ends, fittingly, with Obama's farewell address last week in Chicago.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0It begins on election day, as Hillary Clinton's electoral-college defeat by Donald Trump is received at the White House with shock and grief.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0But then we see Obama bucking up his thunderstruck staff.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\"Everybody is sad when their side loses an election,\" the president says. \"But we all have to remember we're all on one team.\"

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0Chief speechwriter Cody Keenan, one of the figures followed through the documentary, crafted the president's magnanimous remarks. In his windowless office in the White House basement, he concedes those words are \"obviously not the ones I wanted to be writing.\"

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0Another recurring character, press secretary Josh Earnest, gathers his crew to prep for a news conference as they scramble for grounding in the flood of events.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\"Just don't look at Twitter,\" cracks one of his fellow writers and they all laugh.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0Nothing in particular is cited from the tweets Trump has made part of his routine.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\"That's a good rule for life,\" Earnest replies instead.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0Along with tying up the many loose ends of Obama's presidency, these busy last weeks are devoted to arranging an efficient, secure handoff to his successor.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\"Our job is to turn it over to them in as good a shape as possible,\" says Obama senior adviser Valerie Jarrett. (All agree that the transition team of President George W. Bush set a high standard for cooperation and comity that the Obama administration aspires to meet as it vacates.)

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0 But there are other, less weighty tasks. Keenan and his staff must hatch a collection of puns for Obama's eighth annual pardoning of the Thanksgiving turkeys (the Chief Executive can't be expected to wing it).

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0 Then, in a welcome antic moment, the fortunate fowl \u2014 Tater and Tot \u2014 are seen prior to the ceremony in their luxe DC accommodations: a suite at the Willard Intercontinental hotel.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0 As the days count down, the film's participants reflect on what they've experienced in bittersweet terms.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0 \u00a0Keenan recalls the nation's crisis state in 2009 when Obama took office. He confides that many White House newbies were alarmed.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\"The president was the one with the cool head who told us all, 'Read some FDR (whose administration confronted the Great Depression and World War II, among other challenges). See what he told people when it was bleak and when they were scared.'\"

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0Counting their victories, the film's subjects note with pride the Affordable Care Act \u2014 and think back on the brawl that nearly derailed it.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\"What I learned,\" says Jarrett, \"was how willing people in this town were to put their short-term political interests far ahead of what's good for the country.\"

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0Of course, even as this show premieres, the President-elect and other foes of Obama's health care law are already rallied as never before to carry out their vendetta.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0Little wonder that \"The End,\" despite its good intentions, will strike some of its viewers as being less about the Obama era it recognizes than about the two-month run-up to a change they dread that starts with Friday's swearing-in.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0For those viewers, \"The End\" spells the end of the Obama presidency, and the end of so much more.

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0_____

EDITOR'S NOTE \u2014 Frazier Moore is a national television columnist for The Associated Press. He can be reached at fmoore@ap.org and at http://www.twitter.com/tvfrazier. Past stories are available at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/frazier-moore

_____

Online:

http://www.cnn.com/shows/last-days-of-the-obama-white-house

"} ]