Trinity Regional Health System officials will announce Thursday their plans to build a 90,000-square-foot, three-story expansion of its Heart Center and emergency department at the Trinity Rock Island campus, pending regulatory approval from the state of Illinois. 

The $61.3 million construction project, which would be located at the front of the existing hospital building, would be the largest in the facility’s history. The expansion is designed to improve patient safety and privacy, better coordinate care, reduce operational costs and accommodate increased demand, Trinity officials said in a news release issued today. The expansion would represent one of the largest financial investments in the Quad-Cities in recent years, officials added.

Over the past 40 years, Trinity, which also has hospitals in Moline, Bettendorf and Muscatine, has consistently kept up to date with changes in medical advances and technology, officials said, but it has made very few capital improvements to the Rock Island hospital building, formerly known as Franciscan Medical Center. Officials said the rapidly increasing number of patients in its emergency department, cardiac treatment unit and psychiatric crisis service areas has stretched those units beyond their capacity and prompted the need for expansion.

According to a news release, Trinity’s board of directors is committed to keeping local dollars in the community by partnering with engineering, architectural, interior design and construction firms from the Quad-Cities, thereby creating local jobs.

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