When I ordered my internet, I provided my Social Security number (SSN) and credit card number. I know these numbers are in their system because I am asked to verify the last four digits of my SSN every time I call.

In December, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released rules requiring internet service providers to disclose if and when they were hacked, and consumer personal information had been leaked.

It requires them to seek permission before selling your information to third-parties. It seems this is common sense; how can you protect your identity if you don't know it's been compromised?

U.S. Sens. Chuck Grassley and Joni Ernst voted in favor of blocking these rules and forbade the FCC from similar rules in the future.

Reps. Steve King, David Young, and Rod Blum voted in favor; the bill is now law, and these rules will not go into effect. I called with a simple question: Could they provide just one rule they disagreed with?

Only Sen. Ernst's office responded. However, she refused to identify any rule she disagreed with, but offered, "The FCC's rule singled out certain companies within the Internet ecosystem, hampering them with new, extremely narrow rules, while allowing others to operate by a more favorable set of rules."

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It seems she is implying these rules should be in effect for all internet companies, while describing the situation where companies are allowed to conceal their security gaffes as "favorable."

We take consumer privacy for granted; why does it have to be a partisan issue?

Alex Mitchell

Grinnell, Iowa

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