esports

Visitors at the Paris Games Week trade show in 2017 playing Call of Duty: World War II. Credit Kamil Zihnioglu/Associated Press

Thumbs up to Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller, who this week pitched legislation that would bar credit rating agencies from leveling fees on consumers seeking a security freeze.

More than a million Iowans were affected by last year's data breach at Equifax, Miller said. None of them consented to let the massive credit rating agency compile personal data. And yet, when errors happen at the corporate level, the onus again falls to the consumer to report and pay the fees.

Thumbs down to Gov. Bruce Rauner for a confounding veto that stalled sweeping changes to Illinois' educational funding model that Rauner once derided, then supported and now features in campaign commercials.

On Monday, Rauner used his amendatory veto to demand changes that would benefit a few private schools, while throwing another unnecessary wrench in an already malfunctioning state government. While school district don't expect the release of the funds for a couple more months, Rauner's move only adds more uncertainty that's become the hallmark of his administration.

Thumbs up to St. Ambrose University for adding esports to its roster of available athletics.

Competitve video gaming might not meet what most thing of when sports come to mind. But the tech-based competitions are blowing up nationally. In fact, esports contests drew more eyeballs than the NFL last year, according to research firm SuperData. The 2024 summer Olympics might even feature esports. 

Esports not only represent a population largely removed from college athletics, they also promote technical know-how.

It's hard to win at Overwatch or Counter Strike: Global Offensive, for example, unless your machine is cranking unusually high frame rates. That means competitors are acutely aware of hardware and software limitations. 

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