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  • By PAUL J. WEBER and WILL WEISSERT Associated Press
  • Updated

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A proposed Texas "bathroom bill" targeting transgender people neared collapse Friday over a deadlock between Republicans heeding warnings from big businesses and sports leagues — including Google and the NFL — and social conservatives who drive the state's political agenda.

  • John O'Connor
  • Updated

Illinois state Sen. Kwame Raoul, D-Chicago, speaks with reporters at the Capitol in Springfield on Friday, May 26, 2017. What qualifies as Ill…

  • By JOHN O'CONNOR AP Political Writer
  • Updated

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Senate Democrats made good Friday on their pledge to pick apart the workers' compensation system at the behest of Rep…

  • By PAUL J. WEBER Associated Press
  • Updated

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The Texas Legislature approved a sweeping package of new abortion limits Friday, despite the legal challenges they're likely to provoke and nearly a year after the U.S. Supreme Court dismantled a 2013 law that prompted more than half the state's abortion clinics to close.

  • Tony Dejak
  • Updated

Celiah Aker poses at her desk at home, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, in Medina, Ohio. Aker is in ninth grade and it is her fifth year at Electronic Cl…

  • Tony Dejak
  • Updated

Celiah Aker works on her business and administrative services class at her desk at home, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, in Medina, Ohio. Aker is in nin…

  • Tony Dejak
  • Updated

Celiah Aker works on her business and administrative services class at her desk at home, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, in Medina, Ohio. Aker is in nin…

  • By JULIE CARR SMYTH and KANTELE FRANKO Associated Press
  • Updated

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — As U.S. children flock to virtual charter schools, states are struggling to catch up and develop rules to make sure the students get a real education and schools get the right funding.

  • Updated

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A lawsuit accusing the NFL and team owners of conspiring to suppress wages for cheerleaders lacks evidence to support that claim, a federal judge said.

U.S. District Judge William Alsup dismissed the lawsuit by a former San Francisco 49ers cheerleader. The suit sought class action status on behalf of all NFL cheerleaders.

"To state an antitrust claim here, plaintiff must plead not only 'ultimate facts, such as conspiracy, and legal conclusions,'" Alsup said. "The complaint must answer the basic questions of 'who, did what, to whom (or with whom), where, and when?'"

An email to an attorney for the 49ers cheerleader, Drexel Bradshaw, was not immediately returned. The cheerleader was only identified in the suit as "Kelsey K."

Alsup gave her an opportunity to amend the lawsuit and refile it by June 15.

The lawsuit was among a spate of legal actions in recent years accusing NFL teams of failing to pay cheerleaders for hours they spent practicing and making public appearances.

California legislation signed by Gov. Jerry Brown two years ago requires cheerleaders receive at least minimum wage and overtime and sick leave if they work for professional sports teams based in California.

The lawsuit before Alsup claimed that cheerleaders received only a flat, per-game fee. It also said the NFL and its teams conspired to prohibit cheerleaders from seeking employment with other professional cheerleading teams and from discussing their earnings with each other.

Alsup said he would expect at least some evidence to support a conspiracy on the scale alleged in the lawsuit — possibly a former NFL employee coming forward to "provide the details of 'who, did what, to whom (or with whom), where, and when' regarding some actual conspiratorial meeting, communication or agreement."

The lawsuit, instead, alleges similar policies for cheerleaders among NFL teams, Alsup said. The judge said those policies could just as easily have been implemented by each team independently.

AP
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PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Gov. Gina Raimondo says she can't support a proposed funding bill for a new Pawtucket Red Sox stadium.