Cully Payne will complete his college basketball career elsewhere.

The Iowa point guard who missed the final 26 games of his sophomore season with a sports injury has asked for and been granted a release from his scholarship, Hawkeye coach Fran McCaffery confirmed this morning.

“We appreciate Cully’s hard work and contributions to the Iowa basketball program the last two years,’’ McCaffery said in a statement. “We are thankful for Cully that he has been able to make a full recovery from his injury and wish him nothing but the best in his future endeavors.’’

Payne indicated on both Twitter and his Facebook page late Monday evening that he was “ready to move on.’’

“It’s about time that I close this chapter in my life and get ready to move on,’’ he wrote.

In a statement issued today through the Iowa sports information office, Payne said the decision to leave was a collaborative one.

“My family and I felt like this decision was best for me moving forward,’’ Payne said. “I truly ap-preciate the experience I was offered and wish my teammates nothing but the best in the future.’’

Payne started all 37 games he played in during his Hawkeye career. He averaged 8 points and 3.8 assists per game in an Iowa uniform, earning Big Ten all-freshman honors during his first season.

The 6-foot-1 Payne would be required to sit out next season if he transfers to another Division I program. He would have two years of eligibility remaining in that situation.

Payne’s departure leaves McCaffery with three available scholarships for the spring signing period.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.