This winter has created a record amount of snow, but it's this week's warmup that will take the Quad-Cities down a very slushy road.

Monday heaped 5.9 inches of snow on the area, breaking the record for snowiest winter in Quad-Cities recorded history with a total of 53.3 inches since Dec. 1.

"I think we've seen enough," National Weather Service  meteorologist Dan Ferry said.

He's looking ahead, wondering where the inch of rain expected to fall Wednesday and Thursday will go. The ground is still frozen, and even Tuesday's expected high of 40 degrees probably won't be enough to melt the snow.

Rock Island Public Works director Randy Tweet said this week may be warmer, but it will be messy with rain in the forecast and snow likely blocking many catch basins.

“We’ll get more runoff into the streets,” Tweet said. “I suspect it will be incredibly messy. We do get a number of street flooding calls when that happens.

“We try to plow all the way to the curb, but most catch basins are at the intersections, and it is hard to keep those clear.”

As if this winter wasn't satisfied being the snowiest, there's still more in the forecast for this weekend as temperatures will drop from the 40s back into the low 30s.

Winter for the Weather Service is from Dec. 1 to Feb. 28.

The previous snowiest winter was 1978-79, when a total of 52.9 inches of snow fell. The winter of 2007-08 held the title of second snowiest until Monday. That season had 48.7 inches.

Randy Tweet's parents, Roald and Margaret Tweet of Rock Island, remember the winter of 1978-79.

They were taking a bus trip home from Minnesota during a major storm when the bus got stranded overnight in Des Moines, Margaret Tweet said. The next day, they reached a sign stating there were 24 miles left to Davenport, and Tweet said that because of the snow, it took the bus two hours to go that distance.

"There was just a lot of snow," she said.

Many Quad-Citians kept a good attitude despite the harsh season, Tweet remembered.

"About a week after the big snow, people were so polite and thoughtful," she said. "Everybody gave way to everybody else."

Walking in the street was a common occurrence, she added.

Growing up in the north-central Illinois town of Streator, National Weather Service meteorologist Brian Pierce said he remembers the winter of 1978-79.

"I remember the bitter cold," he said. "That's the winter everyone talks about. The cold was far more extreme back then."

For those who have woken up to dead car batteries this season, Pierce said the latest cold spell doesn't even compare to years past.

"We're not even in the top 10," he said.

In addition to once being the snowiest, the winter of 1978-79 also was the coldest, with an average temperature of 14.4 degrees. Pierce said the average temperature for January 1979 was 6.3 degrees, the coldest month ever recorded.

"It was horribly cold in January '79," Pierce said. "I remember every time it would warm up, it would snow."

This February was shaping up to be far colder than normal. Pierce said the average temperature this February until Sunday was 8.2 degrees, 10 degrees below normal.

With warmer days in the forecast the rest of the week, the average is likely to climb, Pierce said.

The coldest February in the Quad-Cities occurred in 1875, with an average temperature of 9.4 degrees.

"Theoretically, we're colder than that, but we're supposed to experience warmer temperatures the rest of the week," Pierce said. "If we get highs in the 40s and lows in the 20s, we're going to turn around and warm up that average temperature really fast."

(Kurt Allemeier contributed to this story.)


EARLIER UPDATE

At 53.3 inches, this is the snowiest winter on record, the National Weather Service reports.


EARLIER UPDATE

This winter is closing in on the record snowiest for the Quad-Cities.

As of noon today, 51 inches of snow has fallen since Dec. 1, placing this winter so far in second place and just two inches behind first place, National Weather Service meteorologist Brian Pierce said. Winter for the Weather Service is from Dec. 1 to Feb. 28.

"This winter season is closing in on the record," he said.

The snowiest winter was 1978-79, when a total of 53 inches of snow fell. The winter of 2007-08 held the title of second snowiest until today. That season had 48.9 inches.

Pierce said snow is continuing to fall this afternoon and another measurement will be taken at 6 p.m. There's also snow in the forecast for this weekend.

Growing up in the north-central Illinois town of Streator, Pierce said he remembers the winter of 1978-79.

"I remember the bitter cold," he said. "That's the winter everyone talks about. The cold was far more extreme back then."

For those who have woken up to dead car batteries this season, Pierce said the latest cold spell doesn't even compare to years past.

"We're not even in the top 10," he said.

In addition to being the snowiest, the winter of 1978-79 also was the coldest, with an average temperature of 14.4 degrees. Pierce said the average temperature for January 1979 was 6.3 degrees, the coldest month ever recorded.

"It was horribly cold in January '79," Pierce said. "I remember every time it would warm up it would snow."

This February was shaping up to be far colder than normal. Pierce said the average temperature this February until Sunday was 8.2 degrees, 10 degrees below normal.

With warmer days in the forecast the rest of the week, the average is likely to climb, Pierce said.

The coldest February in the Quad-Cities occurred in 1875, with an average temperature of 9.4 degrees.

"Theoretically, we're colder than that, but we're supposed to experience warmer temperatures the rest of the week," Pierce said. "If we get highs in the 40s and lows in the 20s, we're going to turn around and warm up that average temperature really fast."


1 p.m. update: Wintry weather is moving east and snow has ended across much of Iowa and Missouri, according to the National Weather Service


12:30 p.m. update: Davenport has extended its snow emergency until 5 a.m. Tuesday.  


Noon update: Winter storm warning now in effect until 4 p.m. with additional snow accumulation of 1-3 inches. Winds will reduce visibilities to 1/4 or less at times. Westbound I-80 traffic near Durant is blocked because of a crash.


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11:30 a.m. update: Travel in rural Scott County is not recommended because of extremely limited visibility from blowing snow, according to the Scott County Sheriff's Department. If you must travel, use extreme caution, make sure you have a severe weather travel kit and that someone knows your travel route and estimated time of arrival.


10:30 a.m. update: Snow — heavy at times with snowfall rates of more than an inch an hour — can be expected over the region. Winds will continue to decrease to 10-15 mph over the next hour limiting any further drifting of snow. Snow is expected to end between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. with additional snowfall totals between 2-4 inches.


9:30 a.m.: Freezing rain and sleet should change over to all snow between 9:30 a.m. to 11 am. Additional ice accumulations should be less than 1/10 inch, according to the National Weather Service.


8:30 a.m.: Snow is falling on the Quad-Cities. Roads are slippery, especially on hills. Sleet is being reported across the state. Travel is not advised. The National Weather Service is forecasting a total daytime snow accumulation of around 5 inches.


7:30 a.m. update from the National Weather Service: A wintry mix of snow, sleet and some freezing rain travellng northeast is now moving into the Quad-City area. It should reach Clinton by 8:20 a.m.

As the storm moves north it should become less sleet and freezing rain and more snow with initial accumulations up to an inch by 9 a.m. with heavier snow bands currently in central Iowa to follow.

These conditions will create slick roads and gusty winds will cause considerable drifting of snow affecting visibilities in rural open areas.


EARLIER REPORT: Driving could be risky Monday morning and afternoon, according to the National Weather Service, Davenport.

A winter weather advisory is in effect is from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, according to meteorologist David Cousins.

“We look for snow to develop in the Quad-Cities by 6 a.m. Monday,” Cousins said. “Snow will move through the area between 6 a.m. and noon, with the potential for 3 to 4 inches over that period.”

There could be some heavy snow at times, with reduced visibility, Cousin said. “It won’t be a big snowfall event, but it will be quick.” He said there is a possibility of freezing rain south of a line from Fairfield, Iowa, to Galesburg, Ill. That will slowly spread eastward, then change over to sleet and all snow by mid-morning, he said.

Davenport Public Works Director Mike Clarke has declared a snow emergency from 5 a.m. Monday to 3 p.m. Monday. Parking on posted snow routes is prohibited when a snow emergency is declared, communications director Jennifer Nahra said in a news release.

Parking off the street when possible during any snow/ice event is always recommended to help city crews provide better service.

Questions can be directed to the Davenport Public Works office at 563-326-7923 during regular business hours.

Temperatures will be about 20 early Monday south of and along Interstate 80. Monday afternoon, temperatures will be in the middle 30s along Interstate 80 to the upper 30s in the Burlington area, Cousins said.

On Tuesday, highs will be about 40 in the Quad-Cities to the middle 40s in southeast Iowa.

Wednesday’s highs will be in the upper 30s in the Quad-Cities, Cousins said. The next chance of precipitation is a 70 percent chance of rain Wednesday night.

From the National Weather Service: A band of wintry mix of snow, sleet and some freezing rain travellng northeast is now moving into the area. It should reach the Clinton area by 8:20 a.m.

As the storm moves north it should become less sleet and freezing rain and more snow with initial accumulations up to an inch by 9 a.m. with heavier snow bands currently in central Iowa to follow.

These conditions will create slick roads and gusty winds will cause considerable drifting of snow affecting visibilities in rural open areas.

-- Linda Cook