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The Supreme Court’s conservative majority is sounding sympathetic to a Christian graphic artist who objects to designing wedding websites for gay couples. But in arguments Monday, liberal justices suggested that allowing that discrimination could open the door to broader refusals by businesses to serve Black, Jewish or Islamic customers, interracial couples and many others. The Colorado case is the latest clash of religion and gay rights to land at the high court. A case involving a Colorado baker and a wedding cake for a gay couple ended with a limited decision five years ago and is to return to the court.

    California could become the first state to fine big oil companies for making too much money. The proposal is a reaction to the oil industry's supersized profits following a summer of record-high gas prices in the nation's most populous state. Gov. Gavin Newsom and his Democratic allies in the state Legislature introduced the bill on Monday. But the proposal is missing key details. It does not say how much profit is too much or how much the fine would be for oil companies exceeding it. Newsom said those details would be sorted out after negotiations with the state Legislature.

      The unabashedly liberal city of San Francisco became the unlikely proponent of weaponized police robots last week after supervisors approved them for limited use. In doing so, the board addressed head-on an evolving technology that's become more widely available, although rarely deployed to confront suspects. San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott said armed robots would be used only as a last resort. Three members of the city's Board of Supervisors joined dozens of protesters against the policy outside City Hall on Monday. Police departments across the U.S. are facing increasing scrutiny of militarized equipment, amid a yearslong national reckoning on criminal justice.

        Jurors in the Trump Organization’s criminal tax fraud trial will continue deliberating for a second day on Tuesday as they weigh charges that former President Donald Trump’s company helped executives dodge personal income taxes on perks. Jurors deliberated for about four hours on Monday. The deliberations follow a monthlong trial that featured testimony from seven witnesses, including longtime Trump Organization finance chief Allen Weisselberg and Senior Vice President and Controller Jeffrey McConney. An outside accountant who spent years preparing tax returns for Trump and the company also testified.

        The Minnesota Board of Pharmacy is suing a Moorhead-based manufacturer of THC-laced gummies, saying the company’s candies contain far stronger doses of the chemical that gives marijuana its high than state law allows. The lawsuit filed Monday alleges that Northland Vapor and its stores in Moorhead and Bemidji are violating Minnesota’s new law allowing low-potency edible and drinkable cannabinoids. It alleges investigators found candies with 20 times the legal dose and packages containing 50 times the limit. The board says it has embargoed the products, which it says have a retail value of over $7 million

        The World Cup stadium was designed to leave a minimal footprint in the Qatari sand. It’s now due to be dismantled. Stadium 974 played host to seven matches. The one one was Brazil’s 4-1 win over South Korea in the last 16 on Monday. Qatar says the stadium will disappear. But it isn’t clear when that will happen. The country will soon stage an Asian Cup, the multi-sport Asian Games and maybe even a Summer Olympics. The big question is what happens next for Qatar's venues after the World Cup ends.

        This week’s new entertainment releases include Will Smith’s comeback campaign in the Antoine Fuqua movie “Emancipation,” a documentary about Broadway star Idina Menzel, the video game “Dragon Quest Treasures” and a TV series exploring the tumultuous relationship between country music stars Tammy Wynette and George Jones. Director Guillermo del Toro finally gets to release his version of "Pinocchio” and there's a holiday-themed romantic comedy at Amazon Prime about a jewelry mix-up that leads to sparks in “Something from Tiffany’s.” Can’t get to New York but still want to hear chart-toppers? Join the iHeartRadio Jingle Ball Tour at Madison Square Garden with Dua Lipa, Lizzo, and Charlie Puth,

        A Memphis hospital says it has paused, not stopped, its gender-affirming services in response to possible legal action by civil rights advocates who argue the hospital’s move is illegal and discriminatory. The American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee last week accused Memphis-based Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare of halting all gender-affirming surgeries due to a newly adopted policy. The hospital said in a statement it has not changed its practices “regarding the treatment of transgender and/or non-binary patients.” A spokesperson for the ACLU-TN hasn't responded to an email requesting comment Monday. MLH's website says the hospital serves more than 128,000 adult Medicaid patients each year.

        The United States and European Union have agreed to intensify talks to resolve EU concerns over major subsidies for American companies contained in a U.S. clean energy law. Although no deal was reached at talks Monday, the two sides pledged to continue work and push for a solution that benefits both U.S. and European firms, workers and consumers. The U.S. Inflation Reduction Act offers about $375 billion in new and extended tax credits to help the the U.S. clean energy industry as well as buyers of qualifying electric vehicles made in North America. But European leaders have expressed alarm that the subsidies would be an enormous setback for European companies.

        A North Dakota legislative panel has refused to change a rule that creates a moratorium on electronic pull tab machines at gas stations and liquor, grocery and convenience stores. Lobbyists and some lawmakers have promised that the issue will come up again in the next legislative session. The bipartisan Administrative Rules Committee supported the North Dakota Gaming Commission vote to alter the definition of a bar to clarify where the Las Vegas-style games that mimic slot machines will be allowed. The new rule specifies that a bar does not include gas stations and liquor, grocery and convenience stores.

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        The German chemical company BASF will restore damaged natural resources at a notorious Superfund site in New Jersey where decades or pollution and illegal dumping caused vast contamination of the environment. The state Department of Environmental Protection says it has a deal with BASF to restore conditions at the former Ciba Geigy plant in Toms River. BASF, based in Ludwigshafen, Germany, is the corporate successor to Ciba Geigy. Cleanup efforts have been ongoing for decades at the site and will continue, even as the environmental restoration work proceeds. Work is expected to begin in the spring and last for five years.

        The unmarked graves in a forgotten West Virginia burial ground known locally as Little Egypt contain the remains of dozens of coal mine workers who died in a 1912 explosion. For Ed Evans, a Democratic state lawmaker and retired school teacher, they are a reminder of the dangers of undoing mine safety regulations, currently under debate in the state Legislature. Evans says he worries about what will happen now that many advocates of the mine safety laws, himself included, were defeated in the Nov. 8 election. With Republicans gaining an even tighter grip on the Legislature, lawmakers are expected to make another run at further deregulating the agencies that monitor mine safety.

        The unmarked graves in a forgotten West Virginia burial ground known locally as Little Egypt contain the remains of dozens of coal mine workers who died in a 1912 mine explosion. For Ed Evans, a Democratic state lawmaker and retired school teacher, they are a reminder of the dangers of undoing mine safety regulations, currently under debate in the state Legislature. Evans says he worries about what will happen now that many advocates of the mine safety laws, himself included, were defeated in the Nov. 8 election. With Republicans gaining an even tighter grip on the Legislature, lawmakers are expected to make another run at further deregulating the agencies that monitor mine safety.

        The Port of Savannah plans a $410 million overhaul of one of its sprawling terminals to make room for loading and unloading larger ships. The Georgia Ports Authority board approved the project Monday under a plan to expand Savannah's capacity for cargo containers by more than 50% by 2025. It means major changes for the port's Ocean Terminal, which currently handles most of Georgia's breakbulk cargo such as lumber, paper and steel. Those operations will move over the coming year to the nearby Port of Brunswick. Ocean Terminal will be upgraded with new berths and eight ship-to-shore cranes, allowing the complex to focus almost exclusively on cargo shipped in containers.

        Commodities company Glencore has reached an agreement with the Democratic Republic of Congo to pay $180 million over bribery allegations spanning from 2007 to 2018. The announcement Monday comes months after the Anglo-Swiss company said it solidified deals with authorities in the U.S., Britain and Brazil to pay a total of $1.5 billion to resolve all accusations of corruption and market manipulation. The U.S. Justice Department said in May that in Congo, Glencore acknowledged that it paid $27.5 million to third parties with the goal that a portion be used to bribe Congolese officials to secure improper business advantages.

        Major Western measures to limit Russia’s oil profits over the war in Ukraine have taken effect. They bring uncertainty about how much crude could be lost to the world and whether they will unleash the hoped-for hit to a Russian economy that's held up better than many expected under sanctions. Starting Monday, the European Union is banning most Russian oil and the Group of Seven democracies has imposed a price cap of $60 per barrel on Russian exports to other countries. The impact may be blunted because Russia has been able reroute much of its European seaborne shipments to China, India and Turkey, although at steep discounts. Plus, the price cap is near what Russian oil already cost.

        “Tracers In The Dark" by Andy Greenberg sketches the evolution of a wholly new discipline — the tracking of cryptocurrency transactions by a new breed of digital sleuths. They take down Silk Road and other “dark web” markets and merchants, finger crypto money launderers and snare the sysadmin and users  a major distributor of child sexual abuse material. Associated Press Technology Writer Frank Bajak calls the book a surprisingly lively real-life police procedural whose author, a writer for Wired, deftly teases out technical detail without slowing the narrative. There are takedown dramas and well told is how Dutch cyber police surreptitiously take over and run the Hansa dark web marketplace.

        Pfizer has announced a $750 million project toward expanding capacity at the western Michigan pharmaceutical plant where the company first mass produced its COVID-19 vaccine. Company officials said Monday the project will boost the plant’s manufacturing of sterile injectable medications and could lead to 300 new jobs at the Portage plant near Kalamazoo that now has about 3,000 workers. Pfizer executive David Breen said the project will help ensure uninterrupted supply for medicines and vaccines, including those based on mRNA technology used in its COVID-19 vaccine. The plant first started shipping the COVID-19 vaccines in December 2020.

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