[ {"id":"a39bda1d-0551-5504-b041-a05d7e655ecd","type":"article","starttime":"1601096400","starttime_iso8601":"2020-09-26T00:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1601099042","sections":[{"lifestyles":"lifestyles"},{"john_marx":"lifestyles/john_marx"},{"news":"news"},{"local":"news/local"}],"flags":{"top_story":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"MARX: Nothing but gratitude","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/article_a39bda1d-0551-5504-b041-a05d7e655ecd.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/marx-nothing-but-gratitude/article_a39bda1d-0551-5504-b041-a05d7e655ecd.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/marx-nothing-but-gratitude/article_a39bda1d-0551-5504-b041-a05d7e655ecd.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"JOHN MARX\njmarx@qconline.com","prologue":"Today's sermonette is my last offering as a full-time employee of Lee Enterprises, ending a 35-year career. It's good. Seriously, all is well. Going forward, I'll write an every-other-week column for the Dispatch-Argus and the Quad-City Times. As a correspondent, I'll forfeit my office, parking space and key to the executive bathroom. Just kidding, there's no executive bathroom.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["lee enterprises","the dispatch","rock island argus","jerry taylor","gerry huiskamp","jeff collins","jim tappa sr.","jim meenan","work","medicine","mike horsfield","job","office","gary hendren"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"a3fc4854-ea99-5cc2-b074-0828d78ff8c8","description":"John Marx, columnist/reporter, Quad-City Times, Dispatch-Argus","byline":"KEVIN E. SCHMIDT","hireswidth":2400,"hiresheight":3000,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/3f/a3fc4854-ea99-5cc2-b074-0828d78ff8c8/5e30be2ddca38.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1241","height":"812","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/3f/a3fc4854-ea99-5cc2-b074-0828d78ff8c8/5f1244307ef3a.image.jpg?crop=1241%2C812%2C8%2C76&resize=1241%2C812&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/3f/a3fc4854-ea99-5cc2-b074-0828d78ff8c8/5f1244307ef3a.image.jpg?crop=1241%2C812%2C8%2C76&resize=100%2C65&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"196","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/3f/a3fc4854-ea99-5cc2-b074-0828d78ff8c8/5f1244307ef3a.image.jpg?crop=1241%2C812%2C8%2C76&resize=300%2C196&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"670","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/3f/a3fc4854-ea99-5cc2-b074-0828d78ff8c8/5f1244307ef3a.image.jpg?crop=1241%2C812%2C8%2C76&resize=1024%2C670&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":10,"commentID":"a39bda1d-0551-5504-b041-a05d7e655ecd","body":"

Today's sermonette is my last offering as a full-time employee of Lee Enterprises, ending a 35-year career.

It's good. Seriously, all is well.

Going forward, I'll write an every-other-week column for the Dispatch-Argus and the Quad-City Times. As a correspondent, I'll forfeit my office, parking space and key to the executive bathroom. Just kidding, there's no executive bathroom.

I have another job, but life will be different. You just don't work this business, you live it. It's 24 hours, seven days a week. If something happens and you are out with family or friends, you instinctively chase the news in front of you. The mob's got nothing on my business. I should have left long ago, but once it gets its hooks into you...

Save for one person, I have enjoyed everyone I have worked with in my three-and-one-half decades as an ink-stained scribe.

For the aforementioned 35 years, I have had the two greatest jobs on the face of the earth, sportswriter and columnist.

I have shared many times what it was like to write sport for one's hometown newspaper and then -- for 27 years -- have the top writing job with what turned out to be three papers in the end. Let's be honest, fortunate doesn't even begin to describe my career.

Along the way, I have slithered with some snakes and wallowed with worms; shared rooms with presidents, lunched with a duchess, interviewed countless sporting legends and was afforded entrance to places some people only dream of going. I haven't, and will not, sit in a regular seat at any gathering.

Ever.

My greatest vomit in life came after 45 minutes of hanging with the famous Blue Angels, cruising at 900 mph at 35,000 feet. Big stuff for the guy that gets sick on the merry go-round. That's how cool this gig has been.

More importantly, I was entrusted to share stories of folks doing good, which are the best to write. I have also seen people struggling, some in their darkest hours, some at their final resting spot. I have not seen it all, but close.

Like most jobs, there have been days that try one's patience or brings us to frustration, but nothing, not one single incident ever made me want to close my office door and not come back the next day. Not death, not destruction, sickness, pandemic or those annoying, pain-in-my-backside Chicago Cubs of 2016. But, with every 2016 memory of the dastardly Northsiders, I recall my all-time hero wearing the walk-man in 2003. God bless, you Steve Bartman.

The man who hired me 35 years ago once told me: \"You spin a good yarn, kid.'' And I do/did/have, and will continue to do so, but not three times weekly like I have for nearly three decades. Twice a month is plenty.

The list of people who made my career possible is lengthy and gratitude filled from my end.

* Besides my amazing wife, Tonya, and the world's best son, Shoeless, I would have been dead if not for Gary and Diane Hird, who saw enough -- despite my shortcomings as a drunk -- to invest time and care in helping me get sober almost 36 years ago. Saints, both of them.

I will forever be in their debt.

* There is my father-in-law, Jim Tappa, Sr., who has read every word I ever penned and steadfastly stood in my corner -- no matter who I angered in print and on the baseball diamond. I cannot thank him enough. He treated me as a son long before his daughter captured my heart.

* And Jim Meenan, who gave me the chance to be a full-time sportswriter, who mentored me and remains one of my dearest friends in the business. He is a wonderful man of character.

* The finest newsman I know is Jerry Taylor, the retired publisher of The Dispatch and the Rock island Argus. I respect him as much as my late father and my father-in-law, which is the highest compliment I can pay. He is still \"Mr. Taylor'' to me. The world would be a much better place if it carried itself like him.

* Gerry Huiskamp, arguably the best husband and father I know, never backed away from me when I was floundering in life. Never. Then, when I got sober, he backed me as much with his personal support in life than any dollar amount I borrowed from his banks. I only wish I can be half the husband he is.

It does not stop there:

As I see it, the world needs more people like Chris Lemon, Kevin Corrigan, Darrel Reynolds, Jim and Joanne Sanders, Dan and Kelly Burich, Greg and Tree Dwyer, Bill and Donna Obenauf (Michaels), Jason Foy, Dan Pearson, Laura Yeater, the late Laura Fraembs, Terry and Donna Herbig, Kory Kuffler, Joe Pay, P. J. and Molly Foley, Dave Wrath, Kate Hasson, Grey Giovanine, Jim and Joe Murphy, Thom Cornelis, Steve Layer, Ben Layer, Eric Sacia, Mike Horsfield, Mike Osler, Darren and Jackie Phelps, Scott and Shannon Harding, Marc and Amy DeMarlie, Chad Humphrey, Jerry and Robbe Burkhead, Mike, Jim, Roger and Lynn VanDeHeede, Gary Hendren, Bill Healy (Sr. and Jr.), Liz Boardman, Matt Christensen, Jeff and Tom Rusk, John Scally, Pace Bennett, John Barrett, Matt Stern, Kevin Hird, Jeff Collins, Don, Justin and Jeremy Hauer, Tyson Blaser, Chris Senatra, the late Jimmy Appleman, Thom Sigel, Mike and Meghan Welch, Gary and Lara Hodge, Tony and Cheryl Carpita, Steve Tappa, Jeff Wendland, Joe Engel, the late Bob DeDoncker and Duncan Reid, Ryan Webber, Steve Batterson, Dave Heller, Jim Taylor, Glen Cook, John Hoscheit, Chris Holvoet, Jim Mertens, Matt Randazzo, Joe Casillas, Jon Ketz, George McDoniel (Sr. and Jr.), Angie Peterson, Rev. Daniel Mirabelli, Kevin Rafferty, Darcie and Roger Mattecheck, Dave DeJaegher, Nate Skahill, Mike Ebner, Todd Depoorter, Mike Tracey, Pat Rangel, Dave and Julie VanDerGinst, Fred Klauke, Sara Zabloudil, Tyler Hedrick, Vic Boblett, Larry Johnsen (Sr. and Jr.), Pete Ivanic, Jamie and Katie D'Aprile, Jim Albracht, Bill Albracht, Ray Hamilton, Guy and Debby Perry, Drew DeMarlie and Rob Brooks.

I am a lucky man. Surrounded by the best people on the planet.

I cannot express the gratitude I have for 35 years of getting the chance to do something I love.

Thank you.

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CHICAGO \u2014 Union nurses at the University of Illinois Hospital have reached a tentative agreement on a four-year contract, they announced Thursday.

The contract includes a promise to hire 160 more nurses to cut down on patient loads, promises of more protective gear, hazard pay for working during the coronavirus pandemic and other guarantees, the Illinois Nurses Association said in a statement.

The move follows a weeklong strike by 800 nurses that ended Saturday morning when they went back to work without an agreement, the Chicago Sun-Times reported

The agreement still needs the approval of a majority of the approximately 1,400 union nurses in a vote Monday.

\"We are gratified to achieve this hard-fought victory after months of negotiations,\" Illinois Nurses Association President Doris Carroll said in a statement. \"The nurses were unified and strong, and it paid off in what we think is a fair contract.\"

University of Illinois Hospital officials did not immediately comment on the reported deal.

Several hundred nurses were barred from striking after a Cook County judge granted the hospital's request to keep them on the job for the care of patients.

About 3,700 other hospital employees represented by the Service Employees International Union Local 73 remain on strike. They began their strike more than a week ago, calling for better pay and more coronavirus protection.

"}, {"id":"ae789fb2-5cda-53c1-927c-fe2a221b5f25","type":"article","starttime":"1600965000","starttime_iso8601":"2020-09-24T11:30:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1601027027","sections":[{"shane_brown":"lifestyles/shane_brown"}],"flags":{"topical":"true","alert":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"SHANE BROWN: The curious case of the barred owl in the nighttime","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/shane_brown/article_ae789fb2-5cda-53c1-927c-fe2a221b5f25.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/shane_brown/shane-brown-the-curious-case-of-the-barred-owl-in-the-nighttime/article_ae789fb2-5cda-53c1-927c-fe2a221b5f25.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/shane_brown/shane-brown-the-curious-case-of-the-barred-owl-in-the-nighttime/article_ae789fb2-5cda-53c1-927c-fe2a221b5f25.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"When my garage was broken into a couple weeks ago, I wondered if I'd become one of those jumpy people constantly paranoid about safety and security. The answer? A resounding yes. Whole-heartedly. As much as I don't want to, I'm now reaching for my security camera feed every time I hear a bump in the night. And while I love my neighborhood, let's also be frank: I live in Rock Island, and there's no shortage of bumps in the night in these parts. Most of them, in fact, are caused by the three cats who graciously allow me to live in their home.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["coronavirus","squirrel","culture","human behavior","subcultures","acronyms","plur","peace","world health organization","davenport","social media","light-hearted columnist","shane brown"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"personality","images":[{"id":"86e02ecf-5b67-528b-9f67-2ea0985cd5f1","description":"Columnist Shane Brown appears to have barred owls outside his Rock Island home.","byline":"STEPHEN B. HAGER, AUGUSTANA COLLEGE","hireswidth":2048,"hiresheight":1365,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/6e/86e02ecf-5b67-528b-9f67-2ea0985cd5f1/5e2a0ac00e1ed.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1763","height":"1175","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/6e/86e02ecf-5b67-528b-9f67-2ea0985cd5f1/5f6cca3f84e51.image.jpg?resize=1763%2C1175"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/6e/86e02ecf-5b67-528b-9f67-2ea0985cd5f1/5f6cca3f84e51.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/6e/86e02ecf-5b67-528b-9f67-2ea0985cd5f1/5f6cca3f84e51.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/6e/86e02ecf-5b67-528b-9f67-2ea0985cd5f1/5f6cca3f84e51.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"e5afbab3-8d91-5caf-a4bd-812af630a34a","description":"Shane Brown, classified advertising and columnist.","byline":"TODD MIZENER / tmizener@qconline.com","hireswidth":3189,"hiresheight":3986,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5a/e5afbab3-8d91-5caf-a4bd-812af630a34a/5ef4f7419c16d.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1287","height":"1609","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5a/e5afbab3-8d91-5caf-a4bd-812af630a34a/5f10c7d73978b.image.jpg?resize=1287%2C1609"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"125","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5a/e5afbab3-8d91-5caf-a4bd-812af630a34a/5f10c7d73978b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C125"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"375","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5a/e5afbab3-8d91-5caf-a4bd-812af630a34a/5f10c7d73978b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C375"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1280","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/5a/e5afbab3-8d91-5caf-a4bd-812af630a34a/5f10c7d73978b.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1280"}}}],"revision":10,"commentID":"ae789fb2-5cda-53c1-927c-fe2a221b5f25","body":"

When my garage was broken into a couple weeks ago, I wondered if I'd become one of those jumpy people constantly paranoid about safety and security.

The answer? A resounding yes. Whole-heartedly.

As much as I don't want to, I'm now reaching for my security camera feed every time I hear a bump in the night. And while I love my neighborhood, let's also be frank: I live in Rock Island, and there's no shortage of bumps in the night in these parts. Most of them, in fact, are caused by the three cats who graciously allow me to live in their home.

One such bump in the night occurred last week. I was sitting on my couch when a sudden \"BA-DUMP\" from outside made me instinctively grab my phone and pull up the feeds from the front of my house. I'd like to say it was all quiet on the eastern front. It was, in fact, anything but quiet.

The ba-dump itself turned out to be nothing alarming, unless you were the guy driving the rusty pickup that had just nailed the pothole on my block. It's been steadily growing this summer from a minor inconvenience to what can now only be described as a gaping hell-mouth to Middle Earth.

But I instantly found myself less concerned about the ba-dump of days gone by and more with the sounds my camera was picking up live. As God is my witness, I sat there frozen for 30 seconds listening to what sounded like a tribe of angry monkeys on the roof of my house.

I'm familiar with the assorted night noises of Rock Island. People talking and laughing as they walk to the nearby gas station. Car doors closing. Trains whistling, semis honking, police sirens blaring. It's the lullaby of urban life. But these were NOT urban noises. These were prehistoric noises.

This is one of those times I'm stymied as a writer. I wish I could just play you the recording. The best I can describe, it was something akin to \"SKREE! SKREE! WHAA WHAA WHAA OWOOOOOO! WOOOOOOO! AH AH AH OOOOOO!\" And whatever it was, it was CLOSE. And it wasn't alone. At least two of these giant killer roof monkeys were chatting with one another.

Obviously when that pickup hit the pothole, it riled up whatever ancient monstrosity lives down there in the Land of the Lost, and the hellbeast had awakened. Normally, this would be an insane proposition. But in 2020, killer subterranean monsters wouldn't surprise me one bit.

We all know what a nature lover I am \u2014 specifically I love that it's outside and I'm not \u2014 but I was curious nonetheless. I found an app for my phone that promised it could \"identify ANY bird call within earshot!\" I cautiously opened my front door, stuck my phone outside and pressed record. Sure enough, within seconds, my phone informed me with confidence that I was listening to \u2014 a pigeon.

I learned something that night \u2014 specifically, I learned how easy it is to waste $3.99 on a pointless app. If that noise came from a pigeon, it's a pigeon that's evolved Pokemon-style into Pigeonizard or something. That was no pigeon. So I took the recording and threw it up on Facebook for the hivemind of my friends to analyze. Multiple theories flooded in: Owls. Crows. Owls vs. Crows. Injured turtle doves. Someone even said, \"that noise CAN'T be real. Someone's messing with you.\"

The next day, my neighborhood was quiet. The house was still standing, and I found neither the talon marks of a prehistoric pigeon nor the droppings of a dozen angry monkeys. Defeated, I thought I'd try one last recourse: Dr. Stephen Hager, from Augustana College's Department of Biology. Hager graciously agreed to listen to the recording and it only took him seconds to make a positive ID.

\"Those are definitely barred owls,\" he told me, \"and close by.\"

I may not be a man of nature, but I've watched my fair share of children's cartoons and I have pulled the string on many a Fisher-Price See 'n Say. Based on this, I can tell you with some authority that owls are supposed to politely go \"hoot.\" They are NOT supposed to go \"SKREE! SKREE! WHAA WHAA WAAAAA!\" Apparently no one told this to barred owls.

\"What you recorded that night was at least two owls caterwauling,\" Hager explained, \"which is usually associated with paired birds that sing together, presumably to strengthen their bonds of devotion.\" I'm not positive here, but that might be the professorial way of explaining that my nocturnal friends were about to get freaky-deaky in a considerably more-than-PG-13 kinda way. I may have just heard the owl equivalent of an Al Green record.

\"The raucous hoots, gurgles and shrieks probably also signal to adjacent owls about territory boundaries,\" Hager said before casually horrifying me. \"Caterwauling can also happen when owls are trying to subdue a large prey item. Any of your neighbors lose a kitty that night?\"

OH, NO. Wait\u00a0\u2014 one ... two ... and three. Whew. My adorable large prey items are all here and accounted for.

I have no issues with owls. What's not to love? They're majestic birds with huge eyes and the ability to spin their heads around like Linda Blair. But when an owl shows up at my door, it should be for one of three reasons:

The United States Forest Service could learn a thing or two from Hager. Kids might take littering WAY more seriously if Woodsy Owl showed up like, \"Hey kids, give a hoot, don't pollute \u2014 OR GOD HELP ME, I WILL EAT YOUR CAT!\"

I dunno, nothing fazes me in 2020. We're living with an invisible plague, murder hornets and hurricane winds in Iowa. Adding a few aerial cat-eating predators should be just another drop in the bucket at this point. Still, I prefer my cats safely inedible within the confines of my home. Happily, Dr. Hager tells me the best time to catch barred owls caterwauling is between 3 and 5 a.m., when I'm tucked away in bed, happy and safe in my \u2014 WAIT, WHAT WAS THAT NOISE??

\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0\u00a0 \u00a0

\u00a0\u00a0 \u00a0

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In the Jewish tradition, burials usually take place within 24 hours of death.

But Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Sept. 18, was lying in state nearly a week later Thursday at the Supreme Court where she served as justice for 27 years, and Friday at the U.S. Capitol.

\u201cEven though it generally goes against Jewish tradition, the fact that Americans will have a chance to pause in front and say thank you to her\u201d shows the depth of her legacy, said Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

While politicians heatedly debate over replacing Ginsburg on the court, others are reflecting on her life as an advocate for women's rights and how she tried to reach just decisions as a jurist, all informed by her Jewish upbringing.

The Torah, the Jewish holy scripture, stresses the pursuit of justice where the outcome and the means to it are just, Cooper said, and those beliefs were part of Ginsburg\u2019s \u201cJewish spiritual DNA.\u201d

\u201cShe lived and upheld the highest standards for a public servant,\" he said, \"for a judge, for an American, and we can say here also, with pride, for someone who is Jewish.\u201d

Ginsburg, born in 1933, spoke publicly in life about her religious foundations growing up during the Holocaust and before bat mitzvahs \u2014 coming-of-age ceremonies for girls comparable to bar mitzvahs for boys \u2014 were commonplace.

A formative moment came at age 17 when her mother died and women could not be part of the minyan, the quorum of 10 Jewish adults for the prayer service for the dead.

Ginsburg went to Harvard Law School in 1956, a time when there were few women at the institution and Jews faced discrimination. She later transferred to Columbia and graduated at the top of her class.

During a 2017 Rosh Hashana visit\u00a0to a historic synagogue in Washington, Ginsburg told worshippers she believed being Jewish helped her empathize with other minority groups. She noted that she and other Jewish justices who have served on the court have held some similar views, something she linked to their shared heritage.

\u201cThe Jewish religion is an ethical religion. That is, we are taught to do right, to love mercy, do justice, not because there\u2019s gonna be any reward in heaven or punishment in hell,\" Ginsburg told the audience. \"We live righteously because that\u2019s how people should live and not anticipating any award in the hereafter.\u201d

During the visit she also recounted what she called the \u201cGreat Yom Kippur controversy\u201d of 1995, when then-Chief Justice William Rehnquist scheduled arguments on the holiest day of the Jewish calendar. Ginsburg and Justice Stephen Breyer pointed out that doing so forced Jewish lawyers to decide between their court appearances and their religion, and Rehnquist canceled the arguments.

While\u00a0visiting Israel in 2018\u00a0to receive a lifetime achievement award from the Genesis Prize Foundation, a prominent Jewish organization, Ginsburg said she was driven by the Jewish values of pursuing justice and the concept of \u201ctikkun olam,\u201d or repairing the world.

\u201cI am a judge, born, raised and proud of being a Jew. The demand for justice, for peace, for enlightenment runs through the entirety of Jewish history and Jewish tradition,\u201d she said at the award ceremony. \u201cI hope, in all the years I have the good fortune to continue serving on the bench of the Supreme Court of the United States, I will have the strength and courage to remain steadfast in the service of that demand.\"

Ginsburg understood what it meant for people to be excluded and \u201cothered\u201d and fought against that, said Sheila Katz, CEO of the National Council of Jewish Women.

\u201cIt is because of Justice Ginsburg that today women have the equal protection of the law and that ideas that seemed radical are common sense because of her,\u201d Katz said. \u201cI believe that her Jewish identity played a critical role in her values and in the way she went about being a judge. ... She has said that.\u201d

But Ginsburg\u2019s focus extended beyond Jewish women, Katz noted: \u201cShe operated on the bench to make things better for everyone, and that\u2019s what her legacy is.\u201d

Farhana Khera, executive director of the civil rights organization Muslim Advocates, said in a statement that Ginsburg was \u201ca tireless defender of our nation\u2019s promise of freedom, justice and equality for all \u2014 truly all. So much of what I do as a civil rights advocate, an attorney, a woman, a Muslim and as an American is possible because of what she accomplished.\u201d

Speaking at Ginsburg\u2019s memorial service Wednesday, Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt, of the Adas Israel Congregation in Washington, D.C., said, \"the Torah is relentless in reminding and instructing and commanding that we never forget those who live in the shadows.\u201d She said that concept is written into the U.S. Constitution and it was Ginsburg\u2019s life work to insist the document deliver on that promise. Ginsburg, Hotzblatt said, \u201ccarried out that work in every chapter of her life.\u201d

Rabbi Sam Levine of the East Midwood Jewish Center in Brooklyn, New York, Ginsburg's childhood congregation, said there is a clear link between Jewish teachings and her life's work.

\u201cThere really is a direct correlation between what we teach, what we think about, what we study as a community and the life that she lived,\u201d he said.

"}, {"id":"fe37b064-7eb9-5906-99a9-5363d2651d7d","type":"article","starttime":"1600862400","starttime_iso8601":"2020-09-23T07:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1601077203","priority":0,"sections":[{"faith-and-values":"lifestyles/faith-and-values"},{"lee-wire":"lee-wire"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Father Altman stands by previous message denouncing Catholic Democrats in new video","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/faith-and-values/article_fe37b064-7eb9-5906-99a9-5363d2651d7d.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/faith-and-values/father-altman-stands-by-previous-message-denouncing-catholic-democrats-in-new-video/article_fe37b064-7eb9-5906-99a9-5363d2651d7d.html","canonical":"https://lacrossetribune.com/news/local/father-altman-stands-by-previous-message-denouncing-catholic-democrats-in-new-video/article_230006d9-ae26-53b2-a60c-ae8e2e87f297.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Olivia Herken\nLa Crosse Tribune","prologue":"In a\u00a0new video, published by the same far-right media outlet, Father James Altman of La Crosse said he stands by his messages from\u00a0a past video\u00a0that Catholic Democrats are impostors, and adds that \"hell\" is seen in \"left wing cancel culture.\"","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"5b182c85-7fd6-56bd-bc12-aa671dad76fd","description":"Altman","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"150","height":"200","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b1/5b182c85-7fd6-56bd-bc12-aa671dad76fd/5f6e633cb6743.image.jpg?resize=150%2C200"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"133","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b1/5b182c85-7fd6-56bd-bc12-aa671dad76fd/5f6e633cb6743.image.jpg?resize=100%2C133"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"400","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b1/5b182c85-7fd6-56bd-bc12-aa671dad76fd/5f6e633cb6743.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1365","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b1/5b182c85-7fd6-56bd-bc12-aa671dad76fd/5f6e633cb6743.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"fe37b064-7eb9-5906-99a9-5363d2651d7d","body":"
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In a new video, Father James Altman of La Crosse said he stands by his messages from a past video\u00a0that Catholic Democrats are impostors, and adds that \"hell\" is seen in \"left wing cancel culture.\"

\"At this moment, allow me to respond to what has become somewhat of an intense, often belligerent reaction to a recent, and simply-stated truth: You cannot be Catholic and be a Democrat,\" he said, calling his original video \"beautiful,\" and praising the number of views it got from around the world.

The original video made by Altman, the priest at St. James the Less in La Crosse, and produced by Alpha News MN, a far-right media outlet, received a massive response from people all over the country, and even some parts of the globe.

In the original video from August, Altman said any Catholic Democrats would be facing the fires of hell, and repeated common right-wing talking points against climate change, Planned Parenthood, Black Lives Matter and more. In his new video, he said that his statement was a \"no-brainer.\"

The Diocese of La Crosse denounced the video shortly after it was made popular, and said it would start by simply counseling Altman, but that if the issue is not resolved, official punishment could be handed down.

Altman largely ignores that warning in this new video, though, not wavering from his original message and defending that it was not divisive our out of line.

The Diocese has not yet issued a response to Altman's newest video, and did not immediately respond to the Tribune for comment.

In this new video, titled, \"Liberal Catholics are Wolves in Sheep's Clothing,\" which is quoting 19th Century Pope Pius X, Altman stands by his original message, and takes a sharper aim by denouncing what he calls left-wing cancel culture, saying he's victim to it.

\"I've heard it so many times I can't count,\" he said, \"the church has just done a poor job catechizing. But of course then, when someone tries, as we've seen, all hell breaks loose. We've seen the hell in the left wing cancel culture.\"

\"Thank you to the left wing bullies, the cancel culture, for just bringing yourselves into the light of day. Not that we didn't already know,\" Altman said.

\"The

Altman

He specifically speaks out against protesters again in this video, specifically ones that have been escalated to violence, saying they are an example of cancel culture.

\"Evil preaches tolerance until it is dominant. Then it seeks\u00a0 to silence the good. That's our cancel culture. Every rioter, looter, burner, shooter or participant in the cancel culture is another attempt to establish through bullying, oppressive and intolerant socialist attitude,\" he said, quoting the Archbishop Charles Chaput.

Many have denounced Altman's first video as being too divisive, including the Diocese, but Altman said it is within his right as a priest to choose a political party or platform and preach that to his parish, as an act of \"charity.\"

\"The video was not divisive. The division already is real, the video only was honestly bringing that elephant into the room,\" he said. \"But can we do that? Can we speak to moral issues in the public sphere?\"

\"Not only can we, as promised by our Constitution, and is explicitly supported by President Trump, we must. We must,\" Altman added.

Altman also responded to criticisms that his tone was too divisive or angry.

Catholic community feeling divided and angry over aftermath of La Crosse priest video

\"Dear family, that is exactly why the proposition that shepherds of the church must be somehow be like wimps in their language, that somehow we must worry about offending anyone with our manner and our tone, is not now, and never has been, the be-all-end-all of Catholic preaching,\" he said.

And again, Altman stands by his words that Catholic Democrats will face retribution in the Christian afterlife for their political and religious relationship.

\"Anyone can however erroneously complain about my manner, or tone or divisiveness in the video, well good luck. Good luck when you get to the gates of heaven,\" he said, saying certain leaders of the religion will be standing there waiting.

\"And you will get crushed in a sandwich of truth,\" he said.

Altman could not be immediately reached for comment on this story.

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Vote early and vote often.\"It's only embarrassing if you care what people think,'' is the best advice I received in years.A woman saying, \"I'm not mad at you,'' is like the dentist saying, \"You won't feel a thing.''\u00a0 (A buddy over coffee).I caught my son pouring the milk before the cereal. He now lives with an alien family that understands.Every group has that one dude who asks \u2014 every time you are out \u2014 what craft beers are on tap and what kind of salad dressing the eatery offers. The same dude that orders a Bud Light and thousand island dressing.Do not blame Mitch Trubisky Bears fans, blame the dude with the headset.You can put a dozen different fruits in a smoothie, but if you put one banana in that smoothie, it becomes a banana smoothie.A bee is willing to end its life just to cause you a measured degree of pain. We all have someone in our lives like that.\"If 2020 were a drink, it would be a colonoscopy prep.'' (A guy behind me at a high school football game Saturday past.)The late Jack Wheeler might have been the nicest, most helpful high school coach I ever ran across in my years in this business. Wheeler, who passed last week, will be missed by many.Only in 2020 would going to Walgreen's for a flu shot with my wife be considered date night.Some people should not be notified when this quarantine this is over.I must be the only person it bothers that kids go to bed hungry and without shelter, but there is millions of dollars spent by PACs and candidate committees on senseless and untrue political ads. You would think Joni Ernst has a corrupt third eye on her forehead and Theresa Greenfield has a second nose that was paid for by dark money. If you have enough money, you can pretty much put what you want on a radio or TV ad. Make it stop!Semis win all ties, I get that. But I pay just as much in taxes as the dude who cuts me off \u2014 because he wants to pass another truck at 68 mph on a 70 mph stretch of road. You don't own the road, you \u2014 like me and the others who must defer because your trucks can squash is like bugs \u2014 rent it.I want to lose just enough weight so my hand will finally fit inside the Pringles can.Saturday past, I sat next to Dennis Voy, owner of radio station KMAQ and the 61 Drive-In at Maquoketa. Voy was broadcasting a high school football game 62 years to the day he broadcast his first high school football game. Amazing.\u00a0","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["pringles","dennis voy","61 drive-in","kmaq","jack wheeler","mitch trubisky","democrats"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"fe140d09-23d6-5651-8bf6-0a86f547246f","description":"Orion volleyball head coach Jack Wheeler retired in 2019 after leading the Chargers to a 37-2 record and a sectional title. 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But how do you get that back? You get it back by practicing hard, by actually getting tighter. That's the message we've had is 'get tighter.' Believe in one another. Keep trusting.\"","byline":"TONY AVELAR, AP","hireswidth":1500,"hiresheight":2764,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3d/33d4d84f-bdf5-5c98-ae39-b53914887f4b/5f6a6d904be36.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1060","height":"1953","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3d/33d4d84f-bdf5-5c98-ae39-b53914887f4b/5f6a6d90347d9.image.jpg?resize=1060%2C1953"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"184","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3d/33d4d84f-bdf5-5c98-ae39-b53914887f4b/5f6a6d90347d9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C184"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"553","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3d/33d4d84f-bdf5-5c98-ae39-b53914887f4b/5f6a6d90347d9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C553"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1887","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3d/33d4d84f-bdf5-5c98-ae39-b53914887f4b/5f6a6d90347d9.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1887"}}},{"id":"a3fc4854-ea99-5cc2-b074-0828d78ff8c8","description":"John Marx, columnist/reporter, Quad-City Times, Dispatch-Argus","byline":"KEVIN E. 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To the best of my knowledge:

"}, {"id":"56001014-e6b0-5972-a98d-156a2135e84e","type":"article","starttime":"1600784580","starttime_iso8601":"2020-09-22T09:23:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1601069943","sections":[{"faith-and-values":"lifestyles/faith-and-values"}],"flags":{"topical":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Our Lady of Guadalupe Church to hold fall dinner/raffle","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/faith-and-values/article_56001014-e6b0-5972-a98d-156a2135e84e.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/faith-and-values/our-lady-of-guadalupe-church-to-hold-fall-dinner-raffle/article_56001014-e6b0-5972-a98d-156a2135e84e.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/faith-and-values/our-lady-of-guadalupe-church-to-hold-fall-dinner-raffle/article_56001014-e6b0-5972-a98d-156a2135e84e.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"STAFF","prologue":"Our Lady of Guadalupe Church will hold a curbside fall dinner from 4-6:30 p.m., Nov. 7. The dinner includes a traditional turkey dinner with pie. Tickets cost $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 4-12. For reservations, call Prudy at 309-792-3867, extension 5, by Oct. 25, or mail a check to the church,\u00a0800 17th St., Silvis, and tickets will be mailed to you.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":6,"commentID":"56001014-e6b0-5972-a98d-156a2135e84e","body":"

Our Lady of Guadalupe Church will hold a curbside fall dinner from 4-6:30 p.m., Nov. 7.

The dinner includes a traditional turkey dinner with pie. Tickets cost $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 4-12.

For reservations, call Prudy at 309-792-3867, extension 5, by Oct. 25, or mail a check to the church,\u00a0800 17th St., Silvis, and tickets will be mailed to you.

Face coverings and social distancing are required.

Raffle tickets are also available for the more than 75 baskets to be given away Oct. 29.Tickets cost $1 each, six for $5, or an arm's length for $20. Need not be present to win, but please use your own pen to sign the tickets.

For times and questions about the raffles, call Adeline Harvey at 309-792-9207 or Rosemary Vittori at 309-737-8002.

"}, {"id":"a784f80c-198c-59c6-9e71-e6b72d612266","type":"article","starttime":"1600664400","starttime_iso8601":"2020-09-21T00:00:00-05:00","sections":[{"health-med-fit":"lifestyles/health-med-fit"}],"flags":{"topical":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"START THE WEEK OFF RIGHT: Experience safe care and convenience at UnityPoint Clinic","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/article_a784f80c-198c-59c6-9e71-e6b72d612266.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/start-the-week-off-right-experience-safe-care-and-convenience-at-unitypoint-clinic/article_a784f80c-198c-59c6-9e71-e6b72d612266.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/start-the-week-off-right-experience-safe-care-and-convenience-at-unitypoint-clinic/article_a784f80c-198c-59c6-9e71-e6b72d612266.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"MATTHEW BEHRENS\nUnityPoint Clinic regional vice president","prologue":"The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic brings many questions of safety into our daily lives, including medical appointments that are important to our health. You probably think about your own safety when running errands or going to appointments in ways you never thought about before the pandemic began. UnityPoint Clinic has been working hard from the beginning, developing enhanced safety measures and more streamlined processes to make sure every person who trusts us with their care feels safe. We want you to know that when you come in for an appointment or walk-in for care, we are doing everything we can to make sure your health is protected.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["trinity","cooking with heart"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"e1e2b624-a1e2-56e7-8e29-e585c761c5d5","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":1500,"hiresheight":2100,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/1e/e1e2b624-a1e2-56e7-8e29-e585c761c5d5/5f64e39796999.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1216","height":"1703","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/1e/e1e2b624-a1e2-56e7-8e29-e585c761c5d5/5f64e39763a9c.image.jpg?resize=1216%2C1703"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"140","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/1e/e1e2b624-a1e2-56e7-8e29-e585c761c5d5/5f64e39763a9c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C140"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"420","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/1e/e1e2b624-a1e2-56e7-8e29-e585c761c5d5/5f64e39763a9c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C420"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1434","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/1e/e1e2b624-a1e2-56e7-8e29-e585c761c5d5/5f64e39763a9c.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1434"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"a784f80c-198c-59c6-9e71-e6b72d612266","body":"

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic brings many questions of safety into our daily lives, including medical appointments that are important to our health.

You probably think about your own safety when running errands or going to appointments in ways you never thought about before the pandemic began. UnityPoint Clinic has been working hard from the beginning, developing enhanced safety measures and more streamlined processes to make sure every person who trusts us with their care feels safe. We want you to know that when you come in for an appointment or walk-in for care, we are doing everything we can to make sure your health is protected.

UnityPoint Clinic \u2013 Express launched last year with a brand new, streamlined model of walk-in care. We created a system that allows you to get quick and convenient care in around 30 minutes, even without an appointment reservation. This concierge-style approach is meant to make walk-in care faster and more personal in the busy world we live in. When the pandemic began, we knew we would need to take this approach even further to protect everyone\u2019s safety and peace of mind about getting the care they need.

Since March, we have had several processes in place to ensure that your contact with others is limited and the time you spend at our clinic locations is reduced. At some clinics, we are utilizing a virtual waiting room, which allows you to wait in your vehicle for your appointment instead of the waiting room. A simple call or text message then lets you know that your provider is ready to see you and that your exam room has been cleaned and is ready for your appointment. In other locations, lobbies are set up to allow for safe social distancing and all registering is performed behind plexiglass.

Masks are required at all UnityPoint Clinic locations and we will provide masks and hand sanitizer for those who need them. For added convenience, you can Reserve Your Spot at any of our Express or Express Care locations at unitypoint.org. This allows you to pick a time that is convenient for you which also reduces any time spent in the waiting room. Reserve Your Spot is a great tool that makes prioritizing your health easy to fit into your schedule.

UnityPoint Clinic will continue to do its part to make sure you experience safe care, your way. We understand the pandemic is creating confusion, concerns and fears, but you can rest assured that UnityPoint Clinic is doing everything they can to keep you and the community safe.

To find a walk-in clinic near you or to Reserve Your Spot, visit unitypoint.org/quadcities/get-care-now.

"}, {"id":"8a44801c-4a6d-5786-b676-27f4669906ea","type":"article","starttime":"1600623060","starttime_iso8601":"2020-09-20T12:31:00-05:00","sections":[{"home-and-garden":"lifestyles/home-and-garden"}],"flags":{"topical":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Fall is good time to plant native perennials","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/article_8a44801c-4a6d-5786-b676-27f4669906ea.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/fall-is-good-time-to-plant-native-perennials/article_8a44801c-4a6d-5786-b676-27f4669906ea.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/fall-is-good-time-to-plant-native-perennials/article_8a44801c-4a6d-5786-b676-27f4669906ea.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS EXTENSION","prologue":"\u00a0Retailer shortages of the most popular native perennial plants were common this spring as there was an unprecedented run on supplies. But fall is another great opportunity to plant, says Austin Little, University of Illinois Extension horticulture educator. Herbaceous natives like butterfly milkweed or echinacea from transplants can be planted in the spring. However, Little says planting in fall has a few more benefits, such as improved establishment and flowering in the following spring, better vigor, and greater weed suppression.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["home-garden"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"7d8d5f23-04c8-57e3-b783-cdb4ee9dbf50","description":"Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) tolerates dry soils in sunny locations. It also provides larval food for monarch butterfly caterpillars. And the bright orange flowers land a punch of vivid color to one's yard.","byline":"QUAD-CITY TIMES FILE PHOTO","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"600","height":"519","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/d8/7d8d5f23-04c8-57e3-b783-cdb4ee9dbf50/5f50138b80acc.image.jpg?resize=600%2C519"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"87","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/d8/7d8d5f23-04c8-57e3-b783-cdb4ee9dbf50/5f50138b80acc.image.jpg?resize=100%2C87"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"260","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/d8/7d8d5f23-04c8-57e3-b783-cdb4ee9dbf50/5f50138b80acc.image.jpg?resize=300%2C260"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"886","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/d8/7d8d5f23-04c8-57e3-b783-cdb4ee9dbf50/5f50138b80acc.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"4433a1eb-0bcb-5211-9167-b9496ba4a854","description":"Purple coneflower can be planted in fall. \u00a0\u00a0","byline":"CONTRIBUTED PHOTO","hireswidth":960,"hiresheight":1280,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/43/4433a1eb-0bcb-5211-9167-b9496ba4a854/5f5013c64b660.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"960","height":"1280","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/43/4433a1eb-0bcb-5211-9167-b9496ba4a854/5f5013c63daae.image.jpg?resize=960%2C1280"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"133","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/43/4433a1eb-0bcb-5211-9167-b9496ba4a854/5f5013c63daae.image.jpg?resize=100%2C133"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"400","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/43/4433a1eb-0bcb-5211-9167-b9496ba4a854/5f5013c63daae.image.jpg?resize=300%2C400"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1365","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/43/4433a1eb-0bcb-5211-9167-b9496ba4a854/5f5013c63daae.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"8a44801c-4a6d-5786-b676-27f4669906ea","body":"

\u00a0Retailer shortages of the most popular native perennial plants were common this spring as there was an unprecedented run on supplies. But fall is another great opportunity to plant, says Austin Little, University of Illinois Extension horticulture educator.

Herbaceous natives like butterfly milkweed or echinacea from transplants can be planted in the spring. However, Little says planting in fall has a few more benefits, such as improved establishment and flowering in the following spring, better vigor, and greater weed suppression.

Native plants are a critical part of our ecosystems and contribute to beneficial insects, birds, wildlife and important microorganisms living in and on soils.

In the fall, soils hold onto heat longer even as above-ground temperatures are dropping, which is ideal for new root structures to grow. The root systems need time to establish new micro or feeder roots which helps the transplant to acclimate, then gradually go into dormancy as colder winter temperatures arrive. Fall transplants have better root structure and more time to acclimate to the local environment.

Herbaceous native perennials transplants or seeds can be ordered online or from a local nursery. Plugs are easier to plant and establish quicker. They need to be planted about six weeks before the first frost of fall.

In the Quad-Cities area, that is usually between Oct. 10-15.

\u201cIf direct seeding, wait until the first hard frost to apply the seed to a weed-free bed with open soil so the seedlings do not germinate prematurely,\u201d Little says.

\u201cMost native herbaceous perennials have very small seeds and need only a thin layer of soil and mulch to undergo the chilling process known as stratification.\u201d

Water. Transplants need to be thoroughly watered when they are installed. (This is especially true this year as the Quad-City area is in near drought condition.) To encourage deeper root growth, it\u2019s better to water less often but more deeply, once or twice a week for about 30 minutes depending on rain and temperature. When it\u2019s getting close to the average first frost date, Little says it\u2019s a good idea to back off on the water.

\u201cEven if it warms up a bit in late fall, it\u2019s best to hold off on watering to avoid interrupting the hardening off process,\u201d he says.

Fertilizer not needed. Fertilizing in the fall is not recommended. Many native herbaceous plants are adapted to lean and low fertility soils. Adding nitrogen and other nutrients in the fall may cause the transplant to put energy into new vegetative growth that will be damaged by winter conditions and suppress the establishment of roots. Hold off on fertilizing until early spring, Little recommends

Mulch. Do add a 2- to 3-inch layer of mulch or compost around the base of plants, making sure to leave some open space around the stems to avoid harboring unwanted pests and moisture build-up. Fall plants don\u2019t need to be mulched immediately after planting and can benefit from the sun warming the soil.

Mulching can wait until night-time temperatures are in the 32\u00b0F range. By adding mulch, such as straw or finely shredded hardwood wood, and making sure plants are well anchored in the soil, frost heaving can be avoided.

Compost. Adding fall compost around any new plants is also recommended. By spring, most of the compost will be broken down and ready to be taken up by plants with root structures that have a head start on spring transplants.

"}, {"id":"9d9e4349-9c73-5b8a-b2fb-3bb3404cfe14","type":"article","starttime":"1600612440","starttime_iso8601":"2020-09-20T09:34:00-05:00","sections":[{"home-and-garden":"lifestyles/home-and-garden"}],"application":"editorial","title":"HOME BRIEFS","url":"http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/article_9d9e4349-9c73-5b8a-b2fb-3bb3404cfe14.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/home-briefs/article_9d9e4349-9c73-5b8a-b2fb-3bb3404cfe14.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/home-briefs/article_9d9e4349-9c73-5b8a-b2fb-3bb3404cfe14.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"African violets will be for saleThe Quad-Cities African Violet Society will host a fall sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 26, at Wallace's Garden Center, 2605 Devils Glen Road, Bettendorf. A society representative says members have lots and lots of plants because they weren't able to have their spring sale due to COVID-19. Included will be unusual varieties of African violets, Streptocarpus and other gesneraids.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["qca","home-garden","sanitizer","sale","commerce","food","economics","african violet","treat","wallace","alcohol","pennsylvania"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"9d9e4349-9c73-5b8a-b2fb-3bb3404cfe14","body":"

African violets will be for sale

The Quad-Cities African Violet Society will host a fall sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 26, at Wallace's Garden Center, 2605 Devils Glen Road, Bettendorf.

A society representative says members have lots and lots of plants because they weren't able to have their spring sale due to COVID-19. Included will be unusual varieties of African violets, Streptocarpus and other gesneraids.

Members will be present to answer questions.

Wallace's asks that customers wear masks if medically possible.

For questions, email africanviolets@yahoo.com

Center hosts plant sale

The Quad-City Botanical Center is hosting a plant sale from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 26, with houseplants, plants from the greenhouse, a small selection of bulbs and pots, and featured plant consignors.

The center is at 2525 4th Ave., Rock Island.

Guests are required to wear a mask inside the building at all times and are highly encouraged to wear a mask outdoors.

In addition, the center is selling spring flower bulbs online through Oct. 15. To order, go to qcgardens.com. Bulbs will ship to your address.

No Peeps for Halloween, Christmas

BETHLEHEM, Pa. \u2014 Peeps treats are going on hiatus for several months,\u00a0 another consequence of the coronavirus pandemic.

Just Born Quality Confections said it won’t be producing treats for  Halloween, Christmas or Valentine’s Day as the Bethlehem, Pennsylvania-based company prepares for what it expects to be an \"overwhelming demand\" for its candies next Easter, PennLive.com reports.

Just Born, which has been in business since 1923, said its other seasonal confections are expected to return to store shelves by Halloween 2021.

Canning gear sparse in some places

MARSHFIELD, Vt. \u2014 A boom in gardening and preparing food at home during the coronavirus pandemic has led to a scarcity of supplies with which to preserve them in some parts of the country.

From Maine and Vermont to Louisiana and West Virginia, gardeners have reported being in a pickle when it comes to finding certain sized glass jars, the special lids to safely seal them, or the bands with which to screw them on. They\u2019ve gone from store to store and some have given in to paying higher prices online for certain precious so-called canning supplies.

The entire canning industry has seen an unprecedented demand for supplies as more consumers prepare meals at home during the pandemic, said a spokesperson for Newell Brands, owner of Ball, which produces Mason jars and other supplies.

Hand sanitizer should be mostly alcohol

What should you look for in a hand sanitizer?

Pick one that contains mostly alcohol, and has few other ingredients.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says hand sanitizers should be at least 60% ethyl alcohol or 70% isopropyl alcohol. Other approved ingredients may include sterile distilled water, hydrogen peroxide and glycerin, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

You should avoid anything with methanol or 1-propanol, both of which can be highly toxic.\u00a0

Health officials also say to avoid hand sanitizers that replace alcohol with benzalkonium chloride, which is less effective at killing certain bacteria and viruses. Making your own sanitizers isn\u2019t encouraged either; the wrong mix of chemicals can be ineffective or cause skin burns.

And you should only use hand sanitizer when you can\u2019t wash your hands with soap and water, says Barun Mathema, an infectious disease researcher at Columbia University. Hand washing is better at removing more germs.

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