[ {"id":"ea753168-1df7-5676-a249-79dfa81b0c2b","type":"collection","starttime":"1542328200","starttime_iso8601":"2018-11-15T18:30:00-06:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"flags":{"spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"10 insights on today's news that will make you smarter tomorrow","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/collection_ea753168-1df7-5676-a249-79dfa81b0c2b.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/insights-on-today-s-news-that-will-make-you-smarter/collection_ea753168-1df7-5676-a249-79dfa81b0c2b.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/insights-on-today-s-news-that-will-make-you-smarter/collection_ea753168-1df7-5676-a249-79dfa81b0c2b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":10,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Stay in the know! Browse through opinions and analysis on today's hottest topics.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":["wire"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"series","previews":[{"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a7/ea753168-1df7-5676-a249-79dfa81b0c2b/5ac6795d3024f.preview.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1764","height":"1175","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a7/ea753168-1df7-5676-a249-79dfa81b0c2b/5ac6795d3024f.preview.jpg?resize=1764%2C1175"}}],"revision":225}, {"id":"06bee102-270a-5909-a71b-56788fd172d0","type":"article","starttime":"1542267000","starttime_iso8601":"2018-11-15T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Thiessen: Macron is wrong","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/article_06bee102-270a-5909-a71b-56788fd172d0.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/thiessen-macron-is-wrong/article_06bee102-270a-5909-a71b-56788fd172d0.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/thiessen-macron-is-wrong/article_06bee102-270a-5909-a71b-56788fd172d0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Marc A. Thiessen","prologue":"When French President Emmanuel Macron denounced populist nationalism this week and called on world leaders to support institutions such as the United Nations that defend \"the common good of the world,\" liberal elites cheered. The speech was seen as a rebuke of President Trump, whose opposition to \"globalism\" and embrace of \"nationalism\" are held up as signs of the decay of American conservatism and U.S. global leadership. Sorry, but American conservatives were opposing the globalist project long before Trump arrived on the scene. Back in the early 1990s, President Bill Clinton's soon-to-be deputy secretary of state, Strobe Talbott, said openly that \"all countries are basically social arrangements \u2026 [that] are all artificial and temporary.\" He added, \"Within the next hundred years \u2026 nationhood as we know it will be obsolete; all states will recognize a single global authority.\" Conservatives, as opposed to liberals such as Talbott, don't see America as a temporary social arrangement. They recognize the march toward supranational global authority as fundamentally undemocratic, because it represents a growing concentration of power in the hands of unelected bureaucrats presiding over unaccountable institutions further and further removed from the people affected by their decisions. As Nobel Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman explained in his 1962 classic, \"Capitalism and Freedom\": \"If government is to exercise power, better in the county than in the state, better in the state than in Washington,\" because \"if I do not like what my local community does \u2026 I can move to another local community. If I do not like that my state does, I can move to another. If I do not like what Washington imposes, I have few alternatives in this world of jealous nations.\" Where, exactly, is one supposed to move when one does not like what global institutions impose? American conservatives believe in international cooperation to address common challenges. But they refuse to cede American sovereignty to supranational institutions, or to see America tied down with thousands of Lilliputian threads spun out of treaties and institutions that constrain her freedom of action. They understand that what stopped the march of Nazism and Communism in the 20th century was not international law but the principled projection of power by the world's democracies led by a sovereign United States. And what prevents China from invading Taiwan, or North Korea from attacking South Korea, today is not fear of U.N. censure but fear of the U.S. military. A strong America is the only guarantor of world peace. That's why President George W. Bush withdrew from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty and refused to join the International Criminal Court, and why President Trump is withdrawing from pacts such as the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty today. There is also nothing inherently wrong with populism. American conservatives have always been populists, because we believe that millions of individuals can make better decisions about their own lives than a cadre of elite central planners ever could. As the founder of the modern conservative movement, William F. Buckley Jr., famously declared, \"I should sooner live in a society governed by the first two thousand names in the Boston telephone directory than in a society governed by the \u2026 faculty members of Harvard University.\" American conservatives have always been nationalists, but while European nationalism is based on \"blood and soil,\" ours is a creedal nationalism built on an idea -- the idea of human freedom. That is why America can make the audacious claim that we are an \"exceptional\" nation. While a family of immigrants can live in France for generations and still not be accepted as \"French,\" when immigrants jump into the Great American Melting Pot they become indistinguishable from any other American within a generation. European nationalism is inherently exclusive; American nationalism is inherently inclusive. And there are millions across the world who are already Americans in their hearts, even though they have not arrived here yet. The problem we face today is not the rise of populism or nationalism. It is that the bigots of the alt-right are seeking to foist European-style blood-and-soil nationalism on to the American body politic. It won't work, because blood-and-soil nationalism is inimical to our founding principles. The Declaration of Independence says that \"all men\" -- not all \"Americans\" or all \"citizens\" -- \"are created equal.\" America has no \"Volk.\" The American body politic will reject the false nationalism of the alt-right like the foreign virus that it is. But it does not follow that we must also reject American-style nationalism or embrace the globalist project. If that does not please, Monsieur Macron, tant pis!","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"dbd37bf4-9b09-5dc7-9a58-6b64c74db964","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"904","height":"901","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/bd/dbd37bf4-9b09-5dc7-9a58-6b64c74db964/5a73804b695ca.image.jpg?resize=904%2C901"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"100","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/bd/dbd37bf4-9b09-5dc7-9a58-6b64c74db964/5a73804b695ca.image.jpg?resize=100%2C100"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"299","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/bd/dbd37bf4-9b09-5dc7-9a58-6b64c74db964/5a73804b695ca.image.jpg?resize=300%2C299"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1021","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/bd/dbd37bf4-9b09-5dc7-9a58-6b64c74db964/5a73804b695ca.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"06bee102-270a-5909-a71b-56788fd172d0","body":"

When French President Emmanuel Macron denounced populist nationalism this week and called on world leaders to support institutions such as the United Nations that defend \"the common good of the world,\" liberal elites cheered. The speech was seen as a rebuke of President Trump, whose opposition to \"globalism\" and embrace of \"nationalism\" are held up as signs of the decay of American conservatism and U.S. global leadership.

Sorry, but American conservatives were opposing the globalist project long before Trump arrived on the scene.

Back in the early 1990s, President Bill Clinton's soon-to-be deputy secretary of state, Strobe Talbott, said openly that \"all countries are basically social arrangements \u2026 [that] are all artificial and temporary.\" He added, \"Within the next hundred years \u2026 nationhood as we know it will be obsolete; all states will recognize a single global authority.\" Conservatives, as opposed to liberals such as Talbott, don't see America as a temporary social arrangement. They recognize the march toward supranational global authority as fundamentally undemocratic, because it represents a growing concentration of power in the hands of unelected bureaucrats presiding over unaccountable institutions further and further removed from the people affected by their decisions.

As Nobel Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman explained in his 1962 classic, \"Capitalism and Freedom\": \"If government is to exercise power, better in the county than in the state, better in the state than in Washington,\" because \"if I do not like what my local community does \u2026 I can move to another local community. If I do not like that my state does, I can move to another. If I do not like what Washington imposes, I have few alternatives in this world of jealous nations.\" Where, exactly, is one supposed to move when one does not like what global institutions impose?

American conservatives believe in international cooperation to address common challenges. But they refuse to cede American sovereignty to supranational institutions, or to see America tied down with thousands of Lilliputian threads spun out of treaties and institutions that constrain her freedom of action. They understand that what stopped the march of Nazism and Communism in the 20th century was not international law but the principled projection of power by the world's democracies led by a sovereign United States. And what prevents China from invading Taiwan, or North Korea from attacking South Korea, today is not fear of U.N. censure but fear of the U.S. military. A strong America is the only guarantor of world peace. That's why President George W. Bush withdrew from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty and refused to join the International Criminal Court, and why President Trump is withdrawing from pacts such as the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty today.

There is also nothing inherently wrong with populism. American conservatives have always been populists, because we believe that millions of individuals can make better decisions about their own lives than a cadre of elite central planners ever could. As the founder of the modern conservative movement, William F. Buckley Jr., famously declared, \"I should sooner live in a society governed by the first two thousand names in the Boston telephone directory than in a society governed by the \u2026 faculty members of Harvard University.\"

American conservatives have always been nationalists, but while European nationalism is based on \"blood and soil,\" ours is a creedal nationalism built on an idea -- the idea of human freedom. That is why America can make the audacious claim that we are an \"exceptional\" nation. While a family of immigrants can live in France for generations and still not be accepted as \"French,\" when immigrants jump into the Great American Melting Pot they become indistinguishable from any other American within a generation. European nationalism is inherently exclusive; American nationalism is inherently inclusive. And there are millions across the world who are already Americans in their hearts, even though they have not arrived here yet.

The problem we face today is not the rise of populism or nationalism. It is that the bigots of the alt-right are seeking to foist European-style blood-and-soil nationalism on to the American body politic. It won't work, because blood-and-soil nationalism is inimical to our founding principles. The Declaration of Independence says that \"all men\" -- not all \"Americans\" or all \"citizens\" -- \"are created equal.\" America has no \"Volk.\" The American body politic will reject the false nationalism of the alt-right like the foreign virus that it is.

But it does not follow that we must also reject American-style nationalism or embrace the globalist project. If that does not please, Monsieur Macron, tant pis!

"}, {"id":"74f45108-0892-5027-8568-9e0284c8db25","type":"article","starttime":"1542267000","starttime_iso8601":"2018-11-15T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Ignatius: The world adapts to Trump","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/article_74f45108-0892-5027-8568-9e0284c8db25.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/ignatius-the-world-adapts-to-trump/article_74f45108-0892-5027-8568-9e0284c8db25.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/ignatius-the-world-adapts-to-trump/article_74f45108-0892-5027-8568-9e0284c8db25.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"David Ignatius","prologue":"One of the assumptions that economists sometimes use to frame their models is to specify that some variables will be held constant, a concept that's expressed with the Latin phrase ceteris paribus. We often make the same mistake in politics and foreign policy. We concentrate on our own domestic issues and assume that the rest of the world will remain fixed while we sort them out. We'll get back to you later, in 2021, say. But the world moves on. It's dynamic, not static: Erratic changes in one country produce reactions in other countries; alliances that once seemed solid become weaker and are recast; ambitious powers exploit new opportunities created by shifting dynamics; some countries rise, and others fall. Last weekend's events in Paris offered a dramatic demonstration that \"other things being equal\" is not a safe assumption. The world is moving to adapt to the reality that Donald Trump is president of the United States. Our friends and allies may hope his election eventually will be reversed, and maybe they think America turned a corner with the 2018 midterm elections. But they can't count on it, so these countries must consider that America may be a different country from what they had believed. French President Emmanuel Macron articulated this reality last week. In one of his World War I remembrances, he told a French radio station that Europe needs a \"true European army\" at a time when America is a less-reliable ally. \"We have to protect ourselves with respect to China, Russia and even the United States of America,\" Macron said. Trump blasted Macron's comments as \"very insulting,\" and he continued to complain in tweets Tuesday about French ingratitude and claimed Macron was trying to distract from his \"very low\" approval ratings. But joining Macron Tuesday was German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who told the European parliament that she shared others' view that \"a common European army would show the world that there would never again be war in Europe.\" Trump set the NATO alliance wobbling from the day he took office, raising doubts about America's continued readiness to pay for other countries' defense. Europeans spent a year trying to make nice, but they seem to have gotten the message. American isn't a fully reliable protector anymore. Europeans do indeed have to take greater responsibility for their defense -- and depend less on a U.S.-led NATO. What Trump has done is folly, in my view, but it's precisely what he wanted. The world is moving on, in other ways, from Trump's \"America First\" idea of U.S. power. Macron announced Monday the \"Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace.\" The document proposed a basic code of conduct to prevent meddling in elections and other malicious hacking. It was backed by more than 50 countries, 90 nonprofits and 130 private companies, including Microsoft, Google, Facebook and IBM. Absent from the list was the U.S. -- along with Russia, China, Iran and Israel. Nice: The big five of cyberwar. But the \"Paris Call\" alliance of countries, corporations and NGOs will probably move forward on cyberspace -- just as a similar global coalition has remained intact to fight climate change, despite the Trump administration's refusal to participate. As Trump's America retreats from global diplomatic engagements, other opportunistic countries are stepping forward. The most obvious example is Russia. President Vladimir Putin may hold a weak hand, but he's in the game. Russia talks with everyone: Israel and Iran, Saudi Arabia and Turkey, the Taliban and the Afghan government. Putin may be a bullyboy, but he's wearing a diplomat's striped pants -- sponsoring negotiations on Syria, Afghanistan and other issues. Once upon a time, America owned this role of global broker, but not anymore. The greatest beneficiary of Trump's retreat is China, which openly proclaims its desire to challenge U.S. global primacy. A senior Australian official told me this week that everywhere Australia looks in Asia, it sees China seeking to find potential bases for its increasingly powerful military. Australia is one of the countries that has relied upon American power, and officials still hope that's a good bet. But looking at Trump, they have to wonder. Commentators have noted that 1918 marked a global inflection point. After the horror of World War I, empires collapsed, aristocracies faded, aggrieved citizens challenged and eventually toppled the old order. Another transitional year was 1945, which began a half-century of overwhelming American global dominance. America suffered a political hiccup in 2016, electing a man who was manifestly unprepared to be president. Most of the world hopes we'll find our balance again, but in the meantime, they must consider making other arrangements.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"12464ac6-e66c-5c1c-8d82-2fe8eb6f4c7b","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"406","height":"406","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/24/12464ac6-e66c-5c1c-8d82-2fe8eb6f4c7b/5a74a4176f7b9.image.jpg?resize=406%2C406"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"100","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/24/12464ac6-e66c-5c1c-8d82-2fe8eb6f4c7b/567c762623228.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"300","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/24/12464ac6-e66c-5c1c-8d82-2fe8eb6f4c7b/5a74a4176f7b9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C300"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1024","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/24/12464ac6-e66c-5c1c-8d82-2fe8eb6f4c7b/5a74a4176f7b9.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"74f45108-0892-5027-8568-9e0284c8db25","body":"

One of the assumptions that economists sometimes use to frame their models is to specify that some variables will be held constant, a concept that's expressed with the Latin phrase ceteris paribus.

We often make the same mistake in politics and foreign policy. We concentrate on our own domestic issues and assume that the rest of the world will remain fixed while we sort them out. We'll get back to you later, in 2021, say.

But the world moves on. It's dynamic, not static: Erratic changes in one country produce reactions in other countries; alliances that once seemed solid become weaker and are recast; ambitious powers exploit new opportunities created by shifting dynamics; some countries rise, and others fall.

Last weekend's events in Paris offered a dramatic demonstration that \"other things being equal\" is not a safe assumption. The world is moving to adapt to the reality that Donald Trump is president of the United States. Our friends and allies may hope his election eventually will be reversed, and maybe they think America turned a corner with the 2018 midterm elections. But they can't count on it, so these countries must consider that America may be a different country from what they had believed.

French President Emmanuel Macron articulated this reality last week. In one of his World War I remembrances, he told a French radio station that Europe needs a \"true European army\" at a time when America is a less-reliable ally. \"We have to protect ourselves with respect to China, Russia and even the United States of America,\" Macron said.

Trump blasted Macron's comments as \"very insulting,\" and he continued to complain in tweets Tuesday about French ingratitude and claimed Macron was trying to distract from his \"very low\" approval ratings. But joining Macron Tuesday was German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who told the European parliament that she shared others' view that \"a common European army would show the world that there would never again be war in Europe.\"

Trump set the NATO alliance wobbling from the day he took office, raising doubts about America's continued readiness to pay for other countries' defense. Europeans spent a year trying to make nice, but they seem to have gotten the message. American isn't a fully reliable protector anymore. Europeans do indeed have to take greater responsibility for their defense -- and depend less on a U.S.-led NATO. What Trump has done is folly, in my view, but it's precisely what he wanted.

The world is moving on, in other ways, from Trump's \"America First\" idea of U.S. power. Macron announced Monday the \"Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace.\" The document proposed a basic code of conduct to prevent meddling in elections and other malicious hacking. It was backed by more than 50 countries, 90 nonprofits and 130 private companies, including Microsoft, Google, Facebook and IBM. Absent from the list was the U.S. -- along with Russia, China, Iran and Israel. Nice: The big five of cyberwar.

But the \"Paris Call\" alliance of countries, corporations and NGOs will probably move forward on cyberspace -- just as a similar global coalition has remained intact to fight climate change, despite the Trump administration's refusal to participate.

As Trump's America retreats from global diplomatic engagements, other opportunistic countries are stepping forward. The most obvious example is Russia. President Vladimir Putin may hold a weak hand, but he's in the game. Russia talks with everyone: Israel and Iran, Saudi Arabia and Turkey, the Taliban and the Afghan government. Putin may be a bullyboy, but he's wearing a diplomat's striped pants -- sponsoring negotiations on Syria, Afghanistan and other issues. Once upon a time, America owned this role of global broker, but not anymore.

The greatest beneficiary of Trump's retreat is China, which openly proclaims its desire to challenge U.S. global primacy. A senior Australian official told me this week that everywhere Australia looks in Asia, it sees China seeking to find potential bases for its increasingly powerful military. Australia is one of the countries that has relied upon American power, and officials still hope that's a good bet. But looking at Trump, they have to wonder.

Commentators have noted that 1918 marked a global inflection point. After the horror of World War I, empires collapsed, aristocracies faded, aggrieved citizens challenged and eventually toppled the old order. Another transitional year was 1945, which began a half-century of overwhelming American global dominance.

America suffered a political hiccup in 2016, electing a man who was manifestly unprepared to be president. Most of the world hopes we'll find our balance again, but in the meantime, they must consider making other arrangements.

"}, {"id":"f5071a09-26d6-5853-824b-a1be99b49d48","type":"article","starttime":"1542267000","starttime_iso8601":"2018-11-15T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"letters":"opinion/letters"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Whitaker a partisan jerk","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/article_f5071a09-26d6-5853-824b-a1be99b49d48.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-whitaker-a-partisan-jerk/article_f5071a09-26d6-5853-824b-a1be99b49d48.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-whitaker-a-partisan-jerk/article_f5071a09-26d6-5853-824b-a1be99b49d48.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Just so we're clear, Peter Strzok, a decorated FBI agent who dedicated his life and his career to FBI service and who for years was the head of the counterintelligence division of the FBI, who has caught many and some of the most devious Russian spies in our country, privately expressed his opinion about the election. And he was fired from his post.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"f5071a09-26d6-5853-824b-a1be99b49d48","body":"

Just so we're clear, Peter Strzok, a decorated FBI agent who dedicated his life and his career to FBI service and who for years was the head of the counterintelligence division of the FBI, who has caught many and some of the most devious Russian spies in our country, privately expressed his opinion about the election. And he was fired from his post.

Matthew Whitaker, a hyper-partisan jerk whose media firm was sued by the FTC for fraud and whose political organization was a contributing architect of the private server email scandal of Hillary Clinton\u2019s, as well as a feeder of talking points to right-wing media -- and who has many times publicly echoed Trump's words, \"no collusion\" -- and who has advised ways to dismantle the Mueller investigation in a way to get around obstruction of justice, has now been illegally promoted to Acting Attorney General overseeing said investigation.

Del Wasso

Freeport, IL

"}, {"id":"fb6a8b5b-605b-5b43-95a7-1fc3887b860f","type":"article","starttime":"1542267000","starttime_iso8601":"2018-11-15T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"letters":"opinion/letters"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: North to Alaska","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/article_fb6a8b5b-605b-5b43-95a7-1fc3887b860f.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-north-to-alaska/article_fb6a8b5b-605b-5b43-95a7-1fc3887b860f.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-north-to-alaska/article_fb6a8b5b-605b-5b43-95a7-1fc3887b860f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"There seems to be a furor over the surge of some 5,000 Hondurans fleeing \u201cintolerable\u201d conditions in Honduras to claim political asylum in the United States. Since they have declined asylum in Mexico, they are also expecting to be bused through Mexico to the U.S. border. Apparently, this is being worked out for them.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"fb6a8b5b-605b-5b43-95a7-1fc3887b860f","body":"

There seems to be a furor over the surge of some 5,000 Hondurans fleeing \u201cintolerable\u201d conditions in Honduras to claim political asylum in the United States. Since they have declined asylum in Mexico, they are also expecting to be bused through Mexico to the U.S. border. Apparently, this is being worked out for them.

How is it that the refugees have a choice in the matter? If they are truly fleeing for their lives and well-being, how do they get to be picky about which country takes them in?

Consider this solution.

When these buses arrive at a legal point of entry at our border, then let's immediately load them on our buses and transport them to a legal point of entry on the Canadian border. If Mexico can drop them at our door, then we ought to be able to drop them at Canada's.

If Canada chooses not to accept them, then they could similarly bus them to a legal point of entry with Alaska, where they might actually be welcome. Alaska could probably find room for 5,000 or so more people, and the refugees would now be in the country of their choice.

What could more possibly be more \u201cwin-win?\u201d

Steve Robinson

Davenport

"}, {"id":"ae557ac9-1505-5d20-ab0e-ce28867dead3","type":"article","starttime":"1542218151","starttime_iso8601":"2018-11-14T11:55:51-06:00","lastupdated":"1542240183","priority":0,"sections":[{"letters":"opinion/letters"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: North to Alaska","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/article_ae557ac9-1505-5d20-ab0e-ce28867dead3.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-north-to-alaska/article_ae557ac9-1505-5d20-ab0e-ce28867dead3.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-north-to-alaska/article_ae557ac9-1505-5d20-ab0e-ce28867dead3.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"North to AlaskaThere seems to be a furor over the surge of some 5,000 Hondurans fleeing \u201cintolerable\u201d conditions in Honduras to claim political asylum in the United States. Since they have declined asylum in Mexico, they are also expecting to be bused through Mexico to the U.S. border. Apparently, this is being worked out for them.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["peter strzok","politics","mexico","matthew whitaker","border","alaska","attorney general"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"ae557ac9-1505-5d20-ab0e-ce28867dead3","body":"

North to Alaska

There seems to be a furor over the surge of some 5,000 Hondurans fleeing \u201cintolerable\u201d conditions in Honduras to claim political asylum in the United States. Since they have declined asylum in Mexico, they are also expecting to be bused through Mexico to the U.S. border. Apparently, this is being worked out for them.

How is it that the refugees have a choice in the matter? If they are truly fleeing for their lives and well-being, how do they get to be picky about which country takes them in?

Consider this solution.

When these buses arrive at a legal point of entry at our border, then let\u2019s immediately load them on our buses and transport them to a legal point of entry on the Canadian border. If Mexico can drop them at our door, then we ought to be able to drop them at Canada\u2019s.

If Canada chooses not to accept them, then they could similarly bus them to a legal point of entry with Alaska, where they might actually be welcome. Alaska could probably find room for 5,000 or so more people, and the refugees would now be in the country of their choice.

What could more possibly be more \u201cwin-win?\u201d

Steve Robinson

Davenport

Whitaker a partisan jerk

Just so we\u2019re clear, Peter Strzok, a decorated FBI agent who dedicated his life and his career to FBI service and who for years was the head of the counterintelligence division of the FBI, who has caught many and some of the most devious Russian spies in our country, privately expressed his opinion about the election. And he was fired from his post.

Matthew Whitaker, a hyper-partisan jerk whose media firm was sued by the FTC for fraud and whose political organization was a contributing architect of the private server email scandal of Hillary Clinton\u2019s, as well as a feeder of talking points to right-wing media \u2014 and who has many times publicly echoed Trump\u2019s words, \u201cno collusion\u201d \u2014 and who has advised ways to dismantle the Mueller investigation in a way to get around obstruction of justice, has now been illegally promoted to acting attorney general overseeing said investigation.

Del Wasso

Freeport, IL

"}, {"id":"4e3c8e0a-ccbf-5d15-9c41-112b72d8c4f9","type":"article","starttime":"1542180600","starttime_iso8601":"2018-11-14T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"letters":"opinion/letters"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Time to reflect","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/article_4e3c8e0a-ccbf-5d15-9c41-112b72d8c4f9.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-time-to-reflect/article_4e3c8e0a-ccbf-5d15-9c41-112b72d8c4f9.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-time-to-reflect/article_4e3c8e0a-ccbf-5d15-9c41-112b72d8c4f9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"The far-left, far-right, Democrats, liberals and Republicans all need to regroup and get their acts in accordance for the good of the people. All need to put the swords away and present the olive branch. All need to understand the path of give-and-take is to be fair with all in order to have any progress in producing what is needed and equitable for the good of the people.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"4e3c8e0a-ccbf-5d15-9c41-112b72d8c4f9","body":"

The far-left, far-right, Democrats, liberals and Republicans all need to regroup and get their acts in accordance for the good of the people.

All need to put the swords away and present the olive branch. All need to understand the path of give-and-take is to be fair with all in order to have any progress in producing what is needed and equitable for the good of the people.

I am so very tired of the bickering, finger pointing, cheating, lies, hate, threats in the media and from those who represent us in government and other outside groups.

I ask you to listen to \u201cHymn to the Fallen\u201d by John Williams on YouTube. Hopefully, you may receive inspiration for changing your ways and understand why we should be thankful for those who have allowed me to write this letter to you. Do it now and share with children and grandchildren for the sake of all.

Tim Flemming

Davenport

"}, {"id":"d779f5b2-1774-5a85-9096-e7575e299c55","type":"article","starttime":"1542180600","starttime_iso8601":"2018-11-14T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"editorial":"opinion/editorial"}],"application":"editorial","title":"The land of second chances","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/editorial/article_d779f5b2-1774-5a85-9096-e7575e299c55.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/editorial/the-land-of-second-chances/article_d779f5b2-1774-5a85-9096-e7575e299c55.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/editorial/the-land-of-second-chances/article_d779f5b2-1774-5a85-9096-e7575e299c55.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Quad-City Times Editorial Board","prologue":"It took a long time for Iowa to exit from the select group of states that had failed to send a woman to Congress. U.S. Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, broke that ground in 2014, and as a result, a state that has taken pride in being in the vanguard of so many civil liberties achievements was able to leave the dubious company of Mississippi and Vermont.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":5,"commentID":"d779f5b2-1774-5a85-9096-e7575e299c55","body":"

It took a long time for Iowa to exit from the select group of states that had failed to send a woman to Congress.

U.S. Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, broke that ground in 2014, and as a result, a state that has taken pride in being in the vanguard of so many civil liberties achievements was able to leave the dubious company of Mississippi and Vermont.

Four years later, Vermont is now the only state that hasn't sent a woman to Congress. And, as we noted last week, Iowa achieved another milestone this year by electing its first women to the U.S. House of Representatives and its first woman as governor.

Still, Iowa belongs to another small club of states that we would just as soon leave.

Just Iowa and Kentucky now forbid people with felony convictions from voting.

Florida had been among the few and not-so-proud. But last week voters there approved an amendment to the state constitution to restore the right to vote to felons who have completed their sentences, including parole and probation requirements. The amendment excludes those who have committed murder or certain sexual offenses.

News reports say about 1.5 million Floridians will now have their voting rights restored.

In his 2004 State of the Union address, President George W. Bush said, \"America is the land of second chances, and when the gates of prison open, the path ahead should lead to a better life.\"

We don't know how many Floridians had his words in mind last week, but an impressive 64 percent of voters cast their ballot to do away with this restriction.

Iowa's state constitution forbids voting by people who have committed an \"infamous crime.\" Two years ago, the state Supreme Court affirmed that to mean felonies.

The Sentencing Project, which is based in Washington, D.C., and has worked for a fair and effective criminal justice system for 30 years, estimates that nearly 10 percent of Iowa's black voting age population has been disenfranchised as a result of this provision.

In all, an estimated 52,000 Iowans, or 2 percent of the voting age population, are disenfranchised.

In Florida, an estimated 10 percent of its population had been prevented from voting.

The proposal to change Florida's constitution stemmed from a petition drive that gathered the signatures of more than 1 million people. And it was an effort that had a broad cross section of political support, including from Freedom Partners, a conservative organization with close ties to Charles and David Koch.

In Iowa, unfortunately, the process of amending the constitution isn't so easy. An amendment requires a vote of two successive General Assemblies before it could even be put before the voters for ratification.

It seems unlikely that will happen.

\"In the current political climate, it is definitely a heavy lift,\" said Veronica Lorson Fowler, communications director for the ACLU of Iowa, which unsuccessfully challenged the voting restriction on felons in court a few years ago.

Still, she says the group will continue its efforts. And, she adds, there is interest among some lawmakers to redefine what constitutes an \"infamous crime.\"

We're not sure how widespread the interest is, but we hope Florida's decision might be seen as an example to follow.

We believe our state's character is in keeping with former president Bush's words: \"America is the land of second chances.\"

Forgiveness is what we plead for, and what we pledge, on Sunday at church. It is what many of us strive to practice daily.

We have now walked away from the small club of states that had failed to elect women to top statewide offices. We would be wise to also surrender our unfortunate membership in a club that still doesn't fully offer a path to a better life to those for whom the gates of prison have opened.

"} ]