[ {"id":"ea753168-1df7-5676-a249-79dfa81b0c2b","type":"collection","starttime":"1534721400","starttime_iso8601":"2018-08-19T18:30:00-05:00","priority":0,"sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"flags":{"spotlight":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"10 insights on today's news that will make you smarter tomorrow","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/collection_ea753168-1df7-5676-a249-79dfa81b0c2b.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/insights-on-today-s-news-that-will-make-you-smarter/collection_ea753168-1df7-5676-a249-79dfa81b0c2b.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/insights-on-today-s-news-that-will-make-you-smarter/collection_ea753168-1df7-5676-a249-79dfa81b0c2b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":10,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Stay in the know! Browse through opinions and analysis on today's hottest topics.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":["wire"],"internalKeywords":["#lee"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"series","previews":[{"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a7/ea753168-1df7-5676-a249-79dfa81b0c2b/5ac6795d3024f.preview.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1764","height":"1175","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a7/ea753168-1df7-5676-a249-79dfa81b0c2b/5ac6795d3024f.preview.jpg?resize=1764%2C1175"}}],"revision":137}, {"id":"881dda9c-2fb4-538b-95b4-396dcd9f6b79","type":"article","starttime":"1534669200","starttime_iso8601":"2018-08-19T04:00:00-05:00","sections":[{"editorial":"opinion/editorial"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Editorial: At least in Iowa, the courts stood with citizens","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/editorial/article_881dda9c-2fb4-538b-95b4-396dcd9f6b79.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/editorial/editorial-at-least-in-iowa-the-courts-stood-with-citizens/article_881dda9c-2fb4-538b-95b4-396dcd9f6b79.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/editorial/editorial-at-least-in-iowa-the-courts-stood-with-citizens/article_881dda9c-2fb4-538b-95b4-396dcd9f6b79.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Quad-City Times editorial board","prologue":"Courts in Iowa have had a good summer \u2014 that's if the rule of law and accountability are of any concern.\u00a0 In a pair of recent decisions, judges in Iowa stood with the fundamental rights of the public over the incessant creep of government intrusion and secrecy. In both cases, judges ignored the toxicity of American politics and, instead, committed to constitutional principles that are sorely missing throughout most of government \u2014 local, state and federal right now.\u00a0","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"long_form","images":[{"id":"65236d0f-e281-5cd9-acd0-3fed23c9860d","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2550,"hiresheight":930,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/52/65236d0f-e281-5cd9-acd0-3fed23c9860d/5b76df7196a51.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"2384","height":"869","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/52/65236d0f-e281-5cd9-acd0-3fed23c9860d/5b76df71707a2.image.jpg?resize=2384%2C869"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"36","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/52/65236d0f-e281-5cd9-acd0-3fed23c9860d/5b76df71707a2.image.jpg?resize=100%2C36"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"109","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/52/65236d0f-e281-5cd9-acd0-3fed23c9860d/5b76df71707a2.image.jpg?resize=300%2C109"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"373","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/52/65236d0f-e281-5cd9-acd0-3fed23c9860d/5b76df71707a2.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C373"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"881dda9c-2fb4-538b-95b4-396dcd9f6b79","body":"

Courts in Iowa have had a good summer \u2014 that's if the rule of law and accountability are of any concern.\u00a0

In a pair of recent decisions, judges in Iowa stood with the fundamental rights of the public over the incessant creep of government intrusion and secrecy. In both cases, judges ignored the toxicity of American politics and, instead, committed to constitutional principles that are sorely missing throughout most of government \u2014 local, state and federal right now.\u00a0

If only the same could be same for the rest of the American political landscape.

On Tuesday, a federal judge finally ended an Iowa city's crusade to suppress public records surrounding a police shooting.\u00a0

The police shooting has devolved into a downright assault on the public's right to know. Burlington and its police department have fought tooth-and-nail to suppress the release of body camera footage and records relating to the 2015 shooting of Autumn Steele. This past week's federal ruling is hugely important since state and federal lawmakers have largely balked when faced with the question of body cameras and open records. Instead, elected officials have allowed freedom of information laws to decay into near irrelevance as technology passes them by.\u00a0

But\u00a0U.S. District Court Judge James Gritzner's order,\u00a0in favor of the Iowa Public Information Council,\u00a0to release the footage and reports now stands as a litmus\u00a0test for transparency. The public's right to know supersedes\u00a0any institutional crusade toward public relations management. And it's a huge step toward realizing the promise of body cameras \u2014 made during their initial roll-out\u00a0\u2014 as a tool for accountability and not just a means of gathering evidence.\u00a0

Gritzner wasn't alone, though.\u00a0In late June, Iowa's Supreme Court made a bold stand for the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which protects against illegal search and seizure.\u00a0

In a unanimous ruling on June 29, Iowa's top justices openly chided the U.S. Supreme Court for its deference to police and tolerance for a near constant onslaught on the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which protects against illegal search and seizure. It was an important reminder that, while politics infects the highest reaches of American jurisprudence, thanks to the likes of Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman and Iowan Chuck Grassley, not all courts are infected by the diseased politics that plagues the country.\u00a0

The facts of Iowa v. Ingram were pretty straight forward. In October 2015,\u00a0Bion Ingram was pulled over in Newton because his license plate wasn't illuminated. An officer quickly realized Ingram's registration had expired and pulled him out of the car. Ingram's vehicle was towed\u00a0and searched, during which a small bag was found containing one gram of meth.

There was no warrant to search Ingram's car. And, according to incredibly lax precedent set by the U.S. Supreme Court, police officers enjoy nearly unchecked power to comb through a citizen's belongings during a traffic stop.

Not so, under Iowa's Constitution, determined state Supreme Court Justice\u00a0Brent Appel, who wrote the unanimous decision and blasted his federal counterparts in the process.\u00a0

Under federal precedent, Appel wrote, \"...law enforcement has virtually unlimited discretion to stop arbitrarily whomever they choose, arrest the driver for a minor offense that might not even be subject to jail penalties, and then obtain a broad inventory search of the vehicle \u2014 all without a warrant.\"

At least in Iowans, due process lives. That's not true everywhere, especially in the post-9/11 United States, where technology and some mythical sense of \"security\" has placed Fourth Amendment protections under greater assault than any other provision in the Bill of Rights.\u00a0

Sorry, Second Amendment crowd.\u00a0

Too often, transparency is seen as a threat by those who benefit most from the status quo. Too often, the rights of citizens are trampled by scare tactics and unsupported assertions. Too often, those with their hands on the levers of power go unchecked.

But in Iowa, those troubling trends were put on pause. And it's all due to a collection of judges who recognized the citizenry's rights are supreme.\u00a0

"}, {"id":"b53dee4b-fcd3-56be-9d20-dccfd5c3b148","type":"article","starttime":"1534662000","starttime_iso8601":"2018-08-19T02:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1534718280","sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Alexander: Why we didn't join the Globe's crusade","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/article_b53dee4b-fcd3-56be-9d20-dccfd5c3b148.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/alexander-why-we-didn-t-join-the-globe-s-crusade/article_b53dee4b-fcd3-56be-9d20-dccfd5c3b148.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/alexander-why-we-didn-t-join-the-globe-s-crusade/article_b53dee4b-fcd3-56be-9d20-dccfd5c3b148.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Jon Alexander\nEditorial Page Editor","prologue":"Neither the Boston Globe nor The New York Times speak for the Quad-City Times editorial board.\u00a0 At the end of the day, every newspaper editorial page is only as credible as its independence. As such, we opted out when editors at the Globe started recruiting other papers for a day of \"solidarity\" amid President Donald Trump's incessant attacks on the free press.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"personality","images":[{"id":"82bec63e-cf72-5b85-a998-5b198a6cb8f3","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"712","height":"470","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/2b/82bec63e-cf72-5b85-a998-5b198a6cb8f3/5a78cc9ee7f73.image.jpg?crop=712%2C470%2C1%2C282&resize=712%2C470&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"141","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/2b/82bec63e-cf72-5b85-a998-5b198a6cb8f3/567963934788e.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"198","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/2b/82bec63e-cf72-5b85-a998-5b198a6cb8f3/5a78cc9ee7f73.image.jpg?crop=712%2C470%2C1%2C282&resize=300%2C198&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"676","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/2b/82bec63e-cf72-5b85-a998-5b198a6cb8f3/5a78cc9ee7f73.image.jpg?crop=712%2C470%2C1%2C282"}}}],"revision":13,"commentID":"b53dee4b-fcd3-56be-9d20-dccfd5c3b148","body":"

Neither the Boston Globe nor The New York Times speak for the Quad-City Times editorial board.\u00a0

At the end of the day, every newspaper editorial page is only as credible as its independence. As such, we opted out when editors at the Globe started recruiting other papers for a day of \"solidarity\" amid President Donald Trump's incessant attacks on the free press.

About 350 papers, large and small, did participate, according to the Globe. Some of them were awarded a sliver of space on The New York Times' editorial page. I'm sure it was a thrill for the editorial writer at The Hazen Star, of Garrison, North Dakota, to see a couple sentences of his or her work beneath the Old Gray Lady's masthead.

But individual milestones aside, Thursday's orchestrated assault on Trump's demagoguery only bolstered his narrative. It was, and is, a loser for those of us in the news business.

Those who attack journalists call us \"the media,\" as if we're some monolith. Trumpian rhetoric paints us as a cabal, a narrative that plays well with at least a third of the country. Overall, we're accused of groupthink.

Thursday's editorial writing crusade \u2014 chock full of Thomas Jefferson quotes \u2014 fed that fiction. Trump's entire goal is to make it appear as if he's at war with journalists when, in fact, it's truth itself that he's battling. But Thursday's display of defensiveness sure made journalists look like active combatants.\u00a0

It was a mistake, and its end game remains unclear at best. In this moment, where the daily news cycle melds into a veritable blur, does anyone actually believe an organized protest will achieve anything beyond making those of us in the business feel good?\u00a0

Trump will continue to sow disdain and distrust for our craft because it works for him politically. He will continue to define us as the other, as \"enemies of the American people,\" as if our citizenship somehow counts less. His sycophants will continue to parrot it because they're cowards. His true believers will continue to lap it up because it fits nicely into their world view. Local officials will continue to adopt Trump's \"fake news\" label for reporting they don't like.

The assault on the American free press will continue. No amount of \"solidarity\" will change that. In this instance, it's more likely to make things worse.

If the \"media\" loves anything, it's writing and opining about itself \u2014 this column included. And while Trump's crusade to silence dissent and banish fact are indeed a direct assault on democracy, journalists aren't going to win over any new converts by, yet again, talking about themselves.

Sure, what we do is important. The same can be said for bureaucrats, factory workers and EMTs. Who cares? Get on with the job.\u00a0

This country recently locked a couple thousand children in cages with no plan to reunite them with their parents. White supremacists feel emboldened and supported by this White House. Pay-to-play corruption is at levels not seen in a generation. The White House is attempting to silence critics with petty punitive measures. The president of the United States is interested in his cult of personality beyond all else.

And yet, about 27 percent of the nation's newspapers decided to team up and draft heady prose about feeling bullied. Editors who took part played on the president's home turf and handed him a win.\u00a0

Branding is Trump's strength. Truth is his weakness, and it's here where journalists have the advantage \u2014 if only we could stop talking about ourselves.

"}, {"id":"9c43ff0c-ad56-52bb-8dfc-c2d126ff8bcc","type":"article","starttime":"1534661100","starttime_iso8601":"2018-08-19T01:45:00-05:00","sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Leo's corner","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/article_9c43ff0c-ad56-52bb-8dfc-c2d126ff8bcc.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/leo-s-corner/article_9c43ff0c-ad56-52bb-8dfc-c2d126ff8bcc.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/leo-s-corner/article_9c43ff0c-ad56-52bb-8dfc-c2d126ff8bcc.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Leo Kelly","prologue":"","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"5b487650-1e34-579a-9032-4560541a7aa7","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":1750,"hiresheight":1753,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b4/5b487650-1e34-579a-9032-4560541a7aa7/5b770401a6ec5.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1438","height":"1440","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b4/5b487650-1e34-579a-9032-4560541a7aa7/5b77040184ada.image.jpg?resize=1438%2C1440"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"100","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b4/5b487650-1e34-579a-9032-4560541a7aa7/5b77040184ada.image.jpg?resize=100%2C100"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"300","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b4/5b487650-1e34-579a-9032-4560541a7aa7/5b77040184ada.image.jpg?resize=300%2C300"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1025","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b4/5b487650-1e34-579a-9032-4560541a7aa7/5b77040184ada.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1025"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"9c43ff0c-ad56-52bb-8dfc-c2d126ff8bcc","body":""}, {"id":"c04a48fd-51e7-5a90-b29a-63af310ea762","type":"article","starttime":"1534660200","starttime_iso8601":"2018-08-19T01:30:00-05:00","sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Guest view: Act on House justice reform bill, Grassley","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/article_c04a48fd-51e7-5a90-b29a-63af310ea762.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/guest-view-act-on-house-justice-reform-bill-grassley/article_c04a48fd-51e7-5a90-b29a-63af310ea762.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/guest-view-act-on-house-justice-reform-bill-grassley/article_c04a48fd-51e7-5a90-b29a-63af310ea762.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Jim DeMint","prologue":"Since the resignation of Justice Anthony Kennedy from the U.S. Supreme Court in late June, most legislation in the high chamber of Congress has been in a holding pattern. Upon filling Kennedy's seat, it will fall upon senators to segue into other important matters whose deliberation is long overdue. Chief among these is criminal justice reform.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"68c896fe-1df5-5c4f-aba5-508cbf55315d","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"495","height":"319","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/8c/68c896fe-1df5-5c4f-aba5-508cbf55315d/5b7701e73aa0c.image.jpg?crop=495%2C319%2C0%2C86&resize=495%2C319&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"140","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/8c/68c896fe-1df5-5c4f-aba5-508cbf55315d/5730985be0dca.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"193","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/8c/68c896fe-1df5-5c4f-aba5-508cbf55315d/5b7701e73aa0c.image.jpg?crop=495%2C319%2C0%2C86&resize=300%2C193&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"660","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/8c/68c896fe-1df5-5c4f-aba5-508cbf55315d/5b7701e73aa0c.image.jpg?crop=495%2C319%2C0%2C86"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"c04a48fd-51e7-5a90-b29a-63af310ea762","body":"

Since the resignation of Justice Anthony Kennedy from the U.S. Supreme Court in late June, most legislation in the high chamber of Congress has been in a holding pattern. Upon filling Kennedy's seat, it will fall upon senators to segue into other important matters whose deliberation is long overdue. Chief among these is criminal justice reform.

Why criminal justice reform? For starters, a grim reality: among the roughly 650,000 people who are released from state and federal prisons annually, about two-thirds will be re-arrested within three years. It\u2019s bad enough when individuals endanger the public and commit crime in the first place, but when they are imprisoned for years\u2014at heavy taxpayer expense\u2014and released, only to commit further wrongdoing a majority of the time, this is even worse.

Correctional facilities are meant to correct behavior, but with such poor outcomes, it is apparent that this is not happening often enough. The idea behind prison reform, therefore, is simple: stop this vicious, revolving door of imprisonment and re-offense, reduce further victimization and give prisoners a better opportunity to atone and take ownership for their reformation.

To advance these goals, the Senate ought to consider the \u201cFIRST STEP\u201d Act, which recently passed the House of Representatives by an overwhelming 360-59 vote. As chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Sen. Grassley, R-Iowa, plays in important role in promoting the needed reforms in the bill.

The FIRST STEP Act, among other important elements, establishes a new risk-needs assessment to classify the risk of recidivism among federal prisoners, allowing Bureau of Prisons officials to better match them with appropriate, evidence-based programming on an individualized basis. In addition, this is coupled with $250 million in funding over five years to expand educational and rehabilitation programs, including vocation training and educational supports, substance abuse and mental health treatment, and faith-based initiatives. Various incentives can be used, especially expanded \u201cgood time\u201d credits, to promote participation in these programs.

Other pro-social reforms, such as requiring that eligible prisoners be housed within 500 driving-miles of home (when possible), and a prohibition on shackling of pregnant women during childbirth, are included as well.

Research has demonstrated that many of the reforms contained in the FIRST STEP Act can significantly reduce recidivism while saving money (in terms of lower costs to taxpayers and victims). Furthermore, conservative states such as Texas, Georgia, and Kansas have long since enacted \u201cgood-time\u201d and other prison reform policies, recognizing a simple truth: people respond to incentives. These states and others that have passed several such iterations of reform have enjoyed lower crime rates and better returns on their public expenditures. The FIRST STEP Act draws on these lessons for the federal system.

Roughly 95 percent of those who enter prison will one day rejoin our communities. Therefore, it behooves us to provide tested opportunities for prisoners to land on their feet once they do. Few better ways exist to accomplish this than by learning practical job skills in prison or receive help for an addiction and then dignifying oneself through productive work upon release. Meanwhile, employers can be more confident that applicants will have prepared themselves for release while taking responsibility for their actions. It\u2019s a win-win.

Some advocacy groups among the left are flexing their \u201cresistance\u201d muscles in opposition of the FIRST STEP Act, saying that because it lacks sentencing reform, it doesn\u2019t go far enough to amount to a meaningful effort. These claims do not match what we\u2019re hearing from inmates\u2019 families. This brand of partisan posturing may make for good electioneering, but it is a poor governing style. Most people simply want safe communities, but also wish to give people a second chance. The FIRST STEP Act will help accomplish both.

Federal prisoners and society itself could benefit right now from sensible\u2014and proven\u2014prison reform policies. Conservatives have taken the lead on this issue for over a decade in the states, and now, it\u2019s time for my former colleagues in the Senate to do the same. Pass the FIRST STEP Act.

"}, {"id":"759e4f3f-10b2-5e2e-b6d1-73d5b844d5d4","type":"article","starttime":"1534660200","starttime_iso8601":"2018-08-19T01:30:00-05:00","sections":[{"letters":"opinion/letters"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Zoo memorials were about history","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/article_759e4f3f-10b2-5e2e-b6d1-73d5b844d5d4.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-zoo-memorials-were-about-history/article_759e4f3f-10b2-5e2e-b6d1-73d5b844d5d4.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-zoo-memorials-were-about-history/article_759e4f3f-10b2-5e2e-b6d1-73d5b844d5d4.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Those plaques that were removed involved the history of Niabi Zoo. My mother Ruth Pauline Hanson spent countless hours volunteering at the zoo. Upon her death May 5, 2007, we honored her memory with a memorial bench with a plaque. My mother Ruth Pauline Mauk Lincoln Hanson was a member of this community for 86 years. Her great-grandfather Henry Meese died Dec. 6, 1890, in Moline and her grandfather William Meese was the first president of the Rock Island Historical Society in 1912.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"759e4f3f-10b2-5e2e-b6d1-73d5b844d5d4","body":"

Those plaques that were removed involved the history of Niabi Zoo. My mother Ruth Pauline Hanson spent countless hours volunteering at the zoo. Upon her death May 5, 2007, we honored her memory with a memorial bench with a plaque.

My mother Ruth Pauline Mauk Lincoln Hanson was a member of this community for 86 years. Her great-grandfather Henry Meese died Dec. 6, 1890, in Moline and her grandfather William Meese was the first president of the Rock Island Historical Society in 1912.

It is unfortunate that the Zoological Society and board are not agreeing, but why punish the families that choose to honor their loved ones. Who cares where the funds came from, the idea was to support the zoo. On July 30, when our family went to find her bench there was no plaque. How sad to think that families won't be able to sit on their loved ones' memorial benches.

Those names were more than a plaque, they represented people in our community who loved the zoo. They were the roots of the zoo. How can a community trust people who show so little respect of memorials?

I feel the community has been betrayed and fear for the future of our beloved zoo. It was like vandals taking headstones in a cemetery at night.

Roberta Prybil

Moline

"}, {"id":"f1e63491-ab27-5bfe-8421-cec73d306d2f","type":"article","starttime":"1534654800","starttime_iso8601":"2018-08-19T00:00:00-05:00","sections":[{"letters":"opinion/letters"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Lacey's raise wasn't merit based","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/article_f1e63491-ab27-5bfe-8421-cec73d306d2f.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-lacey-s-raise-wasn-t-merit-based/article_f1e63491-ab27-5bfe-8421-cec73d306d2f.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-lacey-s-raise-wasn-t-merit-based/article_f1e63491-ab27-5bfe-8421-cec73d306d2f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"While comments made by members of Davenport City Council, reported Wednesday in the Quad-City Times, made it appear as though the Civil Rights Commission does not have an annual performance merit review process for the civil rights director\u2019s salary, we in fact do. However, the action to adjust the civil rights director\u2019s salary taken at Tuesday's Civil Rights Commission meeting in Davenport was not a result of a review of performance nor was it a merit increase.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"f1e63491-ab27-5bfe-8421-cec73d306d2f","body":"

While comments made by members of Davenport City Council, reported Wednesday in the Quad-City Times, made it appear as though the Civil Rights Commission does not have an annual performance merit review process for the civil rights director\u2019s salary, we in fact do. However, the action to adjust the civil rights director\u2019s salary taken at Tuesday's Civil Rights Commission meeting in Davenport was not a result of a review of performance nor was it a merit increase.

All Davenport city employees are entitled to and receive an automatic annual cost of living adjustment \u2014 not tied to performance nor subject to review, except for the directors of the Civil Rights Commission and the library. Automatic adjustments for those two positions require counter approval by the boards that oversee those departments. It was explained quite clearly at the meeting, but not reported, that the salary adjustment approved for the director at Tuesday\u2019s meeting was that annual cost of living adjustment only and no merit raise was approved nor considered.

Both the commission and council are exploring avenues of communication to ensure that Davenport City Council members are knowledgeable about the procedures and workings of the commission to reduce misunderstandings in the future, including an informational presentation by the commission, followed by time for questions, tentatively set for 6 p.m. on Aug. 30 at the downtown Davenport Public Library.

Susan Greenwalt

Davenport

Editor's note: Greenwalt is chairwoman of the Davenport Civil Rights Commission.

"}, {"id":"4a6b969d-679c-55d2-8d3b-0523eb3c91ed","type":"article","starttime":"1534575600","starttime_iso8601":"2018-08-18T02:00:00-05:00","sections":[{"editorial":"opinion/editorial"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Editorial: Thumbs up, thumbs down","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/editorial/article_4a6b969d-679c-55d2-8d3b-0523eb3c91ed.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/editorial/editorial-thumbs-up-thumbs-down/article_4a6b969d-679c-55d2-8d3b-0523eb3c91ed.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/editorial/editorial-thumbs-up-thumbs-down/article_4a6b969d-679c-55d2-8d3b-0523eb3c91ed.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Quad-City Times editorial board","prologue":"Thumbs up to Iowa regulators for going easy on Davenport Superintendent Art Tate. Tate has spent years locked in a battle with state officials over how his district can spend reserve funds. It's largely been a proxy war about the Iowa's insufficient educational funding model as a whole. But his move to divert reserve funds this past year violated state ethics laws and could have cost him his job.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"7b5349f9-68e6-5b76-8d60-bb34b520fbe0","description":"Davenport Community School District Superintendent Art Tate talks with first-graders about their class work in September 2016 at Garfield Elementary School, Davenport.","byline":"Kevin E. Schmidt, QUAD-CITY TIMES FILE PHOTO","hireswidth":1910,"hiresheight":1084,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b5/7b5349f9-68e6-5b76-8d60-bb34b520fbe0/57e72baa0ed38.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1910","height":"1084","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b5/7b5349f9-68e6-5b76-8d60-bb34b520fbe0/5b32b335ba250.image.jpg?resize=1910%2C1084"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"57","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b5/7b5349f9-68e6-5b76-8d60-bb34b520fbe0/5b32b335ba250.image.jpg?resize=100%2C57"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"170","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b5/7b5349f9-68e6-5b76-8d60-bb34b520fbe0/5b32b335ba250.image.jpg?resize=300%2C170"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"581","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b5/7b5349f9-68e6-5b76-8d60-bb34b520fbe0/5b32b335ba250.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C581"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"4a6b969d-679c-55d2-8d3b-0523eb3c91ed","body":"

Thumbs up to Iowa regulators for going easy on Davenport Superintendent Art Tate.

Tate has spent years locked in a battle with state officials over how his district can spend reserve funds. It's largely been a proxy war about the Iowa's insufficient educational funding model as a whole. But his move to divert reserve funds this past year violated state ethics laws and could have cost him his job.

Instead, the\u00a0Iowa Board of Educational Examiners merely censured Tate, a relative slap on the wrist. It was a smart political\u00a0move on the state's part, as Tate's ouster would have further inflamed tensions surrounding the issue and made a martyr\u00a0out of Davenport's soon-to-retire superintendent.\u00a0

And frankly, it's still hard to see how Tate's crusade for his students is unethical.

Illegal? Sure. Unethical? Not even close.\u00a0

Thumbs down to members of Davenport's Civil Rights Commission, for boosting Director Latrice Lacey's salary while her legal troubles are pending.

The commission approved a 2 percent cost of living increase for Lacey, bumping her annual salary to $117,000. Meanwhile, Lacey faces several misdemeanor charges after police allege she attacked a man earlier this year with a hammer.\u00a0

We get it, Lacey hasn't had her day in court and, as such, is completely innocent until a court determines otherwise. But this is taxpayer money and, at the very least, Civil Rights commissioners should tabled any decision until justice played out.\u00a0

Ultimately, commissioners work for the citizens and taxpayers. They'd be well served to remember that fact.\u00a0

Thumbs down\u00a0to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions: He came. He saw. He whined.\u00a0

Sessions spoke Friday at the\u00a0Eighth Circuit Judicial Conference in Des Moines. For nearly a half-hour, he howled about judges overturning the Trump administration's policies and the public criticizing his agency.\u00a0

\"I may have withdrawal symptoms when this thing is over,\" he said. \"The constant criticism kind of wakes you up in the morning. \u2018What are they going to say today?\u2019\u201d

This man is one of the highest ranking officials in the country and he still plays the victim. If anyone has victimized Session, it's his boss.

Just stop already.

"} ]