[ {"id":"68c9218f-8450-59c5-b3ab-0cee4561e6b4","type":"article","starttime":"1544427000","starttime_iso8601":"2018-12-10T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"letters":"opinion/letters"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Honoring Suzanne Golden","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/article_68c9218f-8450-59c5-b3ab-0cee4561e6b4.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-honoring-suzanne-golden/article_68c9218f-8450-59c5-b3ab-0cee4561e6b4.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-honoring-suzanne-golden/article_68c9218f-8450-59c5-b3ab-0cee4561e6b4.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"It is with pleasure that I invite the community to join our family in honoring the work of my late mother, Suzanne Golden, for her tireless work on behalf of services for those with mental illnesses. We are partnering with the United Jewish Community of the Quad Cities to fund needed renovations to the residential wing of Transitions Mental Health Services in Rock Island.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"68c9218f-8450-59c5-b3ab-0cee4561e6b4","body":"

It is with pleasure that I invite the community to join our family in honoring the work of my late mother, Suzanne Golden, for her tireless work on behalf of services for those with mental illnesses. We are partnering with the United Jewish Community of the Quad Cities to fund needed renovations to the residential wing of Transitions Mental Health Services in Rock Island.

My mother served on the Transitions\u2019 Board for nearly four decades until her death in 2015. My siblings join me in inviting you to help us make Sue\u2019s Wing a more energy efficient and welcoming place for residents to live and receive counseling and job training. We invite you to an evening of food, drink and live music at the Tri-City Jewish Center in Rock Island, Thursday, December 13th from 5:30 to 8 p.m.

There is no charge to enjoy the evening and to honor our mother\u2019s legacy, but contributions to the renovation project will be received with gratitude. The need for compassionate services and housing for those with mental illnesses in our community is great. We hope that those of you who knew my mother and appreciate the contribution that Transitions makes to our community, will join us in honoring both.

Linda Golden

Rock Island

"}, {"id":"f733d812-f738-5560-96da-8fecf3732ff5","type":"article","starttime":"1544427000","starttime_iso8601":"2018-12-10T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"opinion":"opinion"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Quote","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/article_f733d812-f738-5560-96da-8fecf3732ff5.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/quote/article_f733d812-f738-5560-96da-8fecf3732ff5.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/quote/article_f733d812-f738-5560-96da-8fecf3732ff5.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"\"So often, the president would say here's what I want to do and here's how I want to do it and I would have to say to him, Mr. President I understand what you want to do but you can't do it that way. It violates the law.\" Former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":3,"commentID":"f733d812-f738-5560-96da-8fecf3732ff5","body":"

\"So often, the president would say here's what I want to do and here's how I want to do it and I would have to say to him, Mr. President I understand what you want to do but you can't do it that way. It violates the law.\"

Former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson

"}, {"id":"6cbd79b4-c4d5-5224-b050-a4cd616554f9","type":"article","starttime":"1544427000","starttime_iso8601":"2018-12-10T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"China missed the mark on Trump","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/article_6cbd79b4-c4d5-5224-b050-a4cd616554f9.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/china-missed-the-mark-on-trump/article_6cbd79b4-c4d5-5224-b050-a4cd616554f9.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/china-missed-the-mark-on-trump/article_6cbd79b4-c4d5-5224-b050-a4cd616554f9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"\"When you strike at a king you must kill him,\" Ralph Waldo Emerson once said. Well, this year China tried to strike at President Trump for daring to launch a trade war with Beijing -- and missed the mark entirely. After Trump imposed massive tariffs on Chinese goods earlier this year, Beijing responded in June with what appeared to be a clever strategy: targeting retaliatory tariffs against Trump voters in rural farming communities across the United States. China is the largest importer of U.S. soybeans, buying $14 billion of them in 2017. Three of the biggest soybean-producing states, Indiana, Missouri and North Dakota, not only voted for Trump, but also in the 2018 midterms had Democratic senators, Joe Donnell, Ind., Claire McCaskill, Mo., and Heidi Heitkamp, N.D., who were up for reelection. If Beijing imposed painful tariffs on soybeans, Chinese leaders likely calculated, they could create a rift between Trump and rural voters who put him in the White House, give Senate Democrats a boost and force Trump to back down. But Trump did not back down. He countered by announcing $12 billion in aid for farmers, threatened to increase his tariffs on Chinese goods and asked his rural base to stick with him while he faced down the economic predators in Beijing. That is exactly what they did. Far from abandoning the president, rural voters hurt by Chinese tariffs rallied around Trump and the GOP. They threw Donnelly, Heitkamp and McCaskill out of office, allowing Republicans to expand their Senate majority. And while Republicans lost control of the House, few of the GOP losses came from rural districts. Competitive rural districts mostly ended up staying Republican; it was the urban-suburban districts that flipped to the Democrats. China's tariff ploy didn't just fail to sway the 2018 midterms; it actually backfired. The tariffs made the U.S. soybeans that China depends on more expensive, and Beijing soon found that alternative suppliers in South America could not produce enough to meet Chinese demand, leading to shortfalls. In other words, China went for a kill shot -- and ended up shooting itself in the foot. That has emboldened Trump in his negotiations with Chinese President Xi Jinping -- as shown by news this week that a senior executive of Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei had been arrested in Vancouver, at the request of the United States, on charges of violating sanctions on Iran. China demanded her release but nonetheless affirmed that it will still observe the 90-day tariff cease-fire Trump and Xi reached during their meeting last week in Buenos Aires -- putting off a scheduled Jan. 1 escalation of U.S. tariffs from 10 percent to 25 percent on $200 billion of Chinese goods while the two sides negotiate a deal. Trump has leverage going into those talks. The U.S. economy is booming, while China has just posted its weakest growth in nearly a decade. Moreover, during the Group of 20 meeting in Argentina, Xi saw how Trump has been able to bend his trade rivals to his will, and deliver trade victories for his working-class political base, when he held an elaborate signing ceremony for the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement. China will of course be a much tougher adversary than Mexico or Canada. As my American Enterprise Institute colleague Derek Scissors points out, the Chinese Communist Party controls the economy through state ownership and massive subsidies in dozens of sectors where U.S. goods and services can't compete fairly. Lifting tariffs is easy. Getting China to change its entire industrial policy will be hard -- as will stopping China's theft of U.S. intellectual property. But Trump knows that he has no chance of doing so by filing complaints with the World Trade Organization. So Trump is playing a game of chicken with Xi, appearing to calculate that the United States is in a better position to survive an all-out trade war. The markets panicked this week over Trump's recent pronouncement that he would be just as happy imposing tariffs as cutting a deal with China, but getting this message through to Xi is the only way to force his hand. As Trump tweeted this week, \"We are either going to have a REAL DEAL with China, or no deal at all -- at which point we will be charging major Tariffs against Chinese product being shipped into the United States,\" adding, \"remember \u2026 I am a Tariff Man.\" He means it. Trump actually believes that tariffs are good for the U.S. economy. The question is whether Xi believes he believes it. The answer may determine whether we get a deal or a trade war. Follow Marc A. Thiessen on Twitter, @marcthiessen. (c) 2018, The Washington Post Writers Group","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"dbd37bf4-9b09-5dc7-9a58-6b64c74db964","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"mugshot","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"904","height":"901","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/bd/dbd37bf4-9b09-5dc7-9a58-6b64c74db964/5a73804b695ca.image.jpg?resize=904%2C901"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"100","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/bd/dbd37bf4-9b09-5dc7-9a58-6b64c74db964/5a73804b695ca.image.jpg?resize=100%2C100"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"299","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/bd/dbd37bf4-9b09-5dc7-9a58-6b64c74db964/5a73804b695ca.image.jpg?resize=300%2C299"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1021","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/bd/dbd37bf4-9b09-5dc7-9a58-6b64c74db964/5a73804b695ca.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"6cbd79b4-c4d5-5224-b050-a4cd616554f9","body":"

\"When you strike at a king you must kill him,\" Ralph Waldo Emerson once said. Well, this year China tried to strike at President Trump for daring to launch a trade war with Beijing -- and missed the mark entirely.

After Trump imposed massive tariffs on Chinese goods earlier this year, Beijing responded in June with what appeared to be a clever strategy: targeting retaliatory tariffs against Trump voters in rural farming communities across the United States. China is the largest importer of U.S. soybeans, buying $14 billion of them in 2017. Three of the biggest soybean-producing states, Indiana, Missouri and North Dakota, not only voted for Trump, but also in the 2018 midterms had Democratic senators, Joe Donnell, Ind., Claire McCaskill, Mo., and Heidi Heitkamp, N.D., who were up for reelection. If Beijing imposed painful tariffs on soybeans, Chinese leaders likely calculated, they could create a rift between Trump and rural voters who put him in the White House, give Senate Democrats a boost and force Trump to back down.

But Trump did not back down. He countered by announcing $12 billion in aid for farmers, threatened to increase his tariffs on Chinese goods and asked his rural base to stick with him while he faced down the economic predators in Beijing. That is exactly what they did. Far from abandoning the president, rural voters hurt by Chinese tariffs rallied around Trump and the GOP. They threw Donnelly, Heitkamp and McCaskill out of office, allowing Republicans to expand their Senate majority. And while Republicans lost control of the House, few of the GOP losses came from rural districts. Competitive rural districts mostly ended up staying Republican; it was the urban-suburban districts that flipped to the Democrats.

China's tariff ploy didn't just fail to sway the 2018 midterms; it actually backfired. The tariffs made the U.S. soybeans that China depends on more expensive, and Beijing soon found that alternative suppliers in South America could not produce enough to meet Chinese demand, leading to shortfalls.

In other words, China went for a kill shot -- and ended up shooting itself in the foot.

That has emboldened Trump in his negotiations with Chinese President Xi Jinping -- as shown by news this week that a senior executive of Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei had been arrested in Vancouver, at the request of the United States, on charges of violating sanctions on Iran. China demanded her release but nonetheless affirmed that it will still observe the 90-day tariff cease-fire Trump and Xi reached during their meeting last week in Buenos Aires -- putting off a scheduled Jan. 1 escalation of U.S. tariffs from 10 percent to 25 percent on $200 billion of Chinese goods while the two sides negotiate a deal.

Trump has leverage going into those talks. The U.S. economy is booming, while China has just posted its weakest growth in nearly a decade. Moreover, during the Group of 20 meeting in Argentina, Xi saw how Trump has been able to bend his trade rivals to his will, and deliver trade victories for his working-class political base, when he held an elaborate signing ceremony for the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement.

China will of course be a much tougher adversary than Mexico or Canada. As my American Enterprise Institute colleague Derek Scissors points out, the Chinese Communist Party controls the economy through state ownership and massive subsidies in dozens of sectors where U.S. goods and services can't compete fairly. Lifting tariffs is easy. Getting China to change its entire industrial policy will be hard -- as will stopping China's theft of U.S. intellectual property.

But Trump knows that he has no chance of doing so by filing complaints with the World Trade Organization. So Trump is playing a game of chicken with Xi, appearing to calculate that the United States is in a better position to survive an all-out trade war. The markets panicked this week over Trump's recent pronouncement that he would be just as happy imposing tariffs as cutting a deal with China, but getting this message through to Xi is the only way to force his hand. As Trump tweeted this week, \"We are either going to have a REAL DEAL with China, or no deal at all -- at which point we will be charging major Tariffs against Chinese product being shipped into the United States,\" adding, \"remember \u2026 I am a Tariff Man.\"

He means it. Trump actually believes that tariffs are good for the U.S. economy. The question is whether Xi believes he believes it. The answer may determine whether we get a deal or a trade war.

Follow Marc A. Thiessen on Twitter, @marcthiessen.

(c) 2018, The Washington Post Writers Group

"}, {"id":"d1230c29-9e76-5fc8-8fcd-6b719ba0b456","type":"article","starttime":"1544427000","starttime_iso8601":"2018-12-10T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"letters":"opinion/letters"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Letter: Dems need practical people to win","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/article_d1230c29-9e76-5fc8-8fcd-6b719ba0b456.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-dems-need-practical-people-to-win/article_d1230c29-9e76-5fc8-8fcd-6b719ba0b456.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/letter-dems-need-practical-people-to-win/article_d1230c29-9e76-5fc8-8fcd-6b719ba0b456.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Elizabeth Bruenig is wrong in her article (Dec. 7) about U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke not being progressive enough. I watched the Democratic Party flounder between 1972 and 1992 by nominating candidates who were too far to the left. The only exception was Jimmy Carter, who was middle-of-the-road. In the 1980s Bill Clinton and others successfully lead the Democratic Party to a more central position to fill the void created by the Republican Party that was moving more to the right.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"d1230c29-9e76-5fc8-8fcd-6b719ba0b456","body":"

Elizabeth Bruenig is wrong in her article (Dec. 7) about U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke not being progressive enough. I watched the Democratic Party flounder between 1972 and 1992 by nominating candidates who were too far to the left. The only exception was Jimmy Carter, who was middle-of-the-road.

In the 1980s Bill Clinton and others successfully lead the Democratic Party to a more central position to fill the void created by the Republican Party that was moving more to the right.

The result was that the Democrats have won the presidency in every year starting in 1992, except for 2000, 2004 and 2016.\u00a0 In two of those three elections, the Democrat won the popular vote.\u00a0 A central position followed by Clinton and Obama is the way to win national elections, not moving to the far left.

You need two types of people. One type might be called the vision or conscience of the party.\u00a0 That type is represented by a Bernie Sanders or, maybe in the past, by a Ted Kennedy or Robert Kennedy. These people demonstrate the attitude of the Kennedys when they said, some people see things and ask why, I dream of things that never have been and ask why not. Then you need the practical people who can put together coalitions to win elections.

Hap Volz

Bettendorf

"}, {"id":"720caae9-5abf-5d0f-87fd-bc1f39bf83c2","type":"article","starttime":"1544427000","starttime_iso8601":"2018-12-10T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Tough choices ahead on minimum wage","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/article_720caae9-5abf-5d0f-87fd-bc1f39bf83c2.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/tough-choices-ahead-on-minimum-wage/article_720caae9-5abf-5d0f-87fd-bc1f39bf83c2.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/tough-choices-ahead-on-minimum-wage/article_720caae9-5abf-5d0f-87fd-bc1f39bf83c2.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Gov.-elect J.B. Pritzker was asked last week about the timeline for passage of a new minimum wage law.\u00a0 \"That\u2019s very important to me,\" Pritzker said. \"It\u2019s probably something we\u2019ll be able to get done in the first six months in office.\" Pritzker campaigned to increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour, so he was asked whether he was still on board for that goal.\u00a0","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"0d845c82-f39e-5d78-bfc6-ef85d9645425","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"229","height":"300","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d8/0d845c82-f39e-5d78-bfc6-ef85d9645425/5bef4e8b2dc8c.image.jpg?resize=229%2C300"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"131","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d8/0d845c82-f39e-5d78-bfc6-ef85d9645425/5bef4e8b2dc8c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C131"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"393","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d8/0d845c82-f39e-5d78-bfc6-ef85d9645425/5bef4e8b2dc8c.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1341","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d8/0d845c82-f39e-5d78-bfc6-ef85d9645425/5bef4e8b2dc8c.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"720caae9-5abf-5d0f-87fd-bc1f39bf83c2","body":"

Gov.-elect J.B. Pritzker was asked last week about the timeline for passage of a new minimum wage law.\u00a0

\"That\u2019s very important to me,\" Pritzker said. \"It\u2019s probably something we\u2019ll be able to get done in the first six months in office.\"

Pritzker campaigned to increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour, so he was asked whether he was still on board for that goal.\u00a0

I\u2019m told that Pritzker hopes to shield small businesses from excessive harm to their bottom lines by using some sort of tax relief, including tax credits. The devil is always in the details, including defining what is and isn\u2019t a small business, but that\u2019ll apparently be part of the upcoming negotiations.\u00a0

Illinois\u2019 current minimum wage is $8.25 per hour. Indiana, which has often made a public spectacle of poaching Illinois businesses, has a $7.25 an hour minimum wage. Chicago\u2019s minimum is $12 per hour and will rise to $13 an hour next year. Mayor Rahm Emanuel has claimed an increased minimum wage would attract workers from around the region.\u00a0

The Illinois Retail Merchants Association voted earlier this year to not endorse anyone in the governor\u2019s race, making it the only major business group which didn\u2019t back Gov. Bruce Rauner. It also took a pass on the gubernatorial contest four years ago, but endorsed Republican state Sen. Bill Brady over Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn in 2010.\u00a0

This year\u2019s decision came after two meetings between Pritzker and Rob Karr, IRMA\u2019s president and CEO. Karr came away impressed, believing that, while Pritzker has some very liberal goals, he will negotiate in good faith on ways of reaching those goals.\u00a0

IRMA has always tried to be an honest and willing negotiator. And its leader, Karr, was reportedly convinced from his two meetings with the then-candidate that once Pritzker made a deal he\u2019d stick with it and pass it, despite any objections from the hard left.\u00a0

Pritzker will have his work cut out for him in that regard. The head of the legislative Progressive Caucus, Rep. Will Guzzardi, D-Chicago, recently threw down an online gauntlet about how Illinois \"must not\" follow the lead of Colorado Democrats, who after taking over their state\u2019s legislature have now signaled that they\u2019ll be more open to negotiations with the business community.\u00a0

\"People elected us because we said we'd make their lives better,\" Guzzardi wrote. \"Raise their wages, provide decent benefits, make college and healthcare more affordable, etc. We ran on this. We won. And now... we run away? If so, why vote for us at all?\"

And Pritzker will also have to deal with more moderate Democrats on this topic. Those I\u2019ve spoken with are not necessarily opposed to a minimum wage increase, but going all the way up to $15 an hour gives them serious pause, even with possible tax credits.

"}, {"id":"50ba2e7e-1979-5a53-9b4a-e5ac5e208f70","type":"article","starttime":"1544340600","starttime_iso8601":"2018-12-09T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"opinion":"opinion"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Quote","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/article_50ba2e7e-1979-5a53-9b4a-e5ac5e208f70.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/quote/article_50ba2e7e-1979-5a53-9b4a-e5ac5e208f70.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/quote/article_50ba2e7e-1979-5a53-9b4a-e5ac5e208f70.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"\"If you want to have a vibrant community, you have to have housing at every level of the scale.\" Dan Garett, vice president, WNC Developers","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"50ba2e7e-1979-5a53-9b4a-e5ac5e208f70","body":"

\"If you want to have a vibrant community, you have to have housing at every level of the scale.\"

Dan Garett, vice president, WNC Developers

"}, {"id":"85862a90-63e8-5389-a478-23315a8e0d68","type":"article","starttime":"1544340600","starttime_iso8601":"2018-12-09T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"columnists":"opinion/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Report: Iowa budget more recession-ready than most states","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/article_85862a90-63e8-5389-a478-23315a8e0d68.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/report-iowa-budget-more-recession-ready-than-most-states/article_85862a90-63e8-5389-a478-23315a8e0d68.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/columnists/report-iowa-budget-more-recession-ready-than-most-states/article_85862a90-63e8-5389-a478-23315a8e0d68.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"Iowa\u2019s state budget is better prepared than most to handle a recession, according to a recent analysis by the Pew Charitable Trusts. The nonprofit, nonpartisan organization charted all 50 states\u2019 reserve balances as a percentage of state spending and the volatility in each state\u2019s revenues to help determine which states have put themselves in a good position to weather an economic downturn.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"e697f14a-22ae-5002-8064-d49ad58ef537","description":"Erin Murphy","byline":"","hireswidth":2000,"hiresheight":3000,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e697f14a-22ae-5002-8064-d49ad58ef537/540d228749b7c.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"406","height":"310","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e697f14a-22ae-5002-8064-d49ad58ef537/5a74cb0150e07.image.jpg?crop=406%2C310%2C2%2C66&resize=406%2C310&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e697f14a-22ae-5002-8064-d49ad58ef537/540d228756f25.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"229","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e697f14a-22ae-5002-8064-d49ad58ef537/5a74cb0150e07.image.jpg?crop=406%2C310%2C2%2C66&resize=300%2C229&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"782","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/qctimes.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/69/e697f14a-22ae-5002-8064-d49ad58ef537/5a74cb0150e07.image.jpg?crop=406%2C310%2C2%2C66"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"85862a90-63e8-5389-a478-23315a8e0d68","body":"

Iowa\u2019s state budget is better prepared than most to handle a recession, according to a recent analysis by the Pew Charitable Trusts.

The nonprofit, nonpartisan organization charted all 50 states\u2019 reserve balances as a percentage of state spending and the volatility in each state\u2019s revenues to help determine which states have put themselves in a good position to weather an economic downturn.

\"In general, states with greater revenue volatility need to save relatively more than do those with less fluctuation. High revenue volatility means that tax collections tend to drop more dramatically during economic downturns,\" the report says.

Iowa\u2019s reserve account balance as a percentage of state spending is roughly on par with the national average, according to the Pew analysis.

And Iowa\u2019s annual budget volatility is lower than average, according to the Pew analysis, which calculated each state\u2019s yearly percentage change in total tax revenue over the past 20 years, accounting for changes in tax policy.

That combination of an average reserve balance-to-spending ratio and below-average budget volatility placed Iowa in a class of no more than 10 states with favorable ratings in both categories.

\"States in this category might be relatively better off than others,\" the Pew report says. \"Their level of reserves are higher than average, and their revenue does not fluctuate as much as the typical state\u2019s. Although their saving levels still may not be high enough to mitigate a severe recession, these states are in a stronger position than those with either lower reserves or higher volatility.\"

Iowa\u2019s total state budget balances were 8.7 percent of spending in the 2018 budget year; the 50-state median was 8.6 percent, according to Pew.

That is down significantly from the 2013 budget year, when Iowa\u2019s total balance of $1.5 billion was 24 percent of spending, according to Pew\u2019s analysis.

Pew\u2019s analysis uses semiannual surveys of state budget officers conducted by the National Association of State Budget Officers.

States take redistricting from lawmakers

Voters in four states this year approved changes that limited the authority of state lawmakers to draw legislative boundaries, shifting that power instead to bipartisan or nonpartisan commissions in decennial (once every 10 years) redistricting.

The movement shows a trend of voters favoring redistricting programs designed to limit gerrymandering, the process of lawmakers drawing boundaries that benefit their political interests.

Missouri, Colorado, Michigan and Ohio this year approved plans that, while varied, generally put redistricting in the hands of bipartisan or nonpartisan commissions. Ohio\u2019s measure passed earlier this year; the others passed in the November midterm elections.

Still, more than 30 states have state lawmakers draw political boundaries, according to research by New York University Law School\u2019s nonpartisan Brennan Center for Justice.

Iowa\u2019s redistricting process is viewed as a model of fairness: legislative boundaries are drawn by the state\u2019s nonpartisan Legislative Services Agency using simple factors that do not necessarily benefit incumbents or either major political party. The maps are then approved by state legislators and the governor.

"}, {"id":"82a42e0c-bd32-5305-8d7b-1ad684c3b559","type":"article","starttime":"1544340600","starttime_iso8601":"2018-12-09T01:30:00-06:00","sections":[{"letters":"opinion/letters"}],"application":"editorial","title":"If life emulated sport","url":"http://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/article_82a42e0c-bd32-5305-8d7b-1ad684c3b559.html","permalink":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/if-life-emulated-sport/article_82a42e0c-bd32-5305-8d7b-1ad684c3b559.html","canonical":"https://qctimes.com/opinion/letters/if-life-emulated-sport/article_82a42e0c-bd32-5305-8d7b-1ad684c3b559.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"On Black Friday I watched Iowa and Nebraska play football. It was a great game: well played, exciting and not decided until the last second. Later I read and heard several analyses, most of which were fair and insightful. But none alluded to an important aspect of the game: that the high level of play transcended race. White players took hard blows in order to protect black runners and black players sacrificed their bodies for white teammates And they hugged and patted and complimented all those who made an especially good play; fallen players were lifted up without regard to race or uniform; Nebraska's attack was directed by a man named Mart\u00ednez and Iowa\u00b4s last second, game-winning field goal was by Miguel Recinos.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"revision":2,"commentID":"82a42e0c-bd32-5305-8d7b-1ad684c3b559","body":"

On Black Friday I watched Iowa and Nebraska play football. It was a great game: well played, exciting and not decided until the last second. Later I read and heard several analyses, most of which were fair and insightful.

But none alluded to an important aspect of the game: that the high level of play transcended race. White players took hard blows in order to protect black runners and black players sacrificed their bodies for white teammates And they hugged and patted and complimented all those who made an especially good play; fallen players were lifted up without regard to race or uniform; Nebraska's attack was directed by a man named Mart\u00ednez and Iowa\u00b4s last second, game-winning field goal was by Miguel Recinos.

And I thought: Why can't we be like them, and like the participants in other sports. Why can't we, in our daily and business and professional lives, respect and protect each other and lift up those who have fallen, regardless of race, ethnicity or religion? Surely a time when we celebrate \u201cThe Prince of Peace\u201d and look forward to a better future is the time to begin.

Donald C. Hawley

Eldridge

"} ]