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A good Monday to all. Today is Tax Day. Have you filed your tax return yet? Time is running out. 

Here are the weather details from the National Weather Service.

1. Mostly sunny today

NWS: New summary

Today we could see some scattered sprinkles between noon and 2 p.m. Otherwise the day will be mostly sunny with a high near 54 degrees and a low around 47 degrees.

Tuesday will be mostly cloudy with a high near 71 degrees and a low around 54 degrees.

There's a 30% chance of showers and thunderstorms overnight.

NWS: Wednesday forecast

Area rivers are experiencing flooding.

2. Pair help other families search for missing loved ones

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Marilyn McAllister, of Bettendorf, looks back before stepping over a log during a search and rescue training at Illiniwek Park in Hampton, Sunday, April 7, 2019. Her son, David McCallister, has been missing since May 11, 2017. She took part in an intense weekend of training to be certified in search and rescue.

When it rains, it pours, and Ray Eddleman was in a deluge.

For many years after his 11-year-old niece, Trudy Appleby, vanished from her Moline home in 1996, his family was devastated by grief and uncertainty.

In October of 2014, his sister and Trudy's mother, Brenda Gordon, was struck and killed by a drunken driver while crossing the street. On that same day, Ray Eddleman was laid off from his job.

Not even three months later, his mom, Trudy's grandmother, Ann Eddleman, passed away at 77.

"I was in a pretty dark place," he said.

Eddleman had met Dennis Harker, whose son, David Harker, went missing in 2013 and later was discovered to have accidentally drowned.

The two men had no idea they were to become "like a second family," Eddleman said.

Ray Eddleman needed something to do, so he started helping Dennis Harker get a second-hand store, Treasure Chest Resale Shop, up and running. The store would provide financial support to the group Harker founded after his son's death to help other families who would find themselves in the painful position he and his wife, Alice, had endured.

It helped Eddleman, being distracted by the needs of Harker's Quad-Cities Missing Persons Network.

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"We were still working on the Treasure Chest when Dennis asked if I was interested in getting involved with the search and rescue group," Eddleman said. "Getting involved with it really drug me out of the rut I was in. It gave me an out — a place for the pain I was feeling.

"I do the search and rescue because of Trudy, but I do it for the families of everyone else. The feeling of helping another family that is in the same situation as my family, knowing how they feel, that propels me to want to help put an end to what they're going through. Read more.

3. It took 4.5 years, but Kohl's has begun erosion repair behind Davenport store

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Jesse Hammes of Davenport stands on a hillside in back of the Kohl's department store on Elmore Avenue, talking about the erosion that has occurred on his property because of stormwater runoff. Behind him is one of two concrete storm sewer pipes that drains the parking lot. In front of the pipe, lying on the ground, are three pieces that broke off when they were exposed as water gushing out of the pipe eroded the slope of the hill backwards until it created a deep, nearly vertical cut.

In October 2014, the city of Davenport sent a letter to Kohl's Department Stores notifying the company it was violating the stormwater ordinance because of severe erosion behind its Elmore Avenue store and directing it to fix the problem within 60 days.

"Failure to comply with the requirements contained within this notification will force us to initiate compliance actions including, but not limited to civil citations," the letter to Kohl's Milwaukee headquarters stated.

Last week — 4½ years later — a contractor for Kohl's began work to address problems behind the store where 9.4 acres of land it owns drops sharply down to Pheasant Creek.

When Kohl's was built during 1993, two concrete drainage pipes were installed  underground to convey water from parking lot intakes to the back of the property where it simply dumped out.

Over time, water flowing — sometimes gushing — out of the two pipes eroded the slope of the hill backwards until it created two deep, nearly vertical cuts that, in addition to looking like they could collapse any moment, exposed portions of the originally-buried pipes. Sections of the pipes broke off, and flowing water dug new gullies as it drained toward Pheasant Creek. Read more.

4. Dogs with Jobs

The Putnam hosted Dogs With Jobs on Sunday in Davenport. Dogs With Jobs showcased service and therapy dogs from the Quad-Cities Canine Assistance Network, Quad Cities Dog Obedience Club and Pawsitive Hearts.

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5. Curtis Craig set the standard for Q-C running backs

Fred Harris has been coaching football in the Quad-Cities for about four decades and he has seen a lot of high-octane, high-stepping, high-profile running backs in that time.

Roger Craig. Tavian Banks. Marques Simmons. David Johnson.

But Harris remembers this one other guy who predated all of those backs who was every bit as good, if not better. He didn’t see all of his great runs because they sometimes occurred behind him and he’s admittedly a little biased, but Harris hasn’t seen anyone he thought was better than Curtis Craig.

Craig will be one of this year’s inductees into the Quad-City Sports Hall of Fame. He will be honored along with Jayme Olson and Murray Hurt on May 5 at the Quad-City Times’ annual Salute to Sports at Bettendorf High School. Read more.