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    The U.S. Justice Department has announced a settlement with the state of Iowa to resolve allegations of abuse and inadequate care at a state-run care center for people with intellectual disabilities. A proposed consent decree announced Thursday would see an independent monitor appointed to assess the state’s compliance at the Glenwood Resource Center. The Justice Department found in 2020 that the center likely violated the constitutional rights of residents by subjecting them to human experiments — including sexual arousal research. That report identified broad failures at the center, including poor treatment of residents and failure of the Iowa Department of Human Services to respond.

      The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed increasing ethanol and other biofuels that must be blended into the nation’s fuel supplies over the next three years. Thursday's announcement was welcomed by renewable fuel and farm groups but condemned by environmentalists and oil industry groups. The proposal also includes incentives for the use of biogas from farms and landfills, and biomass such as wood, to generate electricity to charge electric vehicles. It’s the first time the EPA has set biofuel targets on its own instead deferring to Congress. The agency opened a public comment period and will hold a hearing in January.

        A woman who long advocated for Native American rights and was known for organizing protests against the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines has died. Joye Braun, a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux, died on Nov. 13 at age 53 at her home in Eagle Butte, South Dakota. Indian Country Today reports that Braun worked as a national pipeline organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network. At the Dakota Access protest, her teepee was the first to go up at what became Oceti Sakowin camp at Standing Rock. Her daughter said that seeing the Keystone XL pipeline blocked was one of Braun's proudest achievements.

          Eds: The Iowa editorial roundup will not move this week due to a lack of editorials of state-wide interest. We will resume the roundup at its normal time on Monday, Dec. 5.

            Nebraska agriculture officials say another 1.8 million chickens must be killed after bird flu was found on a farm. It's the latest sign that the outbreak has kept spreading after having already prompted the slaughter of more than 50 million birds nationwide. The Nebraska Department of Agriculture said Saturday that the state's 13th case of bird flu was found on an egg-laying farm in northeast Nebraska's Dixon County. All the chickens on the Nebraska farm are being killed to limit the spread of the disease. Officials say the virus presents little risk to human health because human cases are extremely rare and infected birds aren't allowed into the nation's food supply.

            A jury has returned a $27 million verdict against a central Iowa medical clinic after a man with bacterial meningitis was misdiagnosed with the flu, suffered strokes and said he has been permanently injured. The jury in Polk County District Court in Des Moines returned the verdict Monday in the lawsuit filed in 2017 against UnityPoint Clinic Family Medicine in Des Moines. Joseph Dudley and his wife Sarah Dudley filed the lawsuit after Joseph became ill with dizziness, headache, a cough and high fever in February 2017 and went to the clinic. A physician's assistant diagnosed him with the flu but it was later determined he had meningitis. UnityPoint says it met well-established standards of care and may appeal.

            From South Dakota and Oklahoma to Alaska and Alberta, Indigenous groups in the U.S. and Canada are leading efforts to restore bison across North America more than a century after European settlers drove the species near extinction. Tribes now have a collective 20,000 bison and that’s been growing steadily along with a desire among many Native Americans to reclaim stewardship of an animal their predecessors lived alongside and depended upon for millennia. The long-term dream for many: return bison, also known as buffalo, on a scale rivaling the tens of millions that once roamed the continent in thundering herds that shaped the landscape itself.

            Indigenous groups in the U.S. and Canada are leading efforts to restore bison across North America more than a century after European settlers drove the species to near extinction. Tribes now have a collective 20,000 bison and that’s been growing steadily along with a desire among many Native Americans to reclaim stewardship of an animal their predecessors lived alongside and depended upon for millennia. The long-term dream for many is to return bison, also known as buffalo, on a scale rivaling the tens of millions that once roamed the continent in thundering herds that shaped the landscape itself.

            Blood centers in the U.S. are scrambling to track down hundreds of thousands of former donors turned away because of worries about mad cow disease in Europe more than two decades ago. The Food and Drug Administration lifted longtime rules that had barred blood donations from people, including current and former military members, who spent time in the U.K. and other countries during periods from 1980 to 2001.  The FDA determined there was little risk from blood donations of acquiring the rare and fatal brain infection tied to eating contaminated beef.

            DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — It’s common knowledge for central Iowans that it usually takes only about 30 minutes to get from the entrance doors to Des Moines International Airport’s departure gates.

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            MOUNT VERNON, Iowa (AP) — Some Iowa beekeepers make extra money by taking their bees to California for the winter to pollinate almond trees, but that work is literally drying up with the drought on the West Coast.

            In a major action to address toxic wastewater from coal-fired power plants, the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday ordered an Ohio utility to stop dumping dangerous coal ash into unlined storage ponds and speed cleanup of the site. The order to the Gen. James Gavin Power Plant in southern Ohio marks the first time the EPA has formally denied a utility’s request to continue disposing toxic coal ash after a deadline to stop such disposal has passed. The Gavin plant, located along the Ohio River in Cheshire, Ohio, is one of the largest coal-fired electricity plants in the U.S. At least five other plants face similar action by the EPA under a crackdown announced in January.

            A judge has set a hearing for January to consider whether to order prison for an 18-year-old sex-trafficking victim who killed her rapist in Iowa and pleaded guilty last year to involuntary manslaughter and willful injury. Pieper Lewis was sentenced on Sept. 13 to probation for five years to be served at a Des Moines women's shelter, but less than two months later she walked away. She was arrested five days later and taken to jail. Judge David Porter had set a hearing for Friday to consider whether to revoke the probation, but after meeting briefly with lawyers, he scheduled a new hearing for Jan. 18. It wasn’t immediately clear why the hearing was postponed.

            Anne Discher, executive director of Common Good Iowa, was leaving a conference of early childhood advocates this week in Chicago when she said she kept getting stopped and asked the same question: What is Iowa thinking?

            Fire officials say a house fire that killed four children in northern Iowa was caused by an electrical power strip. The blaze was reported early Wednesday in Mason City. When firefighters arrived they found flames engulfing the first and second stories of the home, built in the 1880s. Fire officials said Thursday the blaze began at a power strip on the main floor of the three-story home. Officials did not specify how the strip caused the fire, however. The four children killed were identified as 12-year-old John Michael Mcluer, 10-year-old Odin Thor Mcluer; 6-year-old Drako Mcluer; and 3-year-old Phenix Mcluer.

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