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Firefighting crews are battling a wind-driven wildfire that has blackened swaths of pine forest near a popular resort in southwestern Turkey and driven hundreds of people from their homes. More than 2,500 firefighters, aided by water-dropping planes and helicopters, were deployed on Thursday. The blaze erupted late on Tuesday in the Bordubet region, near Marmaris on Turkey’s Aegean coast, and rapidly grew, fanned by winds. Authorities have evacuated close to 275 people from the area as a precaution. Prosecutors were investigating the cause of the blaze, including the possibility of arson. The blaze in Bordubet comes one year after wildfires, described as the worst in Turkey’s history, ravaged forests in the Mediterranean and Aegean regions, killing eight people.

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The owner of seven Louisiana nursing homes whose residents suffered in squalid conditions after being evacuated to a warehouse for Hurricane Ida has been arrested. Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry says 68-year-old Bob Glynn Dean Jr. faces multiple counts of cruelty to persons with infirmities, Medicaid fraud, and obstruction of justice. Dean's lawyer said Dean surrendered to authorities in Tangipahoa Parish on Wednesday and was to be released on $350,000 bond. In a news release, Landry says Dean billed Medicaid for dates his residents were not receiving proper care at the warehouse and engaged in conduct intended to intimidate or obstruct public health officials and law enforcement.

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More than a thousand firefighters, aided by water-dropping planes and helicopters, are battling a wildfire that erupted overnight near a popular resort in southwestern Turkey forcing dozens of home evacuations. An official voiced hope Wednesday that the blaze — one year after the worst wildfires in Turkey’s history — was close to being tamed but urged caution due to the strong prevailing winds.The fi re erupted Tuesday evening in the Bordubet region, near Marmaris on Turkey’s Aegean coast. It spread rapidly, fanned by strong winds, the state-run Anadolu Agency reported. The smoke made its way over to the Greek island of Rhodes - a short ferry ride from Marmaris.

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Firefighters in Spain and Germany area struggling to contain wildfires amid an unusual heat wave in Western Europe for this time of year. Authorities say the worst damage in Spain has been in the northwest province of Zamora where over 30,000 hectares (74,000 acres) have been consumed. German officials said that residents of three villages near Berlin were ordered to leave their homes because of an approaching wildfire Sunday. Spanish authorities warned there was still danger that an unfavorable shift in weather could revive the blaze that caused the evacuation of 18 villages.

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Authorities say a lightning-caused wildfire that led to an evacuation of the a national observatory southwest of Tucson is 40% contained. More than 300 firefighters are working to suppress the wildfire Saturday. If all goes as planned, authorities say the blaze could be fully contained by next Sunday. The wind-whipped fire started June 11 on a remote ridge on the Tohono O’odham Indian Reservation, near Kitt Peak. It had grown to 27.5 square miles before rain fell on the area Saturday. The fire was up to 29.4 square miles as of Sunday. Flames had reached Kitt Peak by Thursday, and officials ordered evacuations in a small community north of the mountain.

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In its third public hearing, the House panel investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection has focused on former President Donald Trump’s pressure on his vice president to delay or reject the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory. It has also attempted to show how that pressure incited an angry mob to break into the Capitol that day. Vice President Mike Pence presided over the certification in the vice president’s traditional ceremonial role, and did not give in to Trump’s pressure. Lawmakers on the nine-member panel, and the witnesses who testified at the hearing, all described Pence’s decision as having averted a constitutional crisis.

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Four officers won’t face criminal charges for shooting and killing a man armed with a gun who tried to drive through a wildfire evacuation checkpoint near illegal Northern California marijuana farms last summer. The Siskiyou County district attorney on Tuesday exonerated the officers for the death of Soobleej Hawj near Big Springs. Authorities say Hawj, who was from Kansas City, Kansas, pulled a gun and had other guns and 132 pounds of pot in his pickup truck when he ignored orders at the checkpoint on June 24. The checkpoint was set up as a wildfire sparked by lightning forced thousands to flee.

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Yellowstone National Park officials say more than 10,000 visitors have been ordered out of the nation’s oldest national park after unprecedented flooding tore through its northern half, washing out bridges and roads and sweeping an employee bunkhouse miles downstream. Remarkably, no one was reported injured or killed. Superintendent Cam Sholly said Tuesday the only visitors left in the massive park straddling three states were a dozen campers still making their way out of the backcountry. Sholly says the park could remain closed as long as a week, and northern entrances may not reopen this summer.

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Fire crews in northern Arizona are getting help from the weather as they work to get a handle on wildfires on the outskirts of Flagstaff. Winds moderated Tuesday after a day of red flag conditions. Authorities downgraded the scale of evacuations but residents of hundreds of homes were still under orders to stay out of fire areas. Wildfires broke out early this spring in multiple states in the Western U.S., where climate change and an enduring drought are fanning the frequency and intensity of forest and grassland blazes.

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Flooding has wiped out roads and bridges and closed off all entrances to Yellowstone National Park at the onset of the busy summer tourist season. Officials are evacuating visitors from the northern part of the park. And the flooding has cut off road access to Gardiner, a town of about 900 people near Yellowstone’s busy North Entrance. The flooding caused at least one rock slide, cut off electricity and imperiled water and sewer systems in northern Yellowstone, but has affected other areas of the park as well. Flooding also has hit the Yellowstone gateway communities of Red Lodge and Joliet in southern Montana.

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Wildfires burning throughout the American West are forcing evacuations as crews deal with more hot, windy and dry conditions. Residents were ordered to flee remote homes near a wildfire in the mountains northeast of Los Angeles. In Arizona, firefighters are battling a wildfire on the northern outskirts of Flagstaff that has forced evacuations in the same area as another springtime blaze. Firefighters in New Mexico are battling some of the nation's largest blazes in tinder dry forests. Federal officials say the number of acres burns nationwide so far this year is more than double the 10-year average.

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Authorities say firefighters are responding to a wildfire about six miles north of Flagstaff, Arizona, that has forced evacuations. Coconino National Forest officials say the Pipeline Fire was reported at 10:15 a.m. Sunday by a fire lookout. By late that evening, it had burned approximately 4,000-5,000 acres, pushing about 15 miles. Forest Service law enforcement say they have arrested and charged a 57-year-old man with natural resource violations, without providing further details. Officials say the Arizona Snowbowl and people living in the west Schultz Pass Road area must evacuate. People living in Doney Park and the area near Mt. Elden should be prepared. Officials have closed U.S. Route 89.

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A tundra wildfire has moved closer to an Alaska Native community in southwest Alaska, but mandatory evacuations have not been ordered. Fire officials Sunday said the East Fork fire was within 3.5 miles of St. Mary’s. Even though it had moved 1.5 miles closer to the Yup’ik community since Saturday, fire managers said the progress has slowed somewhat because of favorable weather conditions. Firefighters are working to strengthen primary and secondary fire lines protecting St. Mary’s and the nearby communities of Pitkas Point and Mountain Village and properties, including cabins, between them. About 150 people have voluntarily relocated to Bethel.

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President Joe Biden says he is escalating federal assistance for New Mexico as it faces its largest wildfire in recorded state history. The fire began with prescribed burns that were set by the U.S. Forest Service to clear out combustible underbrush. But the burns spread out of control, destroying hundreds of homes across 500 square miles since early April. Biden visited an emergency operations center in Santa Fe on Saturday and met with local, state and federal officials. He was returning to Washington from Los Angeles, where he had attended the Summit of the Americas.

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A large fire burning in the tundra of southwest Alaska continues to move toward an Alaska Native village, but fire managers say it is moving at a slower rate. The East Fork fire was started by lightning May 31. It remained about 5 miles from the Yup’ik village of St. Mary’s on Saturday. The fire was listed at 169 square miles, more than double the last estimate. The increase was attributed to better mapping. There were 180 personnel working the fire, with more crews expected to arrive Monday. There are no mandatory evacuation orders, but about 700 residents of St. Mary’s and the nearby community of Pitkas Point have been told to prepare in case they need to leave.

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President Joe Biden says Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy “didn’t want to hear it” when U.S. intelligence gathered information that Russia was preparing to invade. Speaking to donors at a Democratic fundraiser in Los Angeles, made the remarks as he talked about his work to rally support for Ukraine as the war continues into its fourth month. “Nothing like this has happened since World War II. I know a lot of people thought I was maybe exaggerating. But I knew we had data to sustain he” — meaning Russian President Vladimir Putin — “was going to go in, off the border.”

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Civilians are fleeing eastern Ukraine where Russian and Ukrainian forces are engaged in a grinding war off attrition. Women, children and elderly residents departed Friday on a special evacuation train. Svitlana Kaplun left with her family after shelling reached their neighborhood. She told The Associated Press that her kids were "worried all the time” and “afraid to sleep at night.” Russia's military bungled an attempt to overrun Ukraine’s capital of Kyiv in the early days of the war. It has since shifted its focus to Ukraine's eastern region of coal mines and factories known as the Donbas. The area borders Russia and has been partly controlled by Moscow-backed separatists since 2014.

The largest documented wildfire burning through tundra in southwest Alaska is within miles of two Alaska Native villages. Residents in the communities of St. Mary's and Pitkas Point were put on notice Friday to prepare for possible evacuation. This came a day after about 80 elders and those with health concerns voluntarily evacuated. The fire is consuming dry grass, alder and willow bushes on the largely treeless tundra as gusts of up to 30 mph are pushing the fire in the general direction of both communities. The fire was 78 square miles and 7 miles from St. Mary's.

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Some Afghans who were evacuated from their country as it fell to the Taliban last summer have found their journey to the United States stalled at a cluster of tents and temporary housing at a military base in the Balkans. More than 78,000 Afghans have arrived in the U.S. for resettlement since August. But the fate of people who were flagged for additional security vetting, and diverted to Camp Bondsteel in the small nation of Kosovo, remains up in the air. Frustration is growing among the Afghans, some of whom staged a protest at the base this week after learning they won't be allowed to enter the U.S.

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The White House says a small private airplane entered restricted airspace near President Joe Biden’s Delaware vacation home on Saturday, and that led to the brief evacuation of the president and first lady. The White House says there was no threat to Biden or his family and that precautionary measures were taken. After the situation was assessed, Biden and his wife, Jill, returned to their Rehoboth Beach home. The Secret Service said in a statement that the plane was immediately escorted from the restricted airspace after “mistakenly entering a secured area.” The agency said it would interview the pilot who, according to a preliminary investigation, was not on the proper radio channel and was not following published flight guidance.

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A group of people evacuated from Afghanistan as the Taliban returned to power last year have held a protest in Albania over the failure to expedite their move to the United States. A small group of families in a resort town located 45 miles northwest of Albania’s capital, Tirana, called on the U.S. to speed up the process of their transfer. Some women and children held posters reading, “We are forgotten.” Some 2,400 Afghans were evacuated to Albania in August and September 2021 and given temporary shelter. The Albanian government said at the time that it would house the evacuees for at least a year before they moved to the United States for final settlement.

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Authorities say two manhole explosions in downtown Boston have forced the evacuation of two buildings, poured smoke into the streets and sent one person to the hospital with burns. The explosions were reported around 8:30 a.m. Thursday in the city’s Financial District. A fire department official says the cause may be linked to too much pressure. Officials say two buildings were evacuated and one person was taken to a hospital by emergency medical services. The fire department is also checking buildings for smoke and possible elevated levels of carbon monoxide.

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German lawmakers say the country's parliament will set up a commission of inquiry into last year’s evacuation mission from Afghanistan and a fact-finding commission on Berlin’s two-decade involvement there. Senior lawmakers from Chancellor Olaf Scholz’s governing coalition and from the main opposition Union bloc of ex-Chancellor Angela Merkel said Thursday that the two panels will be established before parliament’s summer break starts next month. They said that the aim of both commissions is to learn lessons for the future. Germany had the second-biggest contingent in the NATO-led mission in Afghanistan until last year’s withdrawal, and for years oversaw security and training efforts in the north of the country.

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Authorities say a large fire that raged through a Nebraska chemical plant was extinguished and nearby residents who were initially evacuated were allowed to return to their homes. Thick smoke billowed from the Nox-Crete facility just southwest of downtown Omaha that could be seen as far away Monday evening. Battalion Chief Scott Fitzpatrick said the first call for help came shortly before 7 p.m. Monday, and firefighters who initially entered the building found a much bigger fire than they had anticipated, forcing them to retreat. No injuries were reported. Officials say the smoke posed no major toxicity risks to the public. The cause of the fire wasn’t immediately known.

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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy says the Russian blockade of Ukrainian sea ports prevents Kyiv from exporting 22 million tons of grain. In his nightly address Monday, Zelenskyy said the result is the threat of famine in countries dependent on the grain and could create a new migration crisis. He charges that “this is something the Russian leadership clearly seeks.” Zelenskyy accuses Moscow of, in his words, “deliberately creating this problem so that the whole of Europe struggles and so that Ukraine doesn’t earn billions of dollars from its exports.” He calls Russia’s claims that sanctions don’t allow it to export more of its food “cynical” and a lie.

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