Skip to main content
Updating results

United Kingdom

Her new book, "The Beatryce Prophecy," sprang from a rediscovered draft that she had abandoned after the death of her beloved mother. MINNEAPOLIS — In August 2018, Kate DiCamillo was in the office of her Minneapolis home, sorting through a decade's worth of old papers and manuscripts, when she happened upon a stunning discovery — the first 40 pages of a long-abandoned, long-forgotten novel. ...

"Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol," a series that premiered on Peacock last week featuring ace symbologist Robert Langdon, represents another high point in the lucrative career of one of the bestselling mystery authors of all time. But it also serves as a clue in someone else's quest — that of his ex-wife, Blythe Brown. The show is among several projects embroiled in a court battle over the ...

Time for a new paperback? Here are six fresh-off-the-press possibilities; a little mystery-heavy (hey, it's almost fall), but something for everyone. "Snow" by John Banville (Hanover Square Press, $16.99). For years, the Irish novelist Banville has written a series of crackling mystery novels under the name of Benjamin Black — but this whodunit, set in 1950s Ireland, is under his own name. ...

NONFICTION: A keenly observed memoir about the author's arduous travels in search of himself. "Saga Boy" by Antonio Michael Downing; Milkweed Editions (344 pages, $25) ——— "You can only become the person you always were," Antonio Michael Downing writes in "Saga Boy: My Life of Blackness and Becoming," a rich memoir about how far some folks have to travel just to arrive where they began. In ...

FICTION: A French teenager rises to become the formidable prioress of an English convent. "Matrix" by Lauren Groff; Riverhead (272 pages, $28) ——— Lauren Groff has been contemplating the wellspring of female power in her fiction for awhile now, notably in the startling second act of her novel "Fates and Furies," but also in the humid shadows of her story collection "Florida." Where does power ...

Not much happens in R.C. Sherriff's "The Fortnight in September," and that quietness is part of the novel's immense charm. The English seaside town of Bognar Regis is where the Stevens family always spends their late-summer vacation, swimming, eating, chatting, strolling the promenade, playing games in the arcade. But this time there is an unspoken sense that it might be the last such ...

FICTION: The author of "Normal People" returns with another perceptive novel about relationships. "Beautiful World, Where Are You" by Sally Rooney; Farrar, Straus & Giroux (368 pages, $28) ——— Sally Rooney's "Normal People" was a masterful depiction of first love. Readers of the Irish author's second novel — and, later, viewers of the acclaimed Hulu series — followed Marianne and Connell ...

  • Updated

FICTION: A simple desire to call a space her own creates conflict in the life of a woman in modern London. "Three Rooms" by Jo Hamya; Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (208 pages, $25) ——— If, as Virginia Woolf once argued, a woman needs money and a room of her own, what does she do when neither is available to her? How can she be her own person if the only jobs available pay minimum wage and rents ...

  • Updated

FICTION: A third compulsively readable whodunit from the author of "The Girl on the Train." "A Slow Fire Burning" by Paula Hawkins; Riverhead (320 pages, $28) ——— Early one Sunday morning on a quiet stretch of London's Regent's Canal, Miriam makes a grisly discovery. In the houseboat next to hers lies the bloodied body of a young man. He has been stabbed repeatedly and, as a finishing touch, ...

FICTION: A masterful retelling of a classical myth featuring a memorable heroine. "The Women of Troy: A Novel" by Pat Barker; Doubleday (304 pages, $28) ——— Pat Barker's 2018 novel "The Silence of the Girls" marked both a late-career high and an intriguing change of direction for the Booker Prize-winning author. Instead of playing to her strengths and serving up another depiction of innocent ...

NONFICTION: The first biography of Elizabeth Barrett Browning in 30 years reminds readers of her significance, both in poetry and in politics. "Two-Way Mirror" by Fiona Sampson; W.W. Norton (320 pages, $27.95) ——— Today British poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning is remembered mostly for her love poetry — her line, "How do I love thee? Let me count the ways," written for her lover and eventual ...

"Yours Cheerfully" continues the story of Emmy Lake, the plucky narrator of A.J. Pearce's 2018 debut novel, "Dear Mrs. Bird." In that book, Emmy had hoped to become a war correspondent but instead landed a part-time job opening mail for an advice columnist at a women's magazine. There, she secretly responded to the letters that Mrs. Bird, the columnist, rejected — with disastrous results. In ...

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh's first book revealed who he was and where he came from. "When Skateboards Will be Free" (2009) was a candid, clear-eyed memoir of what he called his "political childhood," namely his years spent growing up in Pittsburgh and being force-fed the socialist dogma of an Iranian-born father and American Jewish mother. His next book showed what he could do not with fact, but with ...

"The Irish Assassins: Conspiracy, Revenge, and the Phoenix Park Murders That Stunned Victorian England" by Julie Kavanagh; Atlantic Monthly Press (480 pages, $28) ——— All history is complicated, of course, the deeper you dig and the more points of view you seek. But I'm not sure any history is more convoluted than modern Irish history, with allegiances to churches, causes and ancient grudges; ...

NONFICTION: An English farmer finds balance between sustaining his family and sustaining the land. "Pastoral Song" by James Rebanks; Custom House (294 pages, $28.99) ——— When James Rebanks was a child, he used to help his father and grandfather on their farms in the hilly Lake District of England. Fields of barley, hay and oats; some sheep, some cows, some pigs; a kitchen garden. The work was ...

Time again for a paperback roundup! Here are six new ones, all guaranteed to take you somewhere far from your armchair or front porch. "Transcendent Kingdom" by Yaa Gyasi (Vintage, $16). The author of "Homegoing" returns with the tale of a graduate neuroscience student from an immigrant evangelical family. "Triumphant as the journey of a first-generation American to a Stanford Ph.D. might ...

FICTION: A thrilling debut in which a pilot must crash his plane to save his family. "Falling" by T.J. Newman; Avid Reader Press (304 pages, $28) ——— Early into "Falling," and not long into a flight from Los Angeles to New York, the pilot-protagonist Bill Hoffman takes a calculated risk and confides in a hushed tone to his friend. "Jo," he whispers. "We have a situation." Which is something of ...

In Maggie Nelson’s “Bluets,” her 2009 collection of poems on grief and loss, loneliness is “solitude with a problem.” Which is a useful way of understanding loneliness. Being alone and feeling lonely are not always the same thing. Except, of course, it’s complicated. Emily Dickinson wondered: Was loneliness “the maker of the soul”? Or its “seal”? Does loneliness define you? Or exacerbate ...

Sure, Prince William’s tweets made international news after the Euro 2020 soccer championships. But his brother, Harry, is on a mission to craft his own narrative, one far longer than 280 characters. Backed by Penguin Random House, the younger prince will publish an “intimate and heartfelt” memoir on the life, lessons and losses that have shaped him, tentatively planned for release in late ...

FICTION: A powerful tale of two relatives fighting painful battles in India, seven decades apart. "China Room" by Sunjeev Sahota; Viking (256 pages, $27) ——— Sunjeev Sahota's "China Room" is an intelligent, earnest novel, and although one of its story lines is weaker than the other, it's consistently absorbing, a sweeping dual portrait of a woman forced into an adolescent marriage and the ...

FICTION: A strong debut collection of stories about the lives of modern women. "Objects of Desire" by Clare Sestanovich; Alfred A. Knopf (224 pages, $26) ——— "Objects of Desire," Clare Sestanovich's first collection of stories, focuses on women navigating key stages in their lives and making sense of what comes their way and what fails to materialize. Some of the 11 tales take the form of ...

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News